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Abstract

Details

SDG6 – Clean Water and Sanitation: Balancing the Water Cycle for Sustainable Life on Earth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-103-3

Article
Publication date: 14 February 2022

Arman Firoz Velani, Vaibhav S. Narwane and Bhaskar B. Gardas

This paper aims to identify the role of internet of things (IoT) in water supply chain management and helps to understand its future path from the junction of computer…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the role of internet of things (IoT) in water supply chain management and helps to understand its future path from the junction of computer science and resource management.

Design/methodology/approach

The current research was studied through bibliometric review and content analysis, and various contributors and linkages were found. Also, the possible directions and implications of the field were analyzed.

Findings

The paper’s key findings include the role of modern computer science in water resource management through sensor technology, big data analytics, IoT, machine learning and cloud computing. This, in turn, helps in understanding future implications of IoT resource management.

Research limitations/implications

A more extensive database can add up to more combinations of linkages and ideas about the future direction. The implications and understanding gained by the research can be used by governments and firms dealing with water management of smart cities. It can also help find ways for optimizing water resources using IoT and modern-day computer science.

Originality/value

This study is one of the very few investigations that highlighted IoT’s role in water supply management. Thus, this study helps to assess the scope and the trend of the case area.

Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2013

Silvana Signori and Gerald Avondo Bodino

The aim of this chapter is to determine the need for water management and accounting.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this chapter is to determine the need for water management and accounting.

Design/methodology/approach

This chapter first gives an overview of water-related business risks and exposes the need for sound corporate water management and accounting; it then critically examines water-related issues from an accountability perspective. Furthermore, it gives an overview of Australian Standardised Water Accounting (SWA) and General Purpose Water Accounting (GPWA) as possible practices to strengthen water disclosure.

Findings

The present study confirms the need for, and the importance of, transparent, high-quality, credible and comparable water disclosure. Water is considered a public good and involves a public interest and, consequently, public responsibility for its usage, management and protection. Following this line of reasoning, the chapter draws attention to the need for accountability to be ‘public’ or at least shared between crucial stakeholders (government – at national and international levels, water industries, communities, environmentalists, NGOs, etc.).

Practical and social implications

Company efforts are commonly focused on internal and self-referred operations. The different and conflicting uses that may be made of water, and the fact that water is geographically and temporally sensitive, necessitate a search for more flexible and more extended forms of accountability. An implication of these findings is the need and opportunity to switch focus from a single/private perspective to a more general/public one, with benefits for all the stakeholders.

Originality/value

This research enhances our understanding of water management and accounting and may serve as a sound base for future studies on this challenging topic.

Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2007

Frank Messner, Hagen Koch and Michael Kaltofen

In this chapter it is shown how economic evaluation algorithms of water use can be integrated into a long-term water management model such that surface-water availability…

Abstract

In this chapter it is shown how economic evaluation algorithms of water use can be integrated into a long-term water management model such that surface-water availability and economic evaluation of various levels of water availability to different uses can be modeled simultaneously. This approach makes it possible to include essential features of economic analyses of water use into water resource modeling and thus improves the capability of such models to support decision making in water management. This is especially relevant for the implementation of the Water Framework Directive, which requires economic analyses to be included in the decision process about future water management strategies.

The water management simulation model WBalMo is presented and the integration of economic-evaluation algorithms is demonstrated for the examples of surface-water use for fish farming and for filling open-cast mining pits in order to achieve acceptable water-quality levels in the emerging pit lakes. Results of applying this integrated evaluation approach are shown for different water management scenarios under conditions of global change in the East German Spree and Schwarze Elster river basins, where water scarcity is an urgent issue. Among the lessons which are drawn by the authors one lesson reads that integrating economic evaluation algorithms into a pre-existing model might bring enormous problems. Therefore, such model approaches should be developed together by water engineers and economists in an interdisciplinary endeavor right from the start.

Details

Ecological Economics of Sustainable Watershed Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-507-9

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2018

Sanja Stojkovic Zlatanovic, Milan Stojkovic and Mihailo Mitkovic

The purpose of this paper is to set out the policy guidelines and recommendations to harmonise the Serbian water legislation with European Union standards in the area of…

1447

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out the policy guidelines and recommendations to harmonise the Serbian water legislation with European Union standards in the area of water system management as impacted by climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

The EU Water Framework Directive is analysed in the context of implementation of the integrated water management policy presented in the Serbian Water Law (2010), as well as the National Water Management Strategy (2016). It has been found that the water management legislation that deals with the impact of climate change on water resources is incomplete. Although there are numerous challenges related to research of climate change and water systems, water policy and legal aspects cannot be neglected. The so-called soft law instruments represented in a form of strategy documents could be a valuable response in terms of an adaptive and integrated water policy approach.

Findings

The research is applied to a case study of the Velika Morava River Basin, at Ljubicevski Most hydrological station. Long-term projections suggest a decrease in annual precipitation levels and annual flows up to the year 2100 for climatic scenarios A1B and A2, accompanied by a rapid increase in air temperatures.

Originality/value

This study proposes a water management policy and provides recommendations for the Velika Morava River Basin as impacted by climate change, according to the European Union legislation.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Matthew Egan and Gloria Agyemang

In recent decades, governments in developing countries have experienced relentless pressure from key supranational finance providers (particularly the World Bank) to focus…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent decades, governments in developing countries have experienced relentless pressure from key supranational finance providers (particularly the World Bank) to focus on the achievement of financial efficiency. This pressure persists despite evidence that basic institutions necessary for sustainable infrastructure and competitive commercial arrangements are often not present. This paper aims to examine the steering of urban water management in Ghana as it progressed through a first failed public-private partnership in this sector (from 2005 to 2011), and beyond to 2017. Throughout this 12-year period, the authors consider progress and barriers to the achievement of steering for sustainable development.

Design/methodology/approach

Publicly available documentation is examined through the lens of steering for sustainable development (Voß et al., 2007) to consider the challenges of urban water management between 2005 and 2017.

Findings

Progress towards a more sustainable approach to urban water management was achieved through greater democratic governance, public accountability and public engagement. This acted as a counter foil to power and affected improvements of knowledge and clarity of related goals. Effective sustainable management continued to be challenged, however, by on-going World Bank pressure to focus on financial efficiency.

Practical implications

The provision of a sustainable water supply continues to be a significant challenge for many developing countries, including Ghana. This study provides insights into how progress beyond crippling financial dependency might begin to be achieved.

Social implications

Safe and sustainable water supply is critical for both the health and economic progress of citizens in developing countries such as Ghana. This study provides insight into the value of drawing from a broad range of stakeholders in seeking viable pathways towards those goals.

Originality/value

While water management challenges for developing countries have been significantly researched, particularly in the context of private financing arrangements, little empirical insight is provided into how governments can move forward with sustainable progress beyond the failure of such arrangements. Water management in Ghana beyond 2011 provides that unique context.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2018

Admire Mutsa Nyamwanza

The study aims to explore institutional adaptation for sustainable water resources management at the local level in the context of increasing climate-related challenges in…

2210

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore institutional adaptation for sustainable water resources management at the local level in the context of increasing climate-related challenges in Zimbabwe using the case of a semi-arid area in the mid-Zambezi Valley, north of the country.

Design/methodology/approach

Inspired by the critical institutionalism approach, the study uses qualitative methods (i.e. key informant interviews, semi-structured interviews, community workshops and documentary review) to understand the role of different formal and informal water-related institutions vis-à-vis responding to climate-related challenges in the case study area, and how the identified institutions can improve their efforts in the context of national water and environmental policy and regulation frameworks. Thematic analysis was used for data analysis.

Findings

The study found that climatic challenges in the case study area, as in most of rural Africa, have raised the stakes in local water management with respect to regulating access to and balancing competing interests in, and demands for, water. It ultimately argues for the embracing of complexity thinking and flexibility in local water management as well as clear coordination of institutions across scales in the face of increasing climate-related challenges.

Originality/value

The study adds to case studies and evidence-based analyses focused on institutional alternatives for climate adaptation vis-à-vis water resources management in water-stressed rural African communities.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Janey V. Camp, Mark D. Abkowitz and Eugene J. LeBoeuf

The purpose of this paper is to assess the issues faced by managers of inland waterways in the Southeastern USA as a guide for improvements to spill management information systems.

605

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the issues faced by managers of inland waterways in the Southeastern USA as a guide for improvements to spill management information systems.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to a group of over 300 professionals representing multiple organizations involved in water quality management and/or spill response in the Southeast region of the USA to query their perceptions on leading demands and issues faced in management of inland waterways both on a daily basis and during spill response efforts.

Findings

Survey results indicated that communication is often the “weak link” in both water management and spill response activities, and that enhanced spill management information tools could serve as a valuable resource in addressing this problem. Display of spatial/visual information was deemed to be especially important to spill response personnel and should be included in the next generation of spill response systems.

Research limitations/implications

The scope is limited to the Southeastern USA, but similar results would be expected in other regions where management of surface water is of concern.

Practical implications

In these trying economic times, the survey results serve to rank order decision‐support priorities to which available resources should be allocated and indicate areas of interest for improved support in both water resource management and spill response.

Originality/value

The paper provides the first documentation of the demands and decision‐support priorities of inland waterway resource managers and spill response personnel.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Jorge Alejandro Silva-Rodríguez de San Miguel

The purpose of this paper is to explore water management practices in four criteria – access to potable water; despoilment or pollution levels; grade of sanitation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore water management practices in four criteria – access to potable water; despoilment or pollution levels; grade of sanitation architecture; and grade of delivery architecture – in a variety of different Latin American and European nations to establish techniques that are currently been utilised in Europe that could improve water management in Latin America.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of the available literature on water management in Europe and Latin America is performed to uncover differences and similarities in Latin American and European nations. The documents find are mostly recent, ranging from the last five years (2012-2016).

Findings

Some best practices from Europe cannot be applied in Latin America due to lack of funding. Fortunately, this is likely to change, as many Latin American nations’ economies are rapidly improving. Tentative recommendations include installing a system of pipeline that passes through all rural areas, and governments partnering with local businesses to provide sanitation, and regular sanitation and environmental inspections to minimise water pollution. It is also advisable for serious consideration to be given to achieving a measure of universality vis-à-vis water management standards across Latin America.

Originality/value

There is limited information in literature on the analysis of water management in Europe and Latin America, so this paper serves as a reference to fill the gaps, mainly in Latin America because that region is in development compared to European countries with advanced water systems.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Julie Adshead

The purpose of this paper is to examine the European Union (EU) Water Framework Directive. It seeks first to determine whether its provisions align with modern thinking on…

394

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the European Union (EU) Water Framework Directive. It seeks first to determine whether its provisions align with modern thinking on integrated river basin management and second to assess the degree to which it has the potential to achieve legislative and inter‐agency integration throughout the Union.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a desktop study. The paper draws upon theories and definitions of integrated river basin management and internal integration in existing literature and then proceeds to examine the provisions of the Water Framework Directive in the light of the models identified.

Findings

The framework for river basin management in the Water Framework Directive does not fully match the modern approach to integrated river basin management. The directive is limited by its primary focus upon the single medium of water, and its consequent failure to fully address wider land use planning issues. It, therefore, also fails to achieve integration between all relevant legislative instruments. It provides a framework for stakeholder involvement that could potentially serve the goal of inter‐agency integration. However, due to the high level of discretion in the hands of member states, there is likely to be a substantial divergence of practice across the EU.

Originality/value

In assessing the Water Framework Directive against modern notions of river basin management and the directive's stated integrative aspirations, the paper informs implementation and practice in member states.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

Keywords

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