Search results

1 – 10 of over 9000
Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Mingzhuo Liu

The purpose of this paper is to explore how to design a web‐based course in the context of China for self‐directed learning from four perspectives – i.e. pedagogical…

1204

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how to design a web‐based course in the context of China for self‐directed learning from four perspectives – i.e. pedagogical, psychological, social and technological – and also to summarize the design principles for the web‐based course.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews literature related to: self‐directed learning, with a view to bringing out its capabilities and capacities for use in a web‐based environment; theories and pedagogies of learning with a view to imbuing them for the design of web‐based courses; and challenges of the design of web‐based courses with a view to gauging its acceptability.

Findings

The development of a successful web‐based course needs to focus on multiple perspectives — pedagogical, psychological, social and technological – in order to contextualize it for learner‐centeredness. The results show that the course designed based on these dimensions was flexible, useful and welcomed.

Originality/value

This paper describes a conceptual framework for designing a web‐based course from four perspectives and also presents a series of design principles for a web‐based course.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2004

Marie‐Michèle Boulet

Design prescriptions to create web‐based courses and sites that are dynamic, easy‐to‐use, interactive and data‐driven, emerge from a “how to do it” approach…

Abstract

Design prescriptions to create web‐based courses and sites that are dynamic, easy‐to‐use, interactive and data‐driven, emerge from a “how to do it” approach. Unfortunately, the theory behind these methods, prescriptions, procedures or tools, is rarely provided and the important terms, such as “easy‐to‐use”, to which these prescriptions refer are not defined. The empirical results reported here bring lighting on the meaning of several design prescriptions that contain qualitative attributes. This paper aims at clarifying the meaning of several web‐based course design prescriptions found in the literature in the context of two music web‐based courses. Two examples are presented and the results of the students’ assessment regarding several design prescriptions are given. First, what we learned while producing the first release of the web part of an undergraduate music course entitled Teaching and Music Technology is presented. Then, what else we learned when the second release was assessed by students is detailed. The next part concerns what we used while developing the undergraduate music course French‐Canadian folk which gives access to several music files and scores. Again the results of the students’ assessment are presented. The list of the various technologies that must be highly mastered to produce such musical content is given.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Ruben Estevez, Sean Rankin, Ricardo Silva and

University students use web-based course registration systems to search, select, and register to courses. Despite having an important role at universities, course

1030

Abstract

Purpose

University students use web-based course registration systems to search, select, and register to courses. Despite having an important role at universities, course registration systems often pose usability problems to users. In this project, the authors assessed the usability of a web-based course registration system, proposed an improved model for such systems, and evaluated the model. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a series of user studies to achieve the objectives. First, the authors performed a usability study to evaluate the course registration system at MacEwan University (myStudentSystem). Based on the study results, the authors designed and developed a prototype that addresses the limitations of the system. Second, the authors conducted a usability test to get feedback on the prototype and improve its design features accordingly. Finally, the authors performed a summative evaluation to assess the usability of the prototype and myStudentSystem.

Findings

The summative evaluation results showed that the design improved the overall system usability and user satisfaction. Most participants preferred the prototype to myStudentSystem.

Research limitations/implications

The authors tested the prototype in controlled experimental settings, and the participants were limited to undergraduate students at MacEwan University. These conditions may limit the generalizability of the results. Further studies that deploy and test the prototype in the real world are necessary to validate findings.

Originality/value

Based on the studies, the authors outline guidelines for designing web-based course registration systems and advocate the use of new technologies to create highly interactive web applications. The authors' model can assist software developers in designing and implementing web-based course registration systems at universities.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Joanna Jedrzejowicz and Jakub Neumann

This paper seeks to describe XML technologies and to show how they can be applied for developing web‐based courses and supporting authors who do not have much experience…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to describe XML technologies and to show how they can be applied for developing web‐based courses and supporting authors who do not have much experience with the preparation of web‐based courses.

Design/methodology/approach

When developing online courses the academic staff has to address the following problem – how to keep pace with the ever‐changing technology. Using XML technologies helps to develop a learning environment which can be useful for academics when designing web‐based courses, preparing the materials and then reusing them.

Findings

The paper discusses the benefits of using XML for developing computer‐based courses. The task of introducing new versions of existing courses can be reduced to editing appropriate XML files without any need for program change and an author can perform this task easily from a computer connected to the internet. What is more – using XML makes it possible to reuse data in different teaching situations.

Research limitations/implications

The environment has only been used for two years and further research is needed on how user‐friendly the system really is and how it can still be improved.

Practical implications

The paper describes the environment which can be used to develop and reuse online materials, courses, metadata etc.

Originality/value

The paper offers practical help to academics interested in web‐based teaching.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Panagiotis Zaharias and Angeleiki Poulymenakou

New requirements for the design of interactive systems call for a human‐centred approach. Learner‐centred design has been considered as the equivalent of human (or user…

Abstract

New requirements for the design of interactive systems call for a human‐centred approach. Learner‐centred design has been considered as the equivalent of human (or user) centred design as it applies to the design and development of elearning systems and applications. E‐Learning is gaining momentum and the respective interest in design methods and practices for such systems is continuously increasing. Nevertheless it is not clear how learner‐centred design can be implemented in practice; questions, such as what are the processes included in learner‐centred design, what kind of activities should take place, how can existing human‐centred design methodologies be combined with instructional design methods and techniques, remain unanswered. This paper stresses the need for an effective integration between usability ‐ the ultimate goal for every human‐centred design effort ‐ and instructional design concepts, techniques and practices. It presents a case study where authors’ activities to design a web‐based training curriculum are described. Problems and challenges of applying human‐centred design and instructional design methods and techniques are discussed along with future research dimensions.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2015

Anne Guptill

This chapter discusses a bottom-up design strategy to support the principles of Universal Design and Universal Design for Learning adapted for online course development…

Abstract

This chapter discusses a bottom-up design strategy to support the principles of Universal Design and Universal Design for Learning adapted for online course development. The concept of Universal Design demands a holistic, bottom-up instructional design model for online course development that integrates technology, accessibility, recent instructional and learning theories, and a participatory postmodern worldview. This study is intended for faculty, instructional designers, administrators, assistive technology staff, and Web multimedia software vendors associated with higher education. The research assists these target audiences to design and develop online courses that are accessible without special adaptation or modification. The components of Universal Design for online learning support newer emergent approaches to instructional design, various programming solutions used in the software engineering field for efficiency, Universal Design for Learning, and legal guidelines associated with accessibility.

Details

Accessible Instructional Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-288-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

H.P. Wolmarans

The Internet is becoming increasingly important in our daily lives. So, too, is the ease of communication by means of television. The power of these two technological…

Abstract

The Internet is becoming increasingly important in our daily lives. So, too, is the ease of communication by means of television. The power of these two technological tools in education has been combined in so‐called ‘flexible learning’. This study investigates the experience of students in a master’s degree programme in taxation, which is presented by means of flexible learning. In general, students experience this mode of learning very positively and would advise others to enrol for the same course. They acknowledge that the benefits of flexible learning far exceed any possible drawbacks.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1022-2529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Nelly Conte

The paper's aim is to describe the first experiences of, opinions and attitudes toward, continuing education using the internet of a group of Puerto Rican pharmacists…

621

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to describe the first experiences of, opinions and attitudes toward, continuing education using the internet of a group of Puerto Rican pharmacists after an online course.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a descriptive study using a focus group of practicing pharmacists who participated in continuing education using the internet for the first time.

Findings

The participants' descriptions and impressions with regard to online continuing education (CE) experiences were both emphatic and covered all aspects of the process, from accessing the CE site to selecting a topic to reading the content and answering the questions. Pharmacists recognized the importance and advantages of online CE, but demonstrated preference for live CE. Lack of technical skills is still a limitation, especially the lack of internet navigation skills.

Research limitations/implications

The recruiting methodology did not result in a sufficient number of participants for the two sessions that were planned which highlighted some of the cultural aspects of the process of inviting professionals to attend and participate in a focus group. Even though only one focus group was conducted, the systematic approach garnered detailed and valuable information.

Practical implications

Strong preferences for live CE, the need for socializing, and time‐management issues were identified as being barriers to participating in CE that educators, professional associations and CE providers can address. Continuing education designers and providers must carefully design their web pages and courses to increase its quality, to facilitate taking a CE, to increase satisfaction, and to increase recurrent use.

Originality/value

The paper presents the reactions of a group of adult professionals as they encounter a new learning experience by means of the internet.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

V.K.J. Jeevan and P. Padhi

To provide a selective bibliography in the emerging area of library content personalization for the benefit of library and information professionals.

2445

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a selective bibliography in the emerging area of library content personalization for the benefit of library and information professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of recently published works (in the period 1993–2004), which aim to provide pragmatic application of content personalization rather than theoretical works, are discussed and sorted into “classified” sections to help library professionals understand more about the various options for formulating content as per the specific needs of their clientele.

Findings

This paper provides information about each category of tool and technique of personalization, indicating what is achieved and how particular developments can help other libraries or professionals. It recognises that personalization of library resources is a viable way of helping users deal with the information explosion, conserving their time for more productive intellectual tasks. It identifies how computer and information technology has enabled document mapping to be more efficient, especially because of the ease with which a document can be indexed and represented with multiple terms, and confirms that this same functionality can be used to represent a user's interests, facilitating the easy linking of relevant sources to prospective users. Personalization of library resources is an effective way for maximizing user benefit.

Research limitations/implications

This is not an exhaustive list of developments in personalization. Rather it identifies a mix of products and solutions that are of immediate use to librarians.

Practical implications

A very useful source of pragmatic applications of personalization so far, that can guide a practicing professional interested in creating similar solutions for more productive information support in his/her library.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need for a “review of technology” for LIS practitioners and offers practical help to any professional exploring solutions similar to those outlined in this paper.

Details

Library Review, vol. 55 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Randa Diab-Bahman, Abrar Al-Enzi, Wael Sharafeddine and Sapheya Aftimos

This paper aims to examine the correlation between academic performance and attendance of e-learning, away from the conventional classroom setting.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the correlation between academic performance and attendance of e-learning, away from the conventional classroom setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigates the impact of attendance in the final grades of 389 undergraduate first- and second-year undergraduates taking Business Management classes online for the first time over the span of three consecutive academic semesters during an academic year.

Findings

The results show that there was a negative correlation between attendance and grades. However, splitting the results by year provided some insightful information as there was a difference between the relationships for first- and second-year students. Therefore, it can be concluded that both attendance and the year of the students did have a statistically significant influence on grades.

Originality/value

Although the impact of students' attendance on their academic performance has not been the subject of extensive research, especially in the field of Management studies and in an online delivery medium, it is likely to be of interest to academics and policymakers as the pandemic continues to make e-learning more popular.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 9000