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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Xiaohua Zhao, Xuewei Li, Yufei Chen, Haijian Li and Yang Ding

Heavy fog results in low visibility, which increases the probability and severity of traffic crashes, and fog warning system is conducive to the reduction of crashes by…

Abstract

Purpose

Heavy fog results in low visibility, which increases the probability and severity of traffic crashes, and fog warning system is conducive to the reduction of crashes by conveying warning messages to drivers. This paper aims at exploring the effects of dynamic message sign (DMS) of fog warning system on driver performance.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a testing platform was established based on driving simulator and driver performance data under DMS were collected. The experiment route was consisted of three different zones (i.e. warning zone, transition zone and heavy fog zone), and mean speed, mean acceleration, mean jerk in the whole zone, ending speed in the warning zone and transition zone, maximum deceleration rate and mean speed reduction proportion in the transition zone and heavy fog zone were selected. Next, the one-way analysis of variance was applied to test the significant difference between the metrics. Besides, drivers’ subjective perception was also considered.

Findings

The results indicated that DMS is beneficial to reduce speed before drivers enter the heavy fog zone. Besides, when drivers enter a heavy fog zone, DMS can reduce the tension of drivers and make drivers operate more smoothly.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive approach for evaluating the effectiveness of the warning system in adverse conditions based on the driving simulation test platform. The method can be extended to the evaluation of vehicle-to-infrastructure technology in other special scenarios.

Details

Journal of Intelligent and Connected Vehicles, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-9802

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Harkunti Pertiwi Rahayu, Louise K. Comfort, Richard Haigh, Dilanthi Amaratunga and Devina Khoirunnisa

This study aims to identify the gaps in current policy and propose a viable framework for policy improvement regarding people-centered tsunami early warning chain in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the gaps in current policy and propose a viable framework for policy improvement regarding people-centered tsunami early warning chain in Padang City. The objectives are: to describe the gaps and flaws in the current policy regarding local tsunami early warning chain, to identify potential actors to be involved in the tsunami early warning chain and to assess the roles and capacity of actors, and their potential for involvement in early warning.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is an exploratory study using social network analysis (SNA) on regulations and other legal documents, and primary data sources from a focus group discussion and semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The study found that the existed regulation lacks extension nodes to relay warnings to the populations at risk, often referred to as “the last mile.” Moreover, receiving warning information from both formal and informal sources is important to mobilize people evacuation more effectively during an emergency. The study found that mosque communities and disaster preparedness leaders are the potential actors who should be involved in the local early warning chain.

Practical implications

The research findings were presented as a recommendation to Padang City Government and have been legalized as the new tsunami early warning chain procedure in the Padang City Mayor Regulation 19/2018.

Originality/value

This research investigated local tsunami early warning dissemination in Padang City using SNA. The study demonstrates a close collaboration between researchers, practitioners and the community.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Mo Hamza and Peter Månsson

The 2004 Boxing Day tsunami prompted global efforts to develop end-to-end multi-hazard warning systems. Taking this event as a starting point, and drawing on experiences…

Abstract

Purpose

The 2004 Boxing Day tsunami prompted global efforts to develop end-to-end multi-hazard warning systems. Taking this event as a starting point, and drawing on experiences from the following advancement of the Indonesian tsunami early warning system, this paper aims to highlight the importance of paying attention to human factors and the perceptions and behaviors of end recipients when trying to design efficient early warning systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a viewpoint where theoretical frameworks for the design of efficient early warning systems are used as backdrop to an extensive review and analysis of secondary data, including scientific papers and newspaper articles.

Findings

The paper presents what an end-to-end warning system means, explores process problems related to perception and communication and concludes with views and recommendations toward more inclusive early warnings.

Originality/value

Research and practice related to early warning systems have traditionally had a strong focus on technological elements whilst the target groups of early warnings (i.e. communities) have received far less attention and resources. This paper focuses on the human dimension of warning systems and uses a real case to exemplify how efficient warning systems not only require a sound scientific and technological basis, but also depend on the awareness, trust and will of the people they aim to protect.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Richard Haigh, Maheshika Menike Sakalasuriya, Dilanthi Amaratunga, Senaka Basnayake, Siri Hettige, Sarath Premalal and Ananda Jayasinghe Arachchi

The purpose of this paper is to deliver a detailed analysis of the functioning of upstream–downstream interface process of the tsunami early warning and mitigation system

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deliver a detailed analysis of the functioning of upstream–downstream interface process of the tsunami early warning and mitigation system in Sri Lanka. It also gives an understanding of the social, administrative, political and cultural complexities attached to the operation of interface mechanism, and introduces an analytical framework highlighting the significant dynamics of the interface of tsunami early warning system in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the initial literature review, a conceptual framework was developed, highlighting the criteria against which the interface process can be assessed. This framework was used as the basis for developing data collection tools, namely, documentary analysis, semi-structured interviews and observations that focused on the key stakeholder institutions in Sri Lanka. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data according to the conceptual framework, and an improved and detailed framework was developed deriving from the findings.

Findings

The manner in which the interface mechanism operates in Sri Lanka’s tsunami early warning system is discussed, providing a detailed understanding of the decision-making structures; key actors; standardisation; technical and human capacities; socio-spatial dynamics; coordination among actors; communication and information dissemination; and the evaluation processes. Several gaps and shortcomings were identified with relation to some of these aspects, and the significance of addressing these gaps is highlighted in the paper.

Practical implications

A number of recommendations are provided to address the existing shortcomings and to improve the overall performance of tsunami warning system in Sri Lanka.

Originality/value

Based on the findings, a framework was developed into a more detailed analytical framework that depicts the interface operationalisation in Sri Lanka, and can also be potentially applied to similar cases across the world. The new analytical framework was validated through a focus group discussion held in Sri Lanka with the participation of experts and practitioners.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Sara Haji‐Kazemi and Bjørn Andersen

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the concept of early warning signs in projects and explain how a performance measurement system can be utilized as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the concept of early warning signs in projects and explain how a performance measurement system can be utilized as a source of data for an early warning approach signaling that a project is about to experience problems at some stage in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

Combination of action research and semi‐structured interviews and document analysis supplemented by a post‐mortem analysis after project close‐out.

Findings

Detection of early warning signals in projects can be better enabled through the application of a performance measurement system with properly defined key performance indicators. Utilization of this tool can positively affect the overall success of the project.

Research limitations/implications

The case study involved only one project from the oil and gas industry.

Practical implications

The empirical case study was developed to illustrate the usefulness of exploiting a performance measurement system in a project. A procedure was demonstrated for developing and implementing an early warning system based on performance measurement, and specific performance indicators have been described for other projects to copy.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the gap in the literature concerning the link between early warning and project management and the link between early warning and performance measurement. It offers a new idea on how performance measurement can be used as an effective early warning system and is intended to be primarily of use to project management practitioners and practically‐oriented academics who are interested in developing fresh insights into new approaches for better management of projects.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2008

Matthew L. Collins and Naim Kapucu

The aim of this research is to better inform public policy makers and the disaster management community about the use of early warning systems. The central research…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to better inform public policy makers and the disaster management community about the use of early warning systems. The central research question of this article is how local governments should provide early warning to the citizenry of impending tornado danger.

Design/methodology/approach

The main objectives of the paper were achieved by reviewing the literature on early warning systems for tornadoes and by conducting a content analysis of news reports, from the Orlando Sentinel newspaper, which identified the most cost‐effective early warning system for tornadoes. The theoretical approach of the paper covered the responses, results, and recommendations themes from the disaster management early warning system literature.

Findings

The study concludes with a disaster management policy recommendation for an early warning system for tornadoes for local government. The paper's recommendation is to utilize the cost‐effective NOAA weather radios to alert the citizenry of impending tornado danger. This recommendation is also generalizable to early warning systems for hurricanes, flash flooding, terrorist attacks, and other major natural and man‐made disasters.

Research limitations/implications

A research limitation is that the paper focuses on Central Florida. Future research could begin with the paper's findings and generalize these findings to other areas internationally.

Practical implications

The paper will better inform governmental policy makers and members of the disaster management community about the early warning system alternatives available to warn the citizenry of impending tornado danger. It will hopefully begin a dialogue among disaster management practitioners and academics about early warning systems for tornadoes.

Originality/value

The paper fills a gap in the tornado early warning system literature. Heretofore, there has been little writing, which this paper reviews, that compares early warning systems for tornadoes. However, the original value of the paper is that it specifically focuses on the instrument of warning the citizenry of tornadoes, the time of day of the tornado event, and the life‐saving effects of tornado warnings. The value of the paper will be to public policy makers world‐wide and to the growing disaster management community.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Rishiraj Dutta and Senaka Basnayake

This paper aims to focus on the gap assessment carried out in the existing early warning systems (EWSs) in Southeast Asia as a means to address such gaps in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the gap assessment carried out in the existing early warning systems (EWSs) in Southeast Asia as a means to address such gaps in terms of communication and information dissemination.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper was based on the surveys conducted in some of the Southeast Asian countries through interviews, group discussions and consultation to get an understanding about people’s knowledge towards EWSs and their awareness towards warning information.

Findings

The conclusions showed that there exist gaps in the existing systems which need to be strengthened to increase its efficiency for providing reliable, timely and accurate information.

Research limitations/implications

Limitation of finding more references to support the work.

Originality/value

This paper is based on the gap assessment carried out in different countries of Southeast Asia for strengthening EWSs. This paper is the original research and has never been published in any other journal.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Dennis Parker, Maureen Fordham, Sylvia Tunstall and Anne‐Michelle Ketteridge

Discusses the results of evaluations of flood forecasting, warningand response systems in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.Reveals that in England and Wales…

Abstract

Discusses the results of evaluations of flood forecasting, warning and response systems in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Reveals that in England and Wales flood warning systems often underperform. Despite technical sophistication and their elevation to high priority in central government′s flood defence strategy, arrangements for flood warnings are now under considerable stress because of lack of agreement over organizational roles and responsibilities. Legal ambiguities, funding difficulties and ideological positions lie behind these problems. Flood warning systems are developing in Scotland, and there is now a “fledgling” system in Northern Ireland, but both lag behind England and Wales. Examines implications for the future.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Ilan Kelman, Bayes Ahmed, Md Esraz-Ul-Zannat, Md Mustafa Saroar, Maureen Fordham and Mohammad Shamsudduha

The purpose of this paper is to connect the theoretical idea of warning systems as social processes with empirical data of people’s perceptions of and actions for warning

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to connect the theoretical idea of warning systems as social processes with empirical data of people’s perceptions of and actions for warning for cyclones in Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is used in two villages of Khulna district in southwest Bangladesh: Kalabogi and Kamarkhola. In total, 60 households in each village were surveyed with structured questionnaires regarding how they receive their cyclone warning information as well as their experiences of warnings for Cyclone Sidr in 2007 and Cyclone Aila in 2009.

Findings

People in the two villages had a high rate of receiving cyclone warnings and accepted them as being credible. They also experienced high impacts from the cyclones. Yet evacuation rates to cyclone shelters were low. They did not believe that significant cyclone damage would affect them and they also highlighted the difficulty of getting to cyclone shelters due to poor roads, leading them to prefer other evacuation options which were implemented if needed.

Originality/value

Theoretical constructs of warning systems, such as the First Mile and late warning, are rarely examined empirically according to people’s perceptions of warnings. The case study villages have not before been researched with respect to warning systems. The findings provide empirical evidence for long-established principles of warning systems as social processes, usually involving but not relying on technical components.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Ian Davis and Yasamin O. Izadkhah

This paper aims to provide a broad overview of the South Asian tsunami in relation to the development of the early warning system (EWS) as well as its integration within…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a broad overview of the South Asian tsunami in relation to the development of the early warning system (EWS) as well as its integration within the seismic safety chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on social and administrative aspects that require detailed attention as key elements within the overall system. The observations grow from experience gained by Ian Davis from working on the UK IDNDR Flagship project Warnings and Forecasts from 1996‐9 and from participation in the Working Group advising Prime Minister, Tony Blair, on the development of warnings in preparation for the G8 meeting held in Scotland in June 2005.

Findings

The conclusions of the paper grow from variety of experiences that both the authors have gained in working for many years in the field of disaster management. A number of requirements emerge from the experience such as specific administrative measures, political will, scientific knowledge and the development of tsunami safety culture.

Practical implications

The paper provides an overview of some of the social and administrative measures needed to enable scientific warnings to be disseminated and applied at every level to protect people and their property.

Originality/value

The message of this paper is an attempt to stress the importance of the totality of an effective warning system. At present, the scientific side has secured vital attention. But this has to be complemented with the social and administrative elements on which all scientific detection depends. The authors argue that these neglected safety elements require urgent attention if a full safety system is to function effectively.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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