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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Ilan Kelman, Bayes Ahmed, Md Esraz-Ul-Zannat, Md Mustafa Saroar, Maureen Fordham and Mohammad Shamsudduha

The purpose of this paper is to connect the theoretical idea of warning systems as social processes with empirical data of people’s perceptions of and actions for warning

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to connect the theoretical idea of warning systems as social processes with empirical data of people’s perceptions of and actions for warning for cyclones in Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is used in two villages of Khulna district in southwest Bangladesh: Kalabogi and Kamarkhola. In total, 60 households in each village were surveyed with structured questionnaires regarding how they receive their cyclone warning information as well as their experiences of warnings for Cyclone Sidr in 2007 and Cyclone Aila in 2009.

Findings

People in the two villages had a high rate of receiving cyclone warnings and accepted them as being credible. They also experienced high impacts from the cyclones. Yet evacuation rates to cyclone shelters were low. They did not believe that significant cyclone damage would affect them and they also highlighted the difficulty of getting to cyclone shelters due to poor roads, leading them to prefer other evacuation options which were implemented if needed.

Originality/value

Theoretical constructs of warning systems, such as the First Mile and late warning, are rarely examined empirically according to people’s perceptions of warnings. The case study villages have not before been researched with respect to warning systems. The findings provide empirical evidence for long-established principles of warning systems as social processes, usually involving but not relying on technical components.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Ilan Kelman

To investigate whether or not people at risk from the 26 December 2004 tsunamis could have had better warning of the event.

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate whether or not people at risk from the 26 December 2004 tsunamis could have had better warning of the event.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines short‐term actions related to warning following the earthquake and long‐term actions related to setting up an Indian Ocean tsunami warning system prior to the disaster. The evidence is presented in the context of the long‐term processes needed to create and maintain successful warning systems.

Findings

The evidence shows that, based on the knowledge and procedures existing at the time, any expectation of effective warning prior to the tsunamis was unreasonable. On 26 December 2004, as much action was taken as feasible. Prior to the catastrophe, the Indian Ocean tsunami risks were acknowledged but no warning systems were implemented because other priorities were deemed to be higher.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents a snapshot of the complex issue of warning system development and implementation. Each national and regional case study deserves detailed attention. Further work would add to a more complete understanding of conditions before 26 December 2004.

Practical implications

This case study provides a reminder that planning for warnings must be done before extreme events, not following them. Successful warning systems require investment in a long‐term, ongoing process involving pre‐event planning, education, and awareness.

Originality/value

This paper provides an initial attempt at evaluating Indian Ocean tsunami warnings on 26 December 2004.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Alexander Fink, Andreas Siebe and Jens‐Peter Kuhle

To survive and grow in an era of uncertainty, companies should strive not only for a single visionary view, which most likely corresponds with their expectations, but…

Abstract

To survive and grow in an era of uncertainty, companies should strive not only for a single visionary view, which most likely corresponds with their expectations, but instead they should try to acquire multiple views that describe the whole ”window of opportunities”. The development of external market scenarios to assess current strategies is the usual way of coping with these uncertainties. Today this traditional scenario approach has to be extended in four directions: the use of market scenarios to systematically develop future‐robust strategies, the use of alternative strategy scenarios to address uncertainties within an organization, the use of scenarios as a basis for strategic early warning processes and the combination of performance measurement and strategic early warning in a scenario‐based future scorecard. In conclusion it is shown that scenarios could significantly help to bridge the gap between strategy implementation and early‐warning processes.

Details

Foresight, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2020

Chamal Perera, Darshana Jayasooriya, Gimhan Jayasiri, Chameera Randil, Chaminda Bandara, Chandana Siriwardana, Ranjith Dissanayake, Sameera Hippola, Kamani Sylva, Thushara Kamalrathne and Asela Kulatunga

Even though Sri Lanka has established Early Warning (EW) mechanisms and Evacuation Procedures (EP) for the communities affected by the coastal disasters, there are several…

Abstract

Purpose

Even though Sri Lanka has established Early Warning (EW) mechanisms and Evacuation Procedures (EP) for the communities affected by the coastal disasters, there are several gaps, which hinder effective mechanisms in operation of disaster management practices. These gaps affect both the vulnerable communities and relevant authorities involved in the Disaster Management sector. This paper aims to identify and evaluate those gaps while providing adequate solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

For that, questionnaire surveys were carried out with a sample size of 217 via an online survey (117) among the urban level and interviews and telephone interviews (100) with the village level coastal communities. Data analysis was carried out using statistical analysis of questionnaire surveys and grounded theory was used for in-depth qualitative study.

Findings

Primary and secondary data obtained from the surveys were categorized under five themes, namely, response to early warning systems, evacuation routes, shelters, drills and training, effect of having a family vehicle, relatives and domestic animals, evacuation of people with special needs and cooperation with local government units. This paper analyses these themes in detail.

Originality/value

While critically evaluating the gaps in existing early warning mechanisms and evacuation procedures, this paper identifies correlations between some of the gaps and recommendations as well. Input from the international academics were also obtained at different forums and have strengthen the findings to overcome the barriers, which hinder successful mechanisms.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Ian Davis and Yasamin O. Izadkhah

This paper aims to provide a broad overview of the South Asian tsunami in relation to the development of the early warning system (EWS) as well as its integration within…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a broad overview of the South Asian tsunami in relation to the development of the early warning system (EWS) as well as its integration within the seismic safety chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on social and administrative aspects that require detailed attention as key elements within the overall system. The observations grow from experience gained by Ian Davis from working on the UK IDNDR Flagship project Warnings and Forecasts from 1996‐9 and from participation in the Working Group advising Prime Minister, Tony Blair, on the development of warnings in preparation for the G8 meeting held in Scotland in June 2005.

Findings

The conclusions of the paper grow from variety of experiences that both the authors have gained in working for many years in the field of disaster management. A number of requirements emerge from the experience such as specific administrative measures, political will, scientific knowledge and the development of tsunami safety culture.

Practical implications

The paper provides an overview of some of the social and administrative measures needed to enable scientific warnings to be disseminated and applied at every level to protect people and their property.

Originality/value

The message of this paper is an attempt to stress the importance of the totality of an effective warning system. At present, the scientific side has secured vital attention. But this has to be complemented with the social and administrative elements on which all scientific detection depends. The authors argue that these neglected safety elements require urgent attention if a full safety system is to function effectively.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Yunna Wu, Yong Huang and Wei Luo

The role of a government investment project (GIP) management supervisor is to improve supervision performance and the Chinese government has issued a series of polices…

Abstract

Purpose

The role of a government investment project (GIP) management supervisor is to improve supervision performance and the Chinese government has issued a series of polices, displaying the determination to solve supervision problems. The purpose of this paper is to assist the government to play its role of supervisor and to realize progress supervision performance for GIP in practice with the Agent Construction System (ACS).

Design/methodology/approach

Taking consideration of the essence of ACS, the paper analyzes the system supported theory, which is a supervision mechanism, with contract management as the core and goals as orientation. The authors design the system frame and its composing modules according to the main function of this information system.

Findings

The research builds an expected supervision information system with four functional modules, which is designed according to logical sequence of supervision, based on a theoretical supervision mechanism.

Originality/value

The system is, to the best of the authors' knowledge, the most advanced and practical information system for GIP supervision published in the literature.

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Abstract

Details

Social Media in Earthquake-Related Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-792-8

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Ishani Shehara Pitigala Liyana Arachchi, Chandana Siriwardana, Dilanthi Amaratunga and Richard Haigh

It is significant to assess the societal trust toward the new advancements in multi-hazard early warnings (MHEW) with the focus on disaster risk reduction (DRR). Based on…

Abstract

Purpose

It is significant to assess the societal trust toward the new advancements in multi-hazard early warnings (MHEW) with the focus on disaster risk reduction (DRR). Based on this, the purpose of this paper is to examine the extent of societal trust behavior along with the parameters such as mode of communication and institutions of issuing early warnings (EWs).

Design/methodology/approach

A field questionnaire survey was conducted to identify the extent of societal trust. This was conducted in ten selected Grama Niladari divisions in Sri Lanka based on a developed hazard matrix. The fuzzy logic approach was applied to examine the trust level of collected 323 responses obtained through this. The analysis was done based on the responses on mobile-based platforms in EW and the credibility level of the warnings received through different institutions.

Findings

The analyzed survey responses indicated that society has a higher extent of trust toward the EWs disseminated through mobile-based platforms. Moreover, these represent a strong positive correlation among the societal trust level and the level of importance of EW dissemination through mobile-based platforms. Further, in terms of trusted stakeholders in issuing EW alerts, Disaster Management Center, Sri Lanka Police and Media ranked the highest in the Sri Lankan context. Overall, findings were visually mapped through the causal loop diagrams (CLDs).

Practical implications

In enhancing the effectiveness of the existing MHEW mechanism, the policy implications could be done, based on the results obtained from this research study. These could be altered with the implementation of DRR strategies with a community focus.

Originality/value

The fuzzy logic approach was used in the determination of the societal decision-making on the extent of trust level. Fuzzy triangulation is mainly applied in the interpretation of the results. Further, overall parameters that determine the community trust on MHEW are represented through CLDs through system dynamics application.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2021

Maria-Isabel Sanchez-Segura, German-Lenin Dugarte-Peña, Antonio Amescua-Seco and Fuensanta Medina-Dominguez

Information technology/software (IT/SW) professionals use the business model canvas (BMC) to identify innovative digital solutions that improve their client’s business…

Abstract

Purpose

Information technology/software (IT/SW) professionals use the business model canvas (BMC) to identify innovative digital solutions that improve their client’s business values. This paper aims to address the issue of considering, for a client company, the status of its intangible assets (IAs) in decision-making on the most innovative digital solution.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a method (BMCIA-method) and a simulation tool (BMCIA-NetSim) to help IT/SW professionals identify and assess an organization’s IAs and their impact on the BMC of digital business.

Findings

IT/SW professionals used this approach, at 14 small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), to identify innovative solutions and add digital value to their businesses. They used the BMCIA to provide their clients (SME’s chief executive officer or chief operating officer) with a view of the BMC enhanced with the status of IAs. These expressed interest in the use of the BMCIA and underscore its importance for making better decisions while aligning IT and the business. A survey reveals how well the BMCIA-method performed during its use to discover the best solution to be developed at each SME.

Research limitations/implications

IAs affect the achievement of the business goal targeted using the BMC. If these are not identified, valued and properly aligned with the BMC blocks, critical information is hidden from the eyes of IT/SW professionals and their clients, preventing optimal decision-making on which is the best IT/SW solution to be implemented to add digital value to the client company.

Originality/value

This proposal is unique insofar as it outlines a simulation-based methodological and technical solution using software agents to simulate the impact of the intangible side of an organization on its business model.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the coastal disaster resilience and the disaster management framework of Sri Lanka, by conducting a case study in a few coastal areas in the district of Matara which were majorly affected in 2004 by the Indian Ocean Tsunami. Although it has been 15 years since the disaster struck the country, Sri Lanka is still struggling in building back better. This reveals the need to strengthen the action plan toward coastal disaster management by identifying the barriers and challenges that still exist in policies and frameworks, the use of technology in evacuation planning, implementation of evacuation plans and capacity building of the community.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted through structured and in-depth interviews among the general public and government officials targeting the eventual outcome as to ascertain barriers incorporated with the disaster management framework and then possible improvements to the framework were identified and suggested.

Findings

The findings showed that the practice of an administrative-oriented disaster management framework was a key element in creating a welfare-oriented community that is still building back better in Matara, which was one of the worst affected cities in the country during the 2004 Tsunami.

Originality/value

This paper facilitates resilience development by identifying the overall development of the system after 2004. The required modifications needed to strengthen the system have thereby been identified through the developed output which was produced by analyzing the barriers and challenges.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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