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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2018

Mostafa G. Mohamed, Nivin M. Ahmed and Walaa M. Abd El-Gawad

Using organic coatings serves as a key method to protect metal structures against corrosion. Attempts have been made to improve the corrosion inhibition of the coatings…

Abstract

Purpose

Using organic coatings serves as a key method to protect metal structures against corrosion. Attempts have been made to improve the corrosion inhibition of the coatings using novel types of pigments. This study aims to study the application of organic coatings containing rice straw (RS) waste as anticorrosive pigment for corrosion protection of reinforced steel. The RS was used by precipitating a thin layer of ferrite pigments on its surface to improve their characteristics and corrosion resistance activity.

Design/methodology/approach

The evaluation of corrosion behavior of coated reinforced steel with paints containing these novel pigments is reported using different electrochemical methods.

Findings

The coatings containing the new prepared RS-ferrite pigments offered good corrosion protection, and coatings containing RS-ZnFe showed the best protection performance.

Originality/value

This paper introduces novel method to prepare treated RS without any burning and to play the role of pigments in anticorrosive paint formulations based on its silica content.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 65 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Sushil

A systems perspective of waste management allows an integratedapproach not only to the five basic functional elements of wastemanagement itself (generation, reduction…

Abstract

A systems perspective of waste management allows an integrated approach not only to the five basic functional elements of waste management itself (generation, reduction, collection, recycling, disposal), but to the problems arising at the interfaces with the management of energy, nature conservation, environmental protection, economic factors like unemployment and productivity, etc. This monograph separately describes present practices and the problems to be solved in each of the functional areas of waste management and at the important interfaces. Strategies for more efficient control are then proposed from a systems perspective. Systematic and objective means of solving problems become possible leading to optimal management and a positive contribution to economic development, not least through resource conservation. India is the particular context within which waste generation and management are discussed. In considering waste disposal techniques, special attention is given to sewage and radioactive wastes.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 90 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

R. Kerry Turner and Jane Powell

Future waste management in the UK will have to address the problemof rising costs of waste disposal. The current financial costs oflandfill disposal represent an under…

Abstract

Future waste management in the UK will have to address the problem of rising costs of waste disposal. The current financial costs of landfill disposal represent an under pricing of the waste assimilative capacity of the environment. Economic, social and political pressures over the coming decade will serve to force up disposal costs closer to the “true” economic cost to society. The cost rise will have important positive ramifications for waste minimisation and waste recycling. It is argued that rational decision making in the waste management context has been made more difficult in the UK because of a series of failures: information failure; lack of “systems” thinking; institutional failure; lack of economic cost‐benefit thinking.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Emy Ezura A Jalil, David B. Grant, John D Nicholson and Pauline Deutz

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the proposition that there is a symbiosis effect for exchanges between household waste recycling systems (HWRSs) and household…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the proposition that there is a symbiosis effect for exchanges between household waste recycling systems (HWRSs) and household recycling behaviour (HRB) within the reverse logistics (RL) discourse.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper contains empirical findings from a two phase, multi-method approach comprising consecutive inductive and deductive investigations. The qualitative and quantitative data underpin exploratory and explanatory findings which broaden and deepen the understanding of this phenomenon.

Findings

Analysis identified significant interactions between situational and personal factors, specifically demographic factors, affecting HRB with key factors identified as engagement, convenience, availability and accessibility.

Research limitations/implications

Findings confirm the existence of a symbiosis effect between situational and personal factors and inform current research trends in the environmental sciences, behavioural and logistics literature, particularly identifying consumers as being an important pivot point between forward and RL flows.

Practical implications

Findings should inform RL-HWRSs design by municipalities looking to more effectively manage MSW and enhance recycling and sustainability. RL practitioners should introduce systems to support recovery of MSW in sympathy with communication and education initiatives to affect HRB and should also appreciate a symbiosis effect in the design of HWRSs.

Social implications

The social implications of improved recycling performances in municipalities are profound. Even incremental improvements in the performance of HWRSs can lead to enhanced sustainability through higher recycling rates, reduced diversion of MSW to landfill, decreases in pollution levels, reduced carbon footprints and reduction in depletion of scarce natural resources.

Originality/value

The paper marks an early contribution to the study of symbiosis in HWRSs and HRB pertaining to RL. Findings are offered that identify the key situational and personal factors that interact to affect enhanced HWRSs and also offer insights above those available in current multi-disciplinary literature that has largely examined such factors in isolation. Conclusions offer the possibility of an epistemological bridge between the social and natural sciences.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Kellogg Fairbank

The waste management industry is changing dramatically as a resultof new legislation and commercial pressures. Examines the currentsituation and looks at the future of the…

Abstract

The waste management industry is changing dramatically as a result of new legislation and commercial pressures. Examines the current situation and looks at the future of the industry throughout Europe.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 93 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Book part
Publication date: 13 October 2017

Katerina Toshevska-Trpchevska, Irena Kikerkova and Elena Makrevska Disoska

Over the last 15 years, all the legislation on waste management in the Republic of Macedonia has been brought in compliance with the European legislation. The major

Abstract

Over the last 15 years, all the legislation on waste management in the Republic of Macedonia has been brought in compliance with the European legislation. The major challenge in the economy, however, still happens to be the (non) implementation of the enforced laws on green economy. Major constrains in waste management practices remain to be organization of institutions and human resources; financing of services and investments; stakeholder (non) awareness; and lack of technical management in all phases from collection to final disposal of waste. It is not only that the present situation has negative impact on the public health and the environment, but it also has serious negative economic effects which consequently affects issues related to the total economic growth of the country.

The paper has a special focus on managing packaging and packaging waste and analyzes the results of the implementation of the Law of Management of Packaging and Packaging Waste which was enforced in 2009. Positive initiatives in waste management practices were undertaken by PAKOMAK, the first Macedonian company that has been holding the license for selecting and processing of packaging waste since January 2011. The company has a proactive role in promoting the importance of packaging waste and its management, with a special emphasis on projects that increase the awareness of the whole society, especially that of the young population. Some of the projects that increase the eco-awareness of young population will be presented in the paper.

Details

Green Economy in the Western Balkans
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-499-6

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Jecton Anyango Tocho and Timothy Mwololo Waema

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of e-waste management practices in Kenya and selected countries. It develops an ideal regulatory framework for e-waste

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of e-waste management practices in Kenya and selected countries. It develops an ideal regulatory framework for e-waste management in Kenya.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted for this paper includes collecting data using interviews, direct observation and literature review. Both qualitative and quantitative methods are used.

Findings

Waste is an emerging stream of solid waste in Kenya. It has become a major concern due to the high volumes generated, its hazardous fractions and the lack of policies applicable to its disposal. Gaps are identified in the areas of awareness levels, e-waste management technology, financing, collection, disposal, monitoring, and stakeholder collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

The study area is limited to Nairobi and its environs. With regard to product, the paper focuses on ICT equipment.

Practical implications

The proposed framework has direct practical policy implications to manufacturers who ought to reduce e-waste from production, consumers who should adopt safe disposal practices, recyclers/informal actors who ought to use environmentally friendly methods and government agencies that enforce e-waste policies.

Social implications

Adoption of the proposed framework has positive socio-economic impacts on job creation, reduced crime and sound environmental management.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the body of knowledge on the e-waste problem from the perspective of developed as well as developing countries. It points out best practices for socio-economic development and fronts arguments for sustainable environmental management.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

JoAnn DeVries

In 1987, Campbell Soup Company introduced the Souper Combo, a line of frozen soup and sandwiches. Melvin Druin, vice‐president for packaging, called it “the perfect…

Abstract

In 1987, Campbell Soup Company introduced the Souper Combo, a line of frozen soup and sandwiches. Melvin Druin, vice‐president for packaging, called it “the perfect combination of old‐fashioned good taste and today's convenience. No mess. No fuss. Easy to use. All you have to do is clean your spoon. Everything else just throw away.” Unfortunately, the multi‐layered plastic‐coated packaging does not just disappear when thrown away. Plastics packaging, particularly from convenience products, has become a waste disposal nightmare. Garbage, an environmental magazine, gave the Souper Combo an “in the dumpster” award, saying, “It's precisely the kind of product that's created the municipal landfill monster.”

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2006

Christopher Rootes

The siting of new waste incinerators has often stimulated vigorous opposition. U.S. research concludes that successful campaigns depend upon the discourse and tactics…

Abstract

The siting of new waste incinerators has often stimulated vigorous opposition. U.S. research concludes that successful campaigns depend upon the discourse and tactics employed by campaigners and the skills and ingenuity of campaigners rather than the static characteristics of local communities. Evidence from recent anti-incinerator campaigns in England suggests otherwise. In England, community characteristics differentiate, but campaigners’ discourse matters less than political opportunities determined by the structure of local political systems, the urgency of local waste authorities’ concerns to find solutions to problems of waste disposal, the sequence of relevant planning decisions, and changes in the national policy context.

Details

Community and Ecology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-410-2

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Leslie E. Sekerka and Derek Stimel

This article aims to draw insight from a variety of management disciplines to encourage a broader view of the economy as it relates to sustainable waste management (SWM…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to draw insight from a variety of management disciplines to encourage a broader view of the economy as it relates to sustainable waste management (SWM) development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a framework to describe how strengths can be blended to support environmental sustainability (ES), highlighting the need for community cooperation between the informal and formal sectors of the economy.

Findings

Unique contributions for SWM can emerge from both economic sectors and, when leveraged, may drive community development within local municipalities.

Practical implications

The platform addresses the need for more flexible governmental policies that encourage waste management activities among formal and informal workers.

Originality/value

The paper brings forward typically disregarded ES waste management opportunities that reside within the informal sector, an often overlooked aspect of the broader economy.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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