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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

Diane Rose Keeble-Ramsay and Andrew Armitage

The paper aims to report initial empirical research that examines UK employees’ perceptions of the changing nature of work since the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) to…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to report initial empirical research that examines UK employees’ perceptions of the changing nature of work since the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) to consider how the financial context may have constrained HRD practice and more sustainable approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus group research was facilitated through collective group discussion. Through template analysis of the findings, thematic analysis was undertaken to extend prior research. Themes used by Hassard et al. (2009) in terms of the changing nature of the workplace between 2000 and 2008, were used to provide new data on HRD realities.

Findings

Participants reported diminishing personal control over changes within the workplace and a cultural shift towards a harsher work climate. HRD was considered as silenced or absent and associated solely with low cost-based e-learning rather than acting in strategic role supporting sustainable business objectives.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst providing only indications from employee perceptions, the research identifies a weakened HRD function. The key contribution of this paper lies with empirical evidence of post-GFC constraints placed upon HRD strategies. It further identifies whether alternative development approaches, mediated by organisational learning capabilities, might emancipate UK HRD.

Social implications

This paper engenders a debate around the status of HRD within the UK organisations, further to the global financial crisis (GFC), where HRD might be viewed as at a juncture to argue a need for a shift from a financialised mode for people management towards one of greater people focus.

Originality/value

This research provides initial findings of the impact of the economic climate. It considers new approaches which might resolve expiring HRD through more sustainable practices.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Meera Alagaraja

The purpose of this article is to outline the role of human resource development (HRD) in Lean strategy as the context for assessing interactions with internal customers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to outline the role of human resource development (HRD) in Lean strategy as the context for assessing interactions with internal customers. Identifying the perceived gap in role expectations and fulfillment emphasizes important priorities and offers tangible measures for assessing HRD contributions. A focus on business strategies such as Lean enhances HRD's strategic value. Central to the study is the proposition that HRD value and effectiveness revolves around the perceptions of key internal stakeholders in the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

This study explores internal customer perceptions of HRD in a select organization using a qualitative case study method. Key stakeholders responsible for Lean implementation were identified as internal customers. Further, the focus on Lean helped to narrow the scope of the investigation. Interactions between key stakeholders and HRD professionals during Lean implementation were assessed.

Findings

The findings from the study suggest that effectively performing transactional responsibilities (reducing employee relations incidences, errors in processing routines) not only strengthen transactions effectiveness, but also enhance HRD's capacity for strategic involvement in the organization. Involvement in Lean strategy was considered critical as it highlights opportunities for increased strategic involvement for HRD. A new finding from the study suggests that a focus on HRD's strategic value also enhances transaction effectiveness. Further, ignoring, excluding or undervaluing HRD role and involvement in business strategy adversely affects organizational effectiveness.

Practical implications

Communication of role expectations between organizational group members (HRD and internal customers) would reduce the level of disagreement, reduce potential conflict and enhance the value and effectiveness of HRD. In order to pursue this line of thinking in practice, the study recommends HRD practitioners to become intentional about the selection and development of potential business partners in the organization.

Originality/value

The study suggests that HRD's transactional responsibilities influence customers' perceptions of HRD's capacity for a strategic role in the organization. Effectively performing transactional responsibilities not only enhances HRD effectiveness but also offers opportunities for increasing HRD's added value to the organization. A new finding from the study also suggests that a focus on the strategic value enhances HRD effectiveness in organizations.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

– This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Participants reported diminishing personal control over changes within the workplace and a cultural shift toward a harsher working climate in the UK following the global financial crisis. Human resource development was considered as silenced or absent and associated solely with low cost-based e-learning rather than acting in a strategic role to support sustainable business objectives.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Hazel Kershaw-Solomon, Nick Beech, Jeff Gold, Julia Claxton, Tricia Auty and Susan Beech

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact competency frameworks as standardisation can have on the employee engagement of academic staff within higher education…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact competency frameworks as standardisation can have on the employee engagement of academic staff within higher education (HE) through their employment as managerial tools.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review is conducted from which the conditions for effective competency frameworks are evaluated and the influence of changes in the HE environment in the form of political agendas and tight resources are explored.

Findings

This paper provides insights into the dynamics of public service modernisation and the tensions between the dominant discourse of managerialism and the degree of agency afforded to professional academics. It highlights the relevance of informal peer relationships in setting the climate to generate collegial bonding and professional engagement that underpin successful teacher fellowship accreditations. It further highlights the key role managers play in this process and provides a conceptual framework highlighting the dynamics and combined effect of employee engagement and competency frameworks set within complex HE environment.

Practical implications

This paper brings together the prerequisites for effective implementation of competency frameworks to implement successful employee engagement strategies set within the complexities of the HE context, which has not been studied to date. Armed with such insights, Human Resource Development (HRD) departments and universities can implement competency assessments that generate greater staff engagement.

Originality/value

The paper provides a critical approach in reviewing the impact of Continued Professional Development and its link to professional status and thus helps British Universities and others to understand how the mechanisms at work affect engagement levels of academic staff. Armed with this depth of understanding of how the change initiative works, with whom and under what circumstances, universities will be better able to meet target UK Professional Standards Framework membership levels required by the higher education academy (HEA) and, subsequently, the HEA to meet their targets for the government.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

John M. Trussel and Patricia A. Patrick

This paper investigates the financial risk factors associated with fiscal distress in local governments. We hypothesize that fiscal distress is positively correlated with…

Abstract

This paper investigates the financial risk factors associated with fiscal distress in local governments. We hypothesize that fiscal distress is positively correlated with revenue concentration and debt usage, while negatively correlated with administrative costs and entity resources. The regression model results in a prediction of the likelihood of fiscal distress, which correctly classifies up to 91% of the sample as fiscally distressed or not. The model also allows for an analysis of the impact of a change in a risk factor on the likelihood of fiscal distress. A decrease in intergovernmental revenues as a percent of total revenues and an increase in administrative expenditures as a percent of total expenditures have the biggest influences on reducing the likelihood of fiscal distress.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Martin McCracken and Mary Wallace

Revisits the literature on strategic human resource development (SHRD) in the context of Garavan’s work on the characteristics of SHRD. A conceptual framework is…

Abstract

Revisits the literature on strategic human resource development (SHRD) in the context of Garavan’s work on the characteristics of SHRD. A conceptual framework is constructed that redefines SHRD stressing a shaping rather than supporting role for HRD in relation to corporate strategy. The concept of strategic maturity in HRD is examined linking the work of Garavan; Lee and McCracken; and Wallace. The resulting model of strategic maturity is then analysed empirically using data from a major questionnaire and interview survey. A new model of strategic partnerships in HRD is then proposed.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Martin McCracken and Mary Wallace

Reviews the literature on strategic human resource development (SHRD) and explores the concept specifically in the context of the work of Garavan (1991), which…

Abstract

Reviews the literature on strategic human resource development (SHRD) and explores the concept specifically in the context of the work of Garavan (1991), which highlighted nine key characteristics of SHRD. Garavan’s seminal paper is used as a starting point from which to examine the development of the concept of SHRD. By examining and reviewing the literature, the nine characteristics are redefined and enhanced, thus moving towards a new model and definition of SHRD. Concludes by defining SHRD as the creation of a learning culture, within which a range of training, development and learning strategies both respond to corporate strategy and also help to shape and influence it. It is the reciprocal, mutually enhancing, nature of the relationship between HRD and corporate strategy which lies at the heart of SHRD and at the heart of the development of a learning culture.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Richa Chaudhary, Santosh Rangnekar and Mukesh Kumar Barua

Improving work engagement can have significant implications for performance at individual, team and organisational level. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Improving work engagement can have significant implications for performance at individual, team and organisational level. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of occupational self efficacy and human resource development (HRD) climate on work engagement among business executives of select business organisations in India. In addition, it aims to attempt to examine the mediating effect of HRD climate on self efficacy and work engagement relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 150 business executives from both public and private sector manufacturing and service organisations in India. Data were collected through both personal visits and online questionnaires. Correlation and regression analyses were used to test the research hypotheses. Specifically, Baron and Kenny's method was used for testing the hypotheses of mediation.

Findings

A significant relationship was found between all variables in the study. All the study hypotheses were supported. HRD climate was found to partially mediate the relationship between occupational self‐efficacy and work engagement. Interestingly, both HRD climate and self‐efficacy affect work engagement both directly and indirectly through influencing the other.

Practical implications

Work engagement requires the workforce that is endorsed with self‐efficacy as dispositional trait. In addition, improving the HRD climate can have significant implications for enhancing the work engagement among Indian business executives.

Originality/value

By investigating the relationship between self‐efficacy, HRD climate and work engagement the present study made an effort to fulfil the gap in academic literature where there is a significant dearth of academic literature on work engagement from developing economies.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Greg G. Wang

This study sets out to investigate the e‐learning participation and completion phenomenon in the US corporate HRD online communities and to explore determinants of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sets out to investigate the e‐learning participation and completion phenomenon in the US corporate HRD online communities and to explore determinants of e‐learning completion.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the HRD Learning Participation Theory (LPT), this study takes a two‐stage approach. Stage one adopts an interview approach to selected e‐learning managers and to bridge the LPT with empirical data for stage two; stage two develops a survey questionnaire for collecting e‐learning completion related data. Statistical techniques are used for data analysis.

Findings

The study finds that the e‐learning completion rate is significantly higher in the online HRD communities than those reported in the popular media. The results show that e‐learning completion is influenced by individual, organizational, and learning process factors and variables. Environmental factors also influence the completion rate to a certain degree.

Research limitations/implications

The data were obtained from HRD online communities in the USA. Generalization of the results should be exercised with caution. The study offers implications to HRD research and theory building as an example covering the conceptualization, operationalization, and application phases.

Practical implications

Organizational policies, workload during learning process, e‐learning location in terms of home vs workplace, among others, are significant determinants of the e‐learning completion rate. Organizations should consider these factors when implementing e‐learning interventions.

Originality/value

The study fills a gap in the HRD e‐learning literature. While most research on corporate e‐learning is focused on technology features or instructional design, little attention has been paid to whether learners can complete planned e‐learning. The study also contributes to HRD theory building.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

Yonjoo Cho and Gary N. McLean

The purpose of this paper is to identify South Korea's successful IT start‐ups' HRD practices to determine whether there are steps that must be taken to maintain their HRD

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify South Korea's successful IT start‐ups' HRD practices to determine whether there are steps that must be taken to maintain their HRD expertise for continued growth.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach employing four fast‐growing IT start‐up cases was undertaken based on semi‐structured interviews with HR managers and CEOs, supported by site visit observations and archival sources.

Findings

The emergent themes resulting from an analysis of the four cases are adjusting to changing markets (globalization), the founder effect, workforce development, organizational culture, and challenges. These case studies show the importance of organizational culture for IT start‐ups' continued growth.

Research limitations/implications

Although the paper employed multiple cases for comparison, through focusing on only four cases, the results are contextualized and, thus, are limited in generalization.

Practical implications

The fast‐growing IT firms should carefully choose HRD practices to manage and develop their talent because these practices may shape the firms' innovative organizational culture, which, in turn, affects the firm's continued growth.

Originality/value

These case studies contribute to research on South Korea's IT start‐ups by detailing how HRD practices have supported the success of the four IT start‐ups over the past ten years. The paper adds qualitative details to previous studies' quantitative analysis of start‐ups.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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