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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Eva Kašperová and John Kitching

The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel conception of embodied entrepreneurial identity. Prior studies conceptualise identity primarily in terms of narrative or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel conception of embodied entrepreneurial identity. Prior studies conceptualise identity primarily in terms of narrative or discourse. Critiquing the limited focus on linguistic practices, the authors build on the literature by highlighting the role of the non-linguistic. The implications for researching one particular group – entrepreneurs with impairments – are considered.

Design/methodology/approach

Entrepreneurial identity is conceptualised as a unique constellation of concerns emergent from the embodied practices of agents committed to new venture creation and management. This new conception draws principally on the embodiment literature, Archer's identity framework and Goffman's ideas on the presentation of self, impression management and stigma.

Findings

The entrepreneurial identity literature is underpinned by a number of problematic assumptions that limit understanding of the meaning, formation and influence of identity on action. The body is often an absent presence; it is presupposed, implicit or under-theorised as an influence on identity, producing a disembodied notion of the entrepreneur. Consequently, entrepreneurs are treated as an homogeneous group in terms of the embodied properties and powers, rather than as uniquely embodied individuals. Studies typically assume an able-bodied, as opposed to a differently abled, agent. Entrepreneurs with impairments are largely invisible in the literature as a result.

Originality/value

The approach highlights the role of the body and embodied non-linguistic practices, such as movement, posture, gestures and facial expressions in the formation of identity. Recognising entrepreneurs as differently abled agents, possessing particular embodied properties and powers, is crucial for understanding identity and action.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Danielle Cooper and Warren Watson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of two moderators of the relationships between affective conflict and cognitive conflict and team performance: the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of two moderators of the relationships between affective conflict and cognitive conflict and team performance: the cultural context and the level of team‐oriented behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey questionnaires were administered to a sample of 143 Mexico‐ and US‐based learning teams. Regression analysis was used to test hypotheses.

Findings

In both cultural contexts, cognitive conflict more positively affected performance when team‐oriented behaviors were high. This effect was stronger for Mexican teams. Affective conflict more negatively affected performance in Mexican teams than US teams, particularly when team‐oriented behaviors were high.

Practical implications

The results have implications for managing conflict to improve team effectiveness in the USA and in Mexico and for training managers who work across these cultural contexts.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the joint role of the cultural context and team behaviors in how conflict influences team performance.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2020

Abstract

Details

Leadership Strategies for Promoting Social Responsibility in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-427-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Robert L. Lattimer

Those entrusted with leading corporations and organizations into the 215t century face profound changes. They must address severe competitive pressures, globalization of…

Abstract

Those entrusted with leading corporations and organizations into the 215t century face profound changes. They must address severe competitive pressures, globalization of markets, and deregulation, as well as an increasingly sophisticated, diverse customer base. All this is taking place as the workforce is becoming more diverse and its values and expectations are changing in fundamental and challenging ways. As a result, it has become clear that leaders of organizations must quickly develop business strategies and manage performance in significantly more creative and flexible ways.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Spero C. Peppas

States that as managing a culturally diverse workforce has become increasingly important to business and government, organizations across the USA have focused considerable…

Abstract

States that as managing a culturally diverse workforce has become increasingly important to business and government, organizations across the USA have focused considerable attention on diversity and diversity training. Highlights that, despite this emphasis, there is little data in terms of the attitudes of specific subcultures as related to management values. Compares the attitudes of individuals from Afro‐American and euro‐American cultures with respect to 18 value statements related to management. Suggests that there were no significant differences.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Torbjörn Åkerstedt, Peter M. Nilsson and Göran Kecklund

This chapter summarizes the knowledge on sleep and restitution. Sleep constitutes the recuperative process of the central nervous system. The use of the brain during…

Abstract

This chapter summarizes the knowledge on sleep and restitution. Sleep constitutes the recuperative process of the central nervous system. The use of the brain during wakefulness will lead to depletion of energy in the cortical areas locally responsible for activity. The level of depletion is monitored and sleep is initiated when critical levels are reached. The attempts to initiate sleep are perceived as sleepiness or fatigue. The ensuing sleep then actively restores brain physiology to normal levels. This also results in restored alertness, memory capacity, and mood. Also, peripheral anabolic processes (secretion of growth hormone and testosterone) are strongly enhanced and catabolic process (secretion of cortisol and catecholamines) are strongly suppressed. In the long run, reduced or impaired sleep leads to metabolic diseases, depression, burnout, and mortality. Stress and irregular hours are among the main causes of disturbed sleep.

Details

Current Perspectives on Job-Stress Recovery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-544-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Robert L. Lattimer

The premise is that organizations that are successful in the future, will develop and implement strategies that are based on the economic realities of the roots of the…

Abstract

The premise is that organizations that are successful in the future, will develop and implement strategies that are based on the economic realities of the roots of the entity, but understands the economic realities of which they currently compete; an additional premise is that organizational strategies must be designed within the context of the “real delivery time” environment.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Nienke Agnes Spaan, Matthijs Verzaal and Hendrien Lourine Kaal

In the Netherlands, the Screener for Intelligence and Learning Disabilities (SCIL) was developed to aid recognition of mild to borderline intellectual disability (MBID…

Abstract

Purpose

In the Netherlands, the Screener for Intelligence and Learning Disabilities (SCIL) was developed to aid recognition of mild to borderline intellectual disability (MBID) early in the criminal justice system or health-care trajectory. In situations where physically meeting the suspect or client is not feasible, administration of the SCIL using a video-link might be a solution. This paper aims to examine whether the SCIL is still reliable when administered remotely instead of face-to-face.

Design/methodology/approach

The SCIL was administered twice to a total of 89 respondents: once face-to-face, once using a video link, in varying order and with an interval of at least six weeks. A laptop with a Skype connection was used for the remote administration, while an assistant was present to make sure the respondents did not have to perform technical actions. After the second SCIL administration, respondents were asked to answer a series of evaluation questions.

Findings

Respondents were generally satisfied with both methods of administration of the SCIL. However, they were in general more positive about face-to-face administration. Nevertheless, most respondents would be willing to undergo administration through video-link in future. On average, respondents scored slightly lower on the SCIL when administered remotely (µ = 16.31, SE = 0 0.77) than with face-to-face administration (µ = 16.94, SE = 0.78), t(88) = 2.47, p = 0 0.015. Calculation of the reliability of the assessment “suspected MBID” showed a (linear weighted) Kappa of 0.77, p = 0.000, 95% RI: 0.64-0.90.

Originality/value

The results of this study show that with some caution, the SCIL can be administered remotely. When doing this, the SCIL will only lead to a small number of respondents being wrongly labelled as “suspected MBID”.

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Lorraine Warren, Alistair Anderson and Jo Bensemann

In this chapter, the authors explore entrepreneurial change in Stanton, a rural small town in New Zealand. This once-prosperous place has suffered economically and…

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors explore entrepreneurial change in Stanton, a rural small town in New Zealand. This once-prosperous place has suffered economically and socially as its past core industries have vanished, and it can now be considered as a depleted community. Yet in recent years, the town has seen a rejuvenation, in part due to the endeavours of Sue, a high-profile entrepreneur from outside the town who has set up several businesses in the town and indeed in other small towns in the region. Theoretically, the authors take an entrepreneurial identity perspective in examining how Sue’s arrival has changed the town; the authors examine how her entrepreneurship was perceived as legitimate. The authors use a qualitative methodology based on semi-structured interviews. The authors contribute in demonstrating how an ascribed entrepreneurial identity can not only enable but also hinder change in this community, generating confidence and emotional contagion around entrepreneurship, and also uncertainty and resentment. In doing so, the authors challenge the universality of entrepreneurship benefits.

Details

Creating Entrepreneurial Space: Talking Through Multi-Voices, Reflections on Emerging Debates
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-372-8

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Legal Professions: Work, Structure and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-800-2

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