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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Rania A. Abdel Khaleq and Benedykt Dziegielewski

The purpose of this paper is to present a proposal for formulating a national water demand management policy for Jordan. The objective is to stimulate discussion on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a proposal for formulating a national water demand management policy for Jordan. The objective is to stimulate discussion on the development and adoption of a formal policy document.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews data on water availability and use in Jordan. This is followed by a discussion of a number of policy objectives and elements.

Findings

The paper results in the formulation of a policy that should be further reviewed and made official by the Ministry of Water and Irrigation in Jordan.

Originality/value

The paper is a new source of information on the necessary elements of water policy.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Jamal Mousa Shamieh, Ihab Hanna Sawalha, Amer Z. Salman, Emad K. Al-Karablieh, Mohammad A. Tabieh, Hussain F. Al-Qudah and Osama O. Jaara

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to estimate the water demand elasticities using a parametric linear programming (LP) model to provide an insight into the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to estimate the water demand elasticities using a parametric linear programming (LP) model to provide an insight into the accurate and flexible pricing policy of irrigation water in the Jordan Valley; and second, to highlight key risk aspects, related to water demand, which are likely to impact the community.

Design/methodology/approach

A parametric LP model was used in this research. Primary and secondary data were collected.

Findings

Results revealed that the demand elasticity is high in Spring and Summer than in Fall and Winter, meaning that during Spring and Summer farmers are willing to forgo larger amounts of water than in other months. This is because of areas planted during Spring seasons are much less than those of Autumn and Winter.

Practical implications

The Jordan Valley suffers from water scarcity risk, and consequently the area to be planted is not fully utilized, leading to lower cropping intensities. Responsible authorities in Jordan need to address these issues and propose proper solutions in order to reduce further escalation of this risk and subsequent impact on local communities. Insight into the value of water demand elasticities is essential to support and mitigate policy decision making under risk conditions, concerning investments in water supply systems; investments in the water distribution and irrigation systems; efficient allocation of water with competing sectors; setting water pricing and tariffs; setting cost recovery mechanisms, and the risks encountered under lack of mitigated policy decision making.

Originality/value

This is one of few studies that addresses in detail using a parametric LP model the issue of water scarcity, related risks and subsequent impact on society in Jordan. It is expected to help policy and decision makers better formulate future estimates and demand which subsequently reduce related risks.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2017

Xiao-jun Wang, Jian-yun Zhang, Shamsuddin Shahid, Lang Yu, Chen Xie, Bing-xuan Wang and Xu Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to develop a statistical-based model to forecast future domestic water demand in the context of climate change, population growth and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a statistical-based model to forecast future domestic water demand in the context of climate change, population growth and technological development in Yellow River.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is developed through the analysis of the effects of climate variables and population on domestic water use in eight sub-basins of the Yellow River. The model is then used to forecast water demand under different environment change scenarios.

Findings

The model projected an increase in domestic water demand in the Yellow River basin in the range of 67.85 × 108 to 62.20 × 108 m3 in year 2020 and between 73.32 × 108 and 89.27 × 108 m3 in year 2030. The general circulation model Beijing Normal University-Earth System Model (BNU-ESM) predicted the highest increase in water demand in both 2020 and 2030, while Centre National de Recherches Meteorologiques Climate Model v.5 (CNRM-CM5) and Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate- Earth System (MIROC-ESM) projected the lowest increase in demand in 2020 and 2030, respectively. The fastest growth in water demand is found in the region where water demand is already very high, which may cause serious water shortage and conflicts among water users.

Originality/value

The simple regression-based domestic water demand model proposed in the study can be used for rapid evaluation of possible changes in domestic water demand due to environmental changes to aid in adaptation and mitigation planning.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Malek Abu Rumman, Mohammad Hiyassat, Bashar Alsmadi, Ahmad Jamrah and Maha Alqam

The purpose of this paper is to assess the long‐term ability of the Integrated Southern Ghor Project (ISGP) to meet the required water demands, assess the resulting energy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the long‐term ability of the Integrated Southern Ghor Project (ISGP) to meet the required water demands, assess the resulting energy requirements, pumping costs, water transfers, benefits of the current system with respect to predevelopment conditions and effect of projected water demands increase on the resulting water deficits.

Design/methodology/approach

A surface water resources management model is developed using dynamic programming. The model inputs are the hydrological inflows from the different wadis in the project area, reservoirs characteristics and evaporation rates, system water demands. The model outputs are water deficits at the different demand areas, reservoirs storage and release sequences, water transfers and energy requirements and the associated costs. The average annual values of different performance criteria with the annual frequency curves are used to evaluate the implications of different water scenarios on the ISGP.

Findings

The results show the efficiency of the ISGP model in reducing the water deficits in the demand areas as compared to predevelopment conditions. Increased demand scenario showed the importance of finding new water projects to supplement the Southern Ghor Area in the future in order to meet the increasing water demands. The proposed water transfer will reduce the resulting deficits at the agricultural areas without the expenses of increasing the water deficits at other demand areas. The application of this model is expected to enhance decision making regarding water policies in Jordan.

Originality/value

This paper provides critical quantitative information to decision makers in Jordan about the potential of the different storage facilities and proposed transfers in meeting the required water demands in the Southern Ghor Project and assesses the required energy for that. This can help decision makers to have a holistic view about the expected water deficits in the area and therefore assist them in determining the areas impacted most and what alternative solution to use. The paper also shows the importance of using optimal control/management models to support water resources decision making in Jordan.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Joanne Tingey‐Holyoak and John D. Pisaniello

This paper aims to provide a view on the implications of large‐scale increases in demand for biomass production on water storage behaviours. In climates of high…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a view on the implications of large‐scale increases in demand for biomass production on water storage behaviours. In climates of high variability in rainfall, the pressures on farmers to build up on‐farm surface water supplies to the detriment of communities and businesses downstream is already present. Therefore, the added water storage pressures that arise from future demands for biomass need to be investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint presents a review of the issues surrounding the forecast for demand for agriculturally produced biomass and the increased demands on surface water storage created. The paper then presents the problem of unfair and unsafe water storage in agriculture through a review of the surrounding literature and policy in place in Australia.

Findings

The paper finds that if predicted skyrocketing future demand for biomass production for energy eventuates, then surface water on‐farm storages would be placed at increased risk as farmers experience pressure to store more water than they are entitled to. Increased demands from biomass production could mean that surrounding communities suffer increased threat from unfair water sharing in times of drought, and unsafe water storage in times of flood.

Practical implications

Policy should be developed rapidly to address the current unsustainable water storage management practices of farmers and sustainable biomass production. Water management behaviour certification should be introduced immediately to counter the risk of over storage in light of the demands of the future.

Originality/value

The paper provides an overview of the issues surrounding unfair and unsafe on farm water storage in dams in climate extremes placed in the context of a new and emerging demand on farmers to produce in an unsustainable manner.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2018

Hazem Smadi, Nader Al Theeb and Haneen Bawa’neh

It is essential to provide drinking water to affected population directly after a disaster. The purpose of this paper is to develop an optimization methodology that helps…

Abstract

Purpose

It is essential to provide drinking water to affected population directly after a disaster. The purpose of this paper is to develop an optimization methodology that helps in the distribution of drinking water in post-disaster situations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted on two phases: phase 1 aims at identifying an appropriate way to deliver drinking water to refugee camps from external sources, considering required drinking water quantities and four possible sources of water with respect to cost and risk assessments. Phase 2 investigates drinking water distribution within a refugee camp using covering models. The MCLP–optimal number of facilities model is proposed to ensure that the water is distributed and delivered to all individuals in a camp with minimum number of water storage tanks required. A control policy is proposed to ensure the fair distribution of water to all targeted individuals.

Findings

Al-Za’atari refugee camp, located in northeast of Jordan, was considered as the case study for this research. The result showed that the appropriate way to deliver water to the camp is by using tanker–trucks, and a minimum number of five tanks are required to distribute water to individuals inside the camp with respect to tank locations and the allocation of tank of each area.

Originality/value

The proposed methodology is essential in decision making for the distribution of drinking water in refugee camps in short-term needs. The model adds important value to the literature as the proposed problem has no solution in the literature before.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Maryam Shabani, Naser Shams Gharneh and Seyed Taghi Akhavan Niaki

Tackling the challenges of water scarcity requires comprehensive management according to financial, environmental and social issues. This paper aims to develop a planning…

Abstract

Purpose

Tackling the challenges of water scarcity requires comprehensive management according to financial, environmental and social issues. This paper aims to develop a planning approach for systematic decision-making and pay attention to uncertainties in water demand management and supply investment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents a multiobjective optimization model to manage water resources based on the balance of supply and demand. The objectives of the model include economic, social and environmental (sustainable development) factors. The model achieves an optimal urban water portfolio by using a scenario tree.

Findings

The mathematical goal programming (GP) in a multiobjective optimization model is applied and solved by the branch and bound method. The results indicate the selected supply augmentation and demand management options in each stage for 20 years according to the dry, normal and wetness year scenarios.

Practical implications

This model is based on a real-world case and has been implemented in the city of Karaj. It can be applied for water management of other cities concerning sustainable development as well.

Originality/value

This paper innovates by considering the sustainable development criteria that are defined using three objective functions, including economic, social and environmental factors. The balance of supply and demand concerning uncertainty has not been investigated in any urban water portfolios. The standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI) is incorporated to generate different scenarios. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this approach is used for the first time.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Wen Zheng, Senarath Dharmasena, Oral Capps Jr and Ramkumar Janakiraman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors affecting consumer demand for and the effects on tax on sparkling and non-sparkling bottled water in the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors affecting consumer demand for and the effects on tax on sparkling and non-sparkling bottled water in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Using nationally representative data from 62,092 households and tobit econometric procedure, conditional and unconditional factors affecting the demand for sparkling and non-sparkling bottled water were estimated.

Findings

The own-price elasticity of demand for sparkling and non-sparkling bottled water is −0.664 and −0.229, respectively. Coffee, fruit drinks, whole milk and tea are substitutes for non-sparking bottled water. Non-sparking bottled water, coffee, fruit drinks and whole milk are substitutes for sparking bottled water. Household income, race, region and presence of children significantly affect the demand for bottled water. A 10 percent increase in price due to a tax on bottled water decreased plastic use by 50 grams per household per year. This is equivalent to saving 9.5m pounds of plastic annually.

Research limitations/implications

Data used in this analysis only captured at-home consumption of bottled water by US households. While tax on bottled water may reduce the consumption of bottled water, it may increase the consumption of competitive beverages such as carbonated soft drinks or fruit drinks. Although the use of plastic with regards to water bottles may go down as a result of the tax, the plastic consumption could go up with regards to consumers’ increased purchase of other beverages. This might contribute net increase plastic bottle consumption, undermining the effects of a bottled water tax.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to look at demand and tax aspects with regards to disaggregated bottled water products.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Saumya Singh, A.B. Samaddar and R.K. Srivastava

The purpose of this study is to develop a methodology for sustainable drinking water management by assessing the existing state of the water supply system in the study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a methodology for sustainable drinking water management by assessing the existing state of the water supply system in the study area (Allahabad, India). An attempt is made to identify various problems and gaps in the existing system and evolve solutions for the present water supply problems in a GIS framework. Finally, the paper proposes a conceptual framework for sustainable drinking water management.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in four stages. The first stage involved collection of data and background information through various primary and secondary sources including reports and publications of various organizations. This was followed by discussions with various officials of Uttar Pradesh (UP) Jal Nigam (Water Corporation), Jal Sansthan (Water Board), State Ground Water Board, Central Ground Water Board and Municipal Corporation of the city. The second stage involved field studies in a few zones of the city. The third stage involved data input and analysis on a GIS platform, and the fourth stage includes the development of a solution of the present problems and proposing a conceptual framework for ensuring sustainable drinking water management for Allahabad City.

Findings

ArcInfo 9.1 has been used as a tool for storing all types of relevant data for analysis and decision making. The various thematic maps include water supply zone map, water deficit localities map, land use map, location of tubewells, overhead tanks, zonal pumping station, ward boundaries, population map, water demand and supply map.

Research limitations/implications

Applicability of a partnership between the public and the private sector has to be checked for proper institutional analysis in Allahabad City.

Originality/value

The paper assesses the problems in the existing water supply system in Allahabad and proposes to give a GIS‐based solution strategy for its sustainability. The proposed GIS‐based conceptual framework would improve the current practice of drinking water management and would reduce the present problem of water crisis. The findings of the study would be useful for cities with similar problems in underdeveloped and developing countries.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Ekaterina Yatskovskaya, Jagjit Singh Srai and Mukesh Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel resource availability assessment for supply chain (SC) configuration. This approach involves understanding both local…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel resource availability assessment for supply chain (SC) configuration. This approach involves understanding both local resource availability and the demand-side implications of supplying global/regional markets as part of a more holistic SC design activity that incorporates local environmental factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed framework was derived from literature analysis, bridging relevant literature domains – natural capital theory, industrial ecology and SC configuration – in order to develop design rules for future resource-constrained industrial systems. In order to test the proposed framework, an exploratory case study, based on secondary data, was conducted.

Findings

Research findings suggest that this approach might better identify relationships and vulnerabilities between natural resource availability and the viability of regional/global SCs. The research suggests that natural resource availability depends upon three elements – local resource consumption, global resource demand and external environmental factors.

Research limitations/implications

The framework has two main limitations. The current work is focussed on a single industry case study used to exemplify the approach. Second, the framework does not consider other possible industries, which might enter or leave the specific location during the company’s operation. Furthermore, no assessment was made of the migration of populations within the area.

Practical implications

For practitioners, such as those in the agri-food sector, the resource availability assessment framework informs SC configuration design. For policymakers, the research aims to provide policy guidelines, which can help to improve water-saving strategies for a particular region. At a broader societal level, the research raises awareness of resource scarcity amongst industrial players and the wider public.

Originality/value

A resource availability assessment framework has been proposed, suggesting that the dynamics of both global and local resource demand, in conjunction with changing local environmental factors, can over time significantly deteriorate a firm’s natural resource impact on the local environment. Thus, the framework seeks to deliver mechanisms to evaluate potential vulnerabilities and solutions available to firms using a more proactive SC design method and to apply reconfiguration processes that account for natural resources, based primarily on network and resource attributes.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

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