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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Andy K.D. Wong and Rong Zhang

This paper aims to identify the challenges of Hong Kong and overseas developers in project management when undertaking real estate projects in China, and then focuses on…

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2129

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the challenges of Hong Kong and overseas developers in project management when undertaking real estate projects in China, and then focuses on how to mitigate and solve the problems. The proposed solution is about a concept of using the IT tool “web‐based construction project management system” (WPMS) to help assuring projects success in China. The study reported in this paper focuses on how to implement WPMS to manage construction projects in China considering the overall situation, limitations and Chinese culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies and interviews were adopted to identify the main reasons why experienced Hong Kong developers have apparently been outperformed by the capital‐deprived local developers in China. SWOT was applied to analyse project failure factors. Afterwards, 49 web‐based construction project management software systems were reviewed to identify their features, their client expectations, the technology propagation modes, and the most emphasized functions in the construction stage. An in‐depth case study was adopted to test the hypothesis that web‐based construction project system could help Hong Kong developers to properly manage their projects in China.

Findings

Cooperation and coordination difficulties among participants caused by long geographical project distance and remote management control were identified to be the main causes of project failure. Web‐based construction project management system was proved to be efficient and effective in cross region project coordination and monitoring. Since property development business is a continuing and non‐one‐off activity, the investment of a tailor made WPMS is really good value for money. Concerning the low readiness of business partners in China, an encouraging pattern with more self‐incentives should be considered for achieving a win‐win‐win situation as an essential tactic as proposed in this paper.

Research limitations/implications

How to evaluate the benefit of using WPMS in quantitative method remains a challenge. Future research could compare the project with WPMS and without WPMS.

Practical implications

The case study of the application of a tailor‐made web‐based project management system (named ICPMS) by one of the major developers in Hong Kong has demonstrated that the headquarters in Hong Kong is able to get timely first hand project information, facilitating timely decisions and ensuring project success. Thus, the adoption of WPMS is a worthwhile investment for overseas developers undertaking real estate development projects in China.

Originality/value

This paper puts forward the concept of overseas developers using WPMS to help assure project success in China. Chinese culture and other limitation factors were considered for the first time in WPMS implementation in the construction industry. How to make the implementation of WPMS to successfully overcome such barriers is illustrated based on this empirical study.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

C. Charoenngam, S.T. Coquinco and B.H.W. Hadikusumo

A change order is an order from an employer authorizing a variation. Success in managing change orders results in uninterrupted construction operations and an agreed final…

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1306

Abstract

A change order is an order from an employer authorizing a variation. Success in managing change orders results in uninterrupted construction operations and an agreed final project cost as well as duration. One of the methods to manage change orders is to establish good communication and cooperation among project team members. Success of this method can be enhanced by developing and utilizing a web‐based change order management system that supports documentation practice, communication and integration between different team members in the change order workflow. This paper discusses our web‐based project management system, change order management system (COMS), to manage change orders using the Internet. In order to show COMS’ potential benefits, a test case was conducted for comparing the COMS with the conventional practice of change order management.

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Construction Innovation, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2013

David A. Jank

The emergence of new and integrated approaches to information technology projects and web-based service initiatives in libraries poses a number of challenges to those who…

Abstract

The emergence of new and integrated approaches to information technology projects and web-based service initiatives in libraries poses a number of challenges to those who manage them. Library managers must work closely with specialists in areas that are not always found within the library, yet there is no evidence-based data documenting the factors involved in doing so. The exploratory study summarized in this chapter documents much of what practitioners and scholars alike consider important in this arena, and contributes to the literature in two ways. First, a meta-analysis of what both practitioners and scholars have found to be important in the areas of technology project management and web-based initiatives is presented that can assist professionals currently developing web-based project launches. Additionally, by using bibliometric techniques as the basis of this analysis, a newly developed taxonomy of these approaches is provided that can assist LIS professionals with future cooperative web-based initiatives. Domain analytic techniques are utilized in the study to examine a selection (n=276) of published articles and papers to ascertain what library and information professionals have learned from embarking on such collaborations. A grounded theory approach is taken in order to develop a working taxonomy of topics and themes relating to collaborative online initiatives. The findings illustrate that library and information science project managers involved in online and web-based initiatives face five key areas of concern: information technology management, information retrieval protocols, user-specific applications, user education, and strategic planning.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Heng Li, Sandy Tang and Peter E.D. Love

Large‐scale projects involve many organizations coming from different geographical locations. The task of coordination and information sharing/exchange therefore becomes…

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1107

Abstract

Large‐scale projects involve many organizations coming from different geographical locations. The task of coordination and information sharing/exchange therefore becomes very challenging. Recently, Web‐based project management systems have been developed and applied in construction project management. Presents an intelligent Web‐based project management system, called VHBuild.com, developed by the authors, which integrates project management, knowledge management and artificial intelligence technologies. First, discusses the advantages of using VHBuild in project management, which is followed by an in‐depth discussion on a number of artificial intelligence techniques. With the intelligent supports embedded in the VHBuild, the decision‐making procedure will no longer appear to be a blind‐searching process and project managers will not only be better informed, but also be given more efficient tools in tackling problems in managing large scale projects.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

K. Ruikar, C.J. Anumba and P.M. Carrillo

Web‐based technologies such as project extranets have introduced a new concept for communication and collaboration during construction projects. Project extranets have…

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2002

Abstract

Purpose

Web‐based technologies such as project extranets have introduced a new concept for communication and collaboration during construction projects. Project extranets have been used in the industry for some time now to manage information and document flows throughout the lifecycle of construction projects. Very few end‐user companies already using project extranets have documented and disseminated information about the implications of using this technology in terms of the impact on their businesses, benefits incurred and possible drawbacks. This paper aims to present findings from the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is case studies conducted with end‐users of a leading project extranet application in the UK.

Findings

Findings suggest that some of the perceived drawbacks of using project extranets are in fact not viewed as drawbacks by end‐user companies. Also, the benefits incurred appear to outweigh some of the issues. The end‐user organisations believe that an increasing number of organisations will be encouraged to use project extranets when they see “visionaries” and “market leaders” such as themselves, benefiting from the technology and leading the way to its wider adoption.

Originality/value

Wider dissemination of this knowledge will encourage more construction companies to adopt the technology which has a proven record of success on projects for which it has been used. The paper highlights the drivers for the adoption of this technology and its impact on end‐user business processes. It also documents the end‐user viewpoint on the benefits and drawbacks of using project extranets.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Stacy Brody

The purpose of this paper is to profile various types of Web-based tools to facilitate research collaboration within and across institutions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to profile various types of Web-based tools to facilitate research collaboration within and across institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Various Web-based tools were tested by the author. Additionally, tutorial videos and guides were reviewed.

Findings

There are various free and low-cost tools available to assist in the collaborative research process, and librarians are well-positioned to facilitate their usage.

Practical implications

Librarians and researchers will learn about various types of tools available at free or at low cost to fulfill needs of the collaborative research process.

Social implications

As the tools highlighted are either free or of low cost, they are also valuable to start-ups and can be recommended for entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

As the realm of Web-based collaborative tools continues to evolve, the options must be continually revisited and reviewed for currency.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2011

Pollaphat Nitithamyong and Mirosław J. Skibniewski

Academics and practitioners anticipated that web‐based project management systems (WPMSs) would enhance and revolutionise the way in which construction‐related…

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4710

Abstract

Purpose

Academics and practitioners anticipated that web‐based project management systems (WPMSs) would enhance and revolutionise the way in which construction‐related organisations conduct business. However, widespread adoption and effective use have not reached expected levels partly because of a lack of comprehensive understanding on how to implement WPMSs avoiding pitfalls and failure. This paper aims to investigate the rationale behind WPMS performance deviations in order to suggest ways to effectively employ WPMSs in construction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Three project‐level case studies were undertaken representing a highly successful, a moderately successful, and an unsuccessful WPMS implementation. For each case, WPMS implementation and operational issues were examined, followed by a detailed investigation on the key factors affecting the WPMS application. The findings from the three case studies were then compared and analysed.

Findings

The case studies reveal a clear pattern related to WPMS performance in relation to a number of issues. Following this pattern, the study identifies “basic” requirements as well as “important” and “key” factors for a successful WPMS implementation. The conclusions from the case studies suggest ways in which construction project teams can reap greater benefits from using WPMSs in their work.

Originality/value

The findings reported herein will benefit construction practitioners by guiding them to more productive ways of utilising and managing WPMSs, thereby promoting widespread acceptance of such systems in the industry.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

B. Tunçer, R. Stouffs and S. Sariyildiz

Web‐based document management applications serve to store, organize, and manage a collection of documents within the context of a building project. The organization of…

Abstract

Web‐based document management applications serve to store, organize, and manage a collection of documents within the context of a building project. The organization of documents, using mechanisms for indexing and relating these, aims to build an information structure that supports effective searching and browsing. We present a methodology for a stronger integration of project documents of different formats into a rich, highly interrelated, information structure. Specifically, we propose a decomposition of project documents by content in relation to a semantic structure for the categorization of document components. We consider a notion of typologies from architecture as a guide for constructing such a semantic structure. We discuss the application of this methodology to building projects, and propose its use in Web‐based document management applications in the AEC industry. As an illustration of this methodology, we describe a prototype application, as a presentation tool for architectural analyses in an educational context.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Marcus Jefferies, Graham John Brewer and Thayaparan Gajendran

There has been a significant increase in the use of relationship contracting in the global construction industry, with strategies such as Partnering, Alliancing and…

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2526

Abstract

Purpose

There has been a significant increase in the use of relationship contracting in the global construction industry, with strategies such as Partnering, Alliancing and Public-Private Partnerships all used. These approaches were introduced to the Australian construction industry in the 1990s in an attempt to overcome the adversarial nature of traditional contracting methods. The purpose of this paper is to investigate factors that influence the successful implementation of Project Alliancing by means of a case study approach focusing on the procurement of a large water treatment plant. The research findings identify critical success factors (CSFs) both from literature and the case study project.

Design/methodology/approach

The research traces the origins of Alliancing and identifies CSFs by reviewing literature and analysing a current case study project. The paper first identifies CSFs on a global scale by establishing a theoretical framework of CSFs and then compares this to the case study project. A case study of an Australian Alliance project is investigated whereby a semi-structured interview process, involving senior managers from the six partners from the Alliance, was used in conjunction with a review of project documentation. The findings of the case study project are compared to the literature and any new CSFs are identified.

Findings

Alliancing helps to establish and manage the relationships between all parties, remove barriers and encourage maximum contribution to achieve success. Alliancing provides a project delivery method that promotes open communication, equality and a systematic problem resolution process. Team culture focusing on an “open book/no blame” approach is vital to the success of an Alliance. Five CSFs were identified as specifically influencing the success of the case study project: the use of an integrated Alliance office; the staging of project and stretch targets; establishing project specific key performance indicators; facilitating on-going workshops; and the integration of a web-based management programme.

Originality/value

The research findings assist both public and private sectors by identifying factors that are critical for success in Alliancing. Five additional factors were identified as specifically influencing the success of the case study project. Since this research was conducted, Australia has seen a further increase in relationship contracting where the likes of Alliancing is often used as the default approach for certain Public Sector projects. Ongoing research into Alliancing is vital to ensure the development of sustainable procurement models, successful operational viability, fair risk distribution and value for money.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Mark Jeffery, Derek Yung and Alex Gershbeyn

The case is based on a real $25 million project at a major U.S.-based computer manufacturer. For confidentiality reasons the company has been disguised as A&D High Tech…

Abstract

The case is based on a real $25 million project at a major U.S.-based computer manufacturer. For confidentiality reasons the company has been disguised as A&D High Tech. The Web-based online ordering system project is required by sales and marketing for the fall holiday season. If the project misses this window, the firm will lose substantial market share to competitors. The A&D High Tech case examines how to create and analyze a project plan in Microsoft Project. Specifically, data is given to build the project plan step-by-step and then analyze the plan using the Microsoft project management tool. In order to make the case manageable for students we reduced the size of the project, and corresponding number of resources, to approximately $1 million, but retained all of the features of the original project. The project plan that students construct from the data given in the case is fraught with risks, and students must apply risk management techniques to diagnose the plan. Ultimately, students must answer the management question: Will the project be completed for the holiday shopping season? This case is the first in a series; the second is the case entitled “A&D High Tech (B): Managing Scope Change.” The case can also be taught using other project management software tools, such as Primavera.

The case teaches students how to build a project plan in Microsoft Project (or other project management software tools). More important, the case teaches prospective executives how to analyze a project plan and identify risks of the plan, and define strategies to mitigate these risks. Students learn that in the planning stage of any project the risks are highest, but this is the best opportunity for proactive management intervention.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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