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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Helen Rhodes and Jacqueline Chelin

A survey carried out during 1998 investigated the use of the World Wide Web for user education in 68 UK university libraries. Almost three‐quarters of the libraries…

Abstract

A survey carried out during 1998 investigated the use of the World Wide Web for user education in 68 UK university libraries. Almost three‐quarters of the libraries surveyed make use of the Web for this purpose. The Web is used as a supplement to existing user education, in order to support independent, student centred learning and to reach parttime and distance learners. Just ten percent of user education is delivered solely via the Web, but libraries indicated that use will grow in the future. It was found that greater use is made of the Web for information skills training than for library induction. The authors suggest a number of reasons why more use is not being made of the Web for user education and propose future developments in this area. Web‐based instruction is unlikely to completely replace traditional methods, but it can be used to supplement and extend existing provision.

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Program, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Göran Fransson

– The purpose of this paper is to report on a research project concerning a web-based (online) course for mentors of newly qualified teachers (NQTs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a research project concerning a web-based (online) course for mentors of newly qualified teachers (NQTs).

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach with questionnaires and interviews was used to collect the data.

Findings

Positive attitudes towards online education were discerned and initial concerns about the use of technical tools were dissipated during the course. It was found that the mentoring-related content of the online course could be mediated. The most significant difference in the participants’ meaning making and ability to “connect theory and practice” with “concrete knowledge” was between those with experience of mentorship before or during the course and those without.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on one cohort of mentor participants (n=18) attending one mentor education course.

Practical implications

The paper contributes to the value of online education for mentors of NQTs and includes some practical recommendations for mentor education providers.

Originality/value

This paper reports on an under-researched area. Research on professional development programmes for mentors in general is limited, and even more so when it comes to online education for mentors.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Chutima Sacchanand and Vipa Jaroenpuntaruk

The purpose of this project was to develop a web‐based self‐training package for information retrieval using the distance education approach.

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2326

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this project was to develop a web‐based self‐training package for information retrieval using the distance education approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The package was developed using the distance education approach with STOU Plan, STOU Plan 2000 and GMS‐VU applied. The distance education model for the web‐based self‐training package was composed of five stages: identifying the learners, design of the package, production of the package, establishing the delivery system, and evaluation. The system development methodology was based on the system development lifecycle (SDLC) with a combination of waterfall, phased and prototyping approaches. There are several phase in SDLC to carry out: problem and objective identification, requirement determination, requirement analysis, package design, package implementation, delivery system and evaluation. Evaluation of the package was conducted in two phases: formative evaluation and summative evaluation using the focus group discussion method. Formative evaluation was conducted during the package development by experts in the field prior to the summative evaluation. The summative evaluation was conducted after the package development had been completed as a pilot study for field trial by target users, consisting of junior library staff and library users. All comments were reviewed and refined in terms of instructional content, design, overall opinion and learning progress before put on production.

Findings

The package consists of three main components: About the project, Study modules, References and further readings. Study modules, which is the most important component, consists of ten instructional modules focusing on information retrieval, and self‐assessment through pre‐test and post‐test. The package includes multimedia such as images and sound to attract learners during their learning session. The delivery mode for the self‐training package offers both online and off‐line modes. Online mode is offered when there is network facility and internet connection available, while offline mode is offered through CD‐ROM without requiring network and internet connection. The features and functions of both modes are identical. Moreover, print materials are also included as supplementary media.

Originality/value

Since the module is a self‐directed learning or self‐training tool in information retrieval it can be employed for junior library staff and library users; it provides a training tool for librarians to train library users and supports human resource and development to narrow digital divides and support the right to access information.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

T.N. Krishnan

Online education is becoming a major mode of learning, especially for working executives. An assessment of this learning mode is important to evaluate the quality of

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621

Abstract

Purpose

Online education is becoming a major mode of learning, especially for working executives. An assessment of this learning mode is important to evaluate the quality of learning and may provide useful directions to effective management of online learning. This paper aims to focus on these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research methodology was adopted to explore such issues as the reasons for undertaking web‐based executive management education programs, the contributors to the learning effectiveness of such a program, and the individual and organizational expectations for undertaking or supporting such a program.

Findings

It was found that there are some unique results in the Indian web‐based executive education context, especially on the contributors to learning effectiveness. The most commonly mentioned reasons for undertaking an executive management education program are to gain knowledge/skills and to better handle present or future roles, while the most commonly expected outcome after completion refers to personal development/satisfaction and improved performance in the present job. The most important factors contributing to learning effectiveness relate to pedagogical factors and course design factors.

Originality/value

While abundant research exists on web based management education in the Western context, the reasons for undertaking web‐based executive management education programs, the contributors to learning effectiveness of such a program, and the expectations for undertaking such a program are still not well understood in the Indian context. This study provides useful pointers to these questions.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Kate Manuel

Academic librarians have been creating Web‐based tutorials in support of their institutions’ distance education course and remote students for some time. For‐credit…

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1759

Abstract

Academic librarians have been creating Web‐based tutorials in support of their institutions’ distance education course and remote students for some time. For‐credit, distance education, information literacy classes for undergraduate students, however, have not yet begun to appear in significant numbers. In creating such a course, LIBY 3200, California State University, Hayward, sought to meet the needs of its students better and to explore the potential of distance education. Findings from experience teaching LIBY 3200 suggest that many students are less prepared to function – technologically and cognitively – in a Web‐based distance education environment than might be predicted. Design and delivery of course content proved time‐consuming, with few possibilities for short‐cuts, and teaching methods had to be adapted to help the students become autonomous learners, meaningfully capable of self‐directed learning in a Web‐based environment.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Li Zhang

The paper seeks to explore and discuss in detail the application of instructional media features in developing web‐based library instruction in order to strengthen…

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2641

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to explore and discuss in detail the application of instructional media features in developing web‐based library instruction in order to strengthen students' online learning experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper surveys research findings on instructional media features that can be incorporated into library instruction in the web environment. The effective use of media elements such as text, color, graphics, navigation systems, audio, video, as well as the implementation of interaction and feedback, are analyzed. Exemplary illustrations supplement the discussions of guidelines for the design of successful online library tutorials.

Findings

Academic libraries are taking advantage of technological innovations to extend instructional opportunities and enrich traditional classroom‐based bibliographic instruction. Web‐based library instruction requires more than duplicating print instructional materials on the web. Good online information tutorials should effectively incorporate multiple instructional media into the web presence to convey the instruction in multi‐stimulating ways.

Practical implications

The findings of the paper will be helpful to librarians who plan to design and develop web‐based instruction or online tutorials for the greater engagement of students.

Originality/value

The paper provides practical help to librarians in obtaining an understanding of various instructional media capabilities for creating effective online instructional materials.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Anna Marie Johnson and Hannelore B. Rader

Presents a bibliography of literature published during 2001 on library instruction and information literacy. States that the majority of articles dealt with the…

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3647

Abstract

Presents a bibliography of literature published during 2001 on library instruction and information literacy. States that the majority of articles dealt with the implementation of the Association of College and Research Libraries standards for information literacy in higher education. Reveals that another theme is that students are increasingly turning to the Web for their information needs to the exclusion of other sources which has implications for those who teach those resources. Also reveals the theme in the literature of collaboration and partnerships between faculty, information technology staff, other librarians, students and administrators.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2008

Olof Sundin

The purpose of this paper is to show how different approaches to information literacy, such as are mediated through web‐based tutorials, are used as tools in negotiating…

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4932

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how different approaches to information literacy, such as are mediated through web‐based tutorials, are used as tools in negotiating the information‐seeking expertise of university librarians.

Design/methodology/approach

A textual analysis of 31 web‐based Scandinavian tutorials for information literacy has been conducted. The similarities and differences identified are analysed as linguistic expressions of different approaches to information literacy. The approaches are seen as constructions based on a dialogue between the empirical data and the theoretical departure points.

Findings

Four approaches to information literacy emerge in the results: a source approach, a behaviour approach, a process approach, and a communication approach. The approaches entail different perspectives on information literacy. They impart diverging understandings of key concepts such as “information”, “information seeking” and the “user”.

Practical implications

A reflective awareness of different approaches to information literacy is important for both researchers and LIS practitioners, since the approaches that come into play have practical consequences for the operation of user education.

Originality/value

The present study supplements the information literacy research field by combining empirical findings with theoretical reflections.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 64 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

H.P. Wolmarans

The Internet is becoming increasingly important in our daily lives. So, too, is the ease of communication by means of television. The power of these two technological…

Abstract

The Internet is becoming increasingly important in our daily lives. So, too, is the ease of communication by means of television. The power of these two technological tools in education has been combined in so‐called ‘flexible learning’. This study investigates the experience of students in a master’s degree programme in taxation, which is presented by means of flexible learning. In general, students experience this mode of learning very positively and would advise others to enrol for the same course. They acknowledge that the benefits of flexible learning far exceed any possible drawbacks.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1022-2529

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2007

Joyce Pittman

This paper aims to postulate an emerging unified cultural‐convergence framework to converge the delivery of instructional technology and intercultural education (ICE) that…

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3698

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to postulate an emerging unified cultural‐convergence framework to converge the delivery of instructional technology and intercultural education (ICE) that extends beyond web‐learning technologies to inculcate inclusive pedagogy in teacher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the literature and a tech‐infused multicultural learning community to identify what a unified cultural‐convergence theory might consist of and how it could be shaped to align instructional technology and critical ICE in teacher education. Four questions are asked: What key learning do these two disciplines make available to teachers and educators that are essential for today's highly diverse, complex classrooms? What can we draw from a convergence of multiculturalism and global education that will help us derive a new theoretical understanding of a unified cultural‐convergence theory to connect IT and ICE education? What knowledge, skills and dispositions comprise three essential components of this literature synthesis? How can this new unified cultural‐convergence theory and relevant components be taught, practiced, and measured? The paper contains several tables, figures and over 50 sources in the research bibliography that were selected from a review and analysis of 100 documents.

Findings

The paper discovered instructional technology and intercultural educators employed web‐learning technologies in very similar ways to position critical ICE strategies into programs or courses in teacher education. The learning technologies models that were attempting to support multicultural education (MCE)/ICE and IT education included corporate, universities, research centers, schools, and government partners. Reportedly, according to the research, teacher educators in IT education do not employ instructional technology practices that differ from practices that are needed or valued by MCE educators to merge critical intercultural structures into teacher education through web‐learning technologies. This was good news as the researcher moves toward a recommendation for a research agenda that could be shared by educators from the two groups.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited to literature reviews, reports, and evaluation documents.

Originality/value

The paper offers implications for curriculum development in educational technology and MCE using ICTs

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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