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Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Frank E. Kuzmits

The differences in incidences of absenteeism and discipline between Vietnamese and non‐Vietnamese employees in a food processing plant were examined Subjects were 80…

Abstract

The differences in incidences of absenteeism and discipline between Vietnamese and non‐Vietnamese employees in a food processing plant were examined Subjects were 80 non‐Vietnamese and 35 Vietnamese refugees living in a medium‐sized midwestern city. Three forms of motivational absenteeism (single‐day absences, part‐day absences, and no‐calls) and one form of ability to attend absenteeism (multiple‐day absences) were examined Two forms of discipline, warnings and suspensions, were also examined Based on a presumed impact of Confucianism upon Vietnamese work values, it was predicted that Vietnamese employees, compared to non‐Vietnamese employees, would experience less motivational absenteeism, less absence‐related discipline, and no difference in ability to attend absenteeism. All hypothesis were supported Potential impact of the research on cultural stereotypes and on the employment recruiting and selection process are discussed.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Etienne Redor

In a world of asymmetric information between managers and investors, the choice of the payment method is a key issue in mergers and acquisitions. Previous literature shows…

Abstract

In a world of asymmetric information between managers and investors, the choice of the payment method is a key issue in mergers and acquisitions. Previous literature shows that contingent methods of payment other than stocks (e.g. contingent value rights, earnouts or convertible securities), even if they do not solve the information asymmetry problems, can mitigate their consequences. In this chapter, I examine the motivations and the effects of the inclusion of a contingent payment method the use of which has not been studied yet, the warrant. I show that this consideration is used mainly when information asymmetry problems are severe and that it can be used to solve the information problems.

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Wendy Koslicki

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test common explanations for the growth of police militarization and to determine whether federal funding, such as Byrne…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test common explanations for the growth of police militarization and to determine whether federal funding, such as Byrne grants, had a significant effect on the growth and normalization of SWAT teams.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from data spanning the years 1986-1998, an interrupted time series analysis is used to assess whether federal funding has a significant influence on the growth of SWAT teams and their mobilization for narcotics grants.

Findings

The findings of this analysis suggest that, at the time where federal funding was at its peak (the year 1990), there was a significant decrease in SWAT team creation compared to the years prior. There was likewise a significant decrease in SWAT mobilization for narcotics warrant in the years following 1990.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study is that unmeasured exogenous factors in the year 1990 may have influenced militarization trends. However, given the counterintuitive findings of this study, it is essential that more nuanced research is conducted regarding police militarization to gain a clearer understanding of trends in police culture. As this study finds that militarization is not significantly driven by federal funding, future research must incorporate other factors to explain police organizational change.

Originality/value

This paper provides an advanced empirical analysis that is one of the first to directly test commonly held explanations for police militarization. This analysis adds complexity to the issue of US police militarization and demonstrates that further research is essential in this area.

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Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Paul Brockman and Brett C. Olsen

Firms issuing equity securities for capital must recognize that this issuance may alter the ownership concentration of the firm. Through this change in ownership…

Abstract

Purpose

Firms issuing equity securities for capital must recognize that this issuance may alter the ownership concentration of the firm. Through this change in ownership structure, the market liquidity of the firm's stock may also change, which has implications for the cost of equity capital and firm value. This paper aims to examine a specific security, the common stock purchase warrant, within this context. It also aims to posit that the decision to issue warrants has important implications for the firm's subsequent ownership structure and market liquidity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper's unique dataset of warrant‐issuing firms tracks the warrants from their issue through to their exercise. Based on the study of SEOs by Kothare, the ownership concentration and market liquidity of the underlying stock prior to and following warrant exercises are measured. The paper examines the causal relations between warrant exercises and ownership changes, and between ownership changes and market liquidity.

Findings

The paper shows that firms experience a statistically and economically significant decrease in ownership concentration following warrant exercises. Examining the liquidity effects of this change in ownership, it shows that market liquidity increases significantly after the exercise of warrants, consistent with the literature. The decrease in concentration following warrant exercises is experienced exclusively by firm insiders. The paper also finds that outsiders increase their holdings in firms with a high concentration of inside holdings and in firms with a low concentration of outside holdings prior to warrant exercises; that is, they use warrant offerings to increase their influence in the firm.

Originality/value

This study is the first to the authors' knowledge that investigates warrants through their entire life span, and the first to examine the effects of warrant exercises on the performance and market liquidity of the firm. The results contribute to securities issuance, ownership, and liquidity literatures.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2018

Christopher A. Ballweg, William H. Ross, Davide Secchi and Chad Uting

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence and influence of social network website (SNW) content about alcohol use and abuse on job applicant reactions to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence and influence of social network website (SNW) content about alcohol use and abuse on job applicant reactions to their prospective immediate supervisor and toward applying for the job.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, raters coded photographs and photo captions found on 1,048 personal SNWs of US managers or business owners. Approximately 22 percent of managers’ personal SNWs contained references to alcohol, providing a base rate large enough to warrant further research. In Study 2, laboratory experiment participants saw a fictitious company’s website including a professional managerial profile. A 3 × 3 factorial design then varied whether the prospective manager’s comments on his personal SNW emphasized professional activities, social drinking, or alcohol abuse; also, the manager’s friends’ comments emphasized work activities, social drinking, or alcohol abuse. A control group did not see a personal SNW.

Findings

Alcohol abuse information on personal SNWs – whether posted by the manager or by the manager’s friends – negatively affected attitudes toward the manager. Alcohol abuse information posted by the manager (but not by the manager’s friends) decreased the willingness of participants to apply for the position. These findings were consistent with the Brunswick Lens Model and the warranting hypothesis.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate managerial SNW content and it effects upon prospective job seekers’ attitudes.

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Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2015

Enrique Martínez-García

The global slack hypothesis is central to the discussion of the trade-offs that monetary policy faces in an increasingly more integrated world. The workhorse New Open…

Abstract

The global slack hypothesis is central to the discussion of the trade-offs that monetary policy faces in an increasingly more integrated world. The workhorse New Open Economy Macro (NOEM) model of Martínez-García and Wynne (2010), which fleshes out this hypothesis, shows how expected future local inflation and global slack affect current local inflation. In this chapter, I propose the use of the orthogonalization method of Aoki (1981) and Fukuda (1993) on the workhorse NOEM model to further decompose local inflation into a global component and an inflation differential component. I find that the log-linearized rational expectations model of Martínez-García and Wynne (2010) can be solved with two separate subsystems to describe each of these two components of inflation.

I estimate the full NOEM model with Bayesian techniques using data for the United States and an aggregate of its 38 largest trading partners from 1980Q1 until 2011Q4. The Bayesian estimation recognizes the parameter uncertainty surrounding the model and calls on the data (inflation and output) to discipline the parameterization. My findings show that the strength of the international spillovers through trade – even in the absence of common shocks – is reflected in the response of global inflation and is incorporated into local inflation dynamics. Furthermore, I find that key features of the economy can have different impacts on global and local inflation – in particular, I show that the parameters that determine the import share and the price-elasticity of trade matter in explaining the inflation differential component but not the global component of inflation.

Details

Monetary Policy in the Context of the Financial Crisis: New Challenges and Lessons
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-779-6

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Marko Orel and Will Bennis

The purpose of this paper is to define coworking in juxtaposition to open, collaborative workspaces that have already long existed at companies and universities and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define coworking in juxtaposition to open, collaborative workspaces that have already long existed at companies and universities and to establish that this model of coworking has taken off in the business world, but has not taken off at education institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature and existing resources on flexible work arrangement in academic settings are reviewed to explore the possible applications of a coworking model to higher education. Because of minimal empirical research on the topic, the paper opens up a much-needed discussion on coworking in a scholarly context and its potential benefits for institutions of higher education.

Findings

Establishing scholarly coworking units on a broader scale could enhance the development of a cross-regional dimension in education by encouraging mobility of both students and scholars and promote cooperation among educational institutions. The implementation of coworking spaces for universities has occurred at a much lower rate than business-oriented coworking spaces, and several potential reasons for this asymmetry are considered.

Originality/value

While establishing an on- or off-campus coworking environment for graduate and postgraduate pupils is explored to some extent, the possibility and beneficial role of a scholarly coworking space model are poorly understood and under-studied. This conceptual paper provides a framework for applying the coworking model to scholarly settings, with the potential to facilitate more open and inclusive scientific collaboration, research and education, addressing one of the central problems of geographic and institutional barriers to scholarship.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Book part
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Kimberly L. Kulovitz and Edward A. Mabry

This study presents findings leading to the conclusion that cyberbullying in massively multiplayer online (MMO) games can be conceptualized, measured and at least…

Abstract

This study presents findings leading to the conclusion that cyberbullying in massively multiplayer online (MMO) games can be conceptualized, measured and at least partially explained as a normative phenomenon, similar to Latane & Darley's (1970) bystander inaction hypothesis. An overall sample of N=372 respondents to an online survey provided information on their daily amount of Internet use and daily amount of time engaged in playing in MMO games. Scales for the assessment of both cyberbullying victimization and bullying itself were developed. Victims of cyberbullying appear more sensitive to bullying incidents albeit no more likely than game players who have engaged in bullying to intervene in preventing it. Perpetrators of cyberbullying, however, also appear to be heavily invested in both Internet use and MMO game play and that could amplify an individual's aggressiveness as a player in turn making it more likely they will engage in cyberbullying. The study concludes with a qualitative examination of MMO game player narrative self-explanations for nonintervention in cyberbullying that parallels Latane and Darley's explanation of bystander nonintervention in face-to-face threatening or emergency contexts.

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Misbehavior Online in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-456-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

Donald J. Shemwell, J. Joseph Cronin and William R. Bullard

Using primary care physicians, automobile mechanics and hairstylists asthe analysed industries, highlights the importance of relationships inthe marketing of services. Two…

Abstract

Using primary care physicians, automobile mechanics and hairstylists as the analysed industries, highlights the importance of relationships in the marketing of services. Two key relationship variables, trust and affective commitment, are the focal points for the empirical study. The data suggest that the higher the level of trust and affective commitment in a customer service‐provider relationship, the greater the probability that the consumer will continue the relationship, and the lower the level of perceived risk inherent in the relationship. Also, the findings suggest that females seek more trust and commitment than do males within the service‐provider/customer relationship, and consumers in general place more trust in and are more committed to their doctor and their hairstylist than to their mechanic.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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