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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 July 2022

Wassim Ben Ayed

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of government policies adopted by the Tunisian government to cope with the COVID-19 sanitary crisis on stock market return.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of government policies adopted by the Tunisian government to cope with the COVID-19 sanitary crisis on stock market return.

Design/methodology/approach

The author uses daily data from March 2, 2020, to July 23, 2021.

Findings

The author finds that policies interventions have a negative impact on Tunisia's stock market, particularly stock market returns due to stringency, confinement and health measures. Also, Government announcements regarding economic has a negative impact on Tunisia's stock market but this impact is insignificant. By conducting an additional analysis, the author shows that the government interventions policies amplify the negative effect of COVID-19 on stock returns.

Research limitations/implications

These results will be useful for policy authorities seeking to consider the advantages and drawbacks of government measures. Finally, a legislative proposal about the audit of public debt should be included in the Constitution to spur Tunisia's economic and social recovery.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the related literature in two ways: First, it is the first study to examine the impact of government actions on stock market performance. Second, it bridges a gap in the literature by investigating the case of Tunisia, because most studies focus on developed and emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Business and Socio-economic Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2635-1374

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Wassim Ben Ayed, Ibrahim Fatnassi and Abderrazak Ben Maatoug

The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of Value-at-Risk (VaR) models for nine Middle East and North Africa Islamic indices using RiskMetrics and VaR…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of Value-at-Risk (VaR) models for nine Middle East and North Africa Islamic indices using RiskMetrics and VaR parametric models.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test the performance of several VaR models using Kupiec and Engle and Manganelli tests at 95 and 99 per cent levels for long and short trading positions, respectively, for the period from August 10, 2006 to December 14, 2014.

Findings

The authors’ findings show that the VaR under Student and skewed Student distribution are preferred at a 99 per cent level VaR. However, at 95 per cent level, the VaR forecasts obtained under normal distribution are more accurate than those generated using models with fat-tailed distributions. These results suggest that VaR is a good tool for measuring market risk. The authors support the use of RiskMetrics during calm periods and the asymmetric models (Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedastic and the Asymmetric Power ARCH model) during stressed periods.

Practical implications

These results will be useful to investors and risk managers operating in Islamic markets, because their success depends on the ability to forecast stock price movements. Therefore, because a few Islamic financial institutions use internal models for their capital calculations, the regulatory committee should enhance market risk disclosure.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the knowledge in this area by improving our understanding of market risk management for Islamic assets during the stress periods. Then, it highlights important implications regarding financial risk management. Finally, this study fills a gap in the literature, as most empirical studies dealing with evaluating VaR prediction models have focused on quantifying the model risk in the conventional market.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 11 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 February 2021

Wassim Ben Ayed, Rim Ammar Lamouchi and Suha M. Alawi

The purpose of this study is to investigate factors influencing the net stable funding ratio (NSFR) in the Islamic banking system. More specifically, the authors analyze…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate factors influencing the net stable funding ratio (NSFR) in the Islamic banking system. More specifically, the authors analyze the impact of the deposit structure on the liquidity ratio using the two-step generalized method of moments approach during the 2000–2014 period.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on IFSB-12 and the GN-6, the authors calculated the NSFR for 35 Islamic banks operating in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.

Findings

The findings of this study show the following: first, ratio of profit-sharing investment accounts have a positive impact on the NSFR, while ratio of non profit-sharing investment accounts increase the maturity transformation risk; second, the results highlight that asset risk, bank capital and the business cycle have a positive impact on the liquidity ratio, while the returns on assets, bank size and market concentration have a negative impact; and third, these results support the IFSB’s efforts in developing guidelines for modifying the NSFR to enhance the liquidity risk management of institutions offering Islamic financial services.

Research limitations/implications

The most prominent limitation of this research is the availability of data.

Practical implications

These results will be useful for authorities and policy makers seeking to clarify the implications of adopting the liquidity requirement for banking behavior.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the knowledge in this area by improving our understanding of liquidity risk management during liquidity stress periods. It analyzes the modified NSFR that was adopted by the IFSB. Besides, this study fills a gap in the literature. Previous studies have used the conventional ratios to determinate the main factors of the maturity transformation risk in a full-fledged Islamic bank based on an early version of NSFR. Finally, most studies focus on the NSFR as proposed by the Basel Committee, whereas the authors investigate the case of the dual-banking system in the emerging economies of seven Arab countries in the MENA region.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

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