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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Xing Zhang

Depressive symptoms are higher among racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Many studies have evidenced associations between school disconnectedness and

Abstract

Depressive symptoms are higher among racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Many studies have evidenced associations between school disconnectedness and depressive symptoms by race and ethnicity in adolescence (Joyce & Early, 2014; Walsemann, Bell, & Maitra, 2011). Given that adolescents spend most of their time at home when they are not at school (Larson & Richards, 2001), it is important to understand how mother-child relationships may moderate school disconnectedness, and how mother–child relationships may serve as a protective buffer for depressive symptoms in the transition to adulthood. I use data from Waves II and III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) from 1995 to 2002 (n = 9,766) and OLS regression analysis to examine how school disconnectedness in adolescence is associated with depressive symptoms in the transition to adulthood, and how mother–child relationships in adolescence moderate these associations in the United States. I examine differences in these relationships across racial and ethnic groups. I find that school disconnectedness in adolescence is associated with increased depressive symptoms in the transition to adulthood, and that maternal warmth and communication moderates the association between school disconnectedness and depressive symptoms. Maternal relationship quality in adolescence serves as an important protective factor for mental health in the transition to adulthood.

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Transitions into Parenthood: Examining the Complexities of Childrearing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-222-0

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Michelle F. Wright

The purpose of this paper is to examine the association of bullying perpetration and victimization to non-suicidal self-harm and suicidal ideation among 93 boys from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the association of bullying perpetration and victimization to non-suicidal self-harm and suicidal ideation among 93 boys from residential programs. Parental warmth was also examined as a moderator in these associations.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants completed questionnaires on their bullying involvement, parental warmth, non-suicidal self-harm, and suicidal ideation.

Findings

The findings revealed that bullying perpetration and victimization were both associated positively with non-suicidal self-harm and suicidal ideation, while parental warmth was related negatively to non-suicidal self-harm and suicidal ideation. In addition, the association between victimization and non-suicidal self-harm was stronger at lower levels of parental warmth, while these patterns were weaker at higher levels of parental warmth. Similar patterns were found for victimization and suicidal ideation.

Originality/value

The results indicate the significance of examining non-suicidal self-harm and suicidal ideation in relation to bullying involvement among adolescents from residential programs as well as the important role of parents in mitigating the negative effects associated with bullying perpetration and victimization.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Bassem E. Maamari and Joelle F. Majdalani

This paper aims to investigate the effect of emotional intelligence (EI) on the leader’s applied leadership style (mediator) and the effect of this style on the employees…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of emotional intelligence (EI) on the leader’s applied leadership style (mediator) and the effect of this style on the employees’ organizational citizenship (responsibility, reward and warmth and support).

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers are proposing a model that highlights the mediating role of leadership style on the relationship between leaders’ EI and employees’ feeling of organizational climate. The study follows the quantitative process. A survey is prepared for data collection and for statistically testing the proposed model.

Findings

The results show that the leaders’ EI does affect his/her leadership style. Moreover, the leaders’ style affects directly the respective employees’ feeling of organizational climate to varying levels. The variance between different styles is found to be small.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study include the minimal cross-check interviews. The sample size’s limitation resulted in the researchers’ inability to compare the different sub-sectors of the economy (labelled as the type of work of the firm) to derive deeper conclusions by economic/business sector.

Practical implications

The study reveals a number of practical implications affecting communication, performance, stability and tenure, and thereby lower turnover.

Social implications

The social implications of this study include the social relationships within the work-setting, higher empathy and higher levels of norming as a direct result of improving the leader’s EI level.

Originality/value

The paper is based on a sample of respondents with a new model suggested and tested scientifically, following a rigorous process. It assesses the impact of both EI and organizational climate with leadership style.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Rong Huang, Xinyue Zhou, Weiling Ye and Siyuan Guo

This paper aims to clarify an important nuance by proposing that people attribute human mind to brands on two distinct dimensions: think and feel.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to clarify an important nuance by proposing that people attribute human mind to brands on two distinct dimensions: think and feel.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight studies were conducted to first develop and validate the 14-item Brand Anthropomorphism Questionnaire, and then to investigate how the two subscales, think or feel dimensions, influence consumer moral judgment of brands.

Findings

This research developed a 14-item Brand Anthropomorphism Questionnaire with two subscales, which are psychometrically sound and show discriminant validity with regard to existing brand constructs. Furthermore, think or feel brand anthropomorphism dimensions can predict consumers’ moral judgment of brands.

Research limitations/implications

The present research offers preliminary evidence about the value of distinguishing between think brand and feel brand in consumer moral judgment. Further research could investigate other potential impact of the two dimensions, and possible antecedents of think/feel dimensions.

Practical implications

Managers can use the scale for assessment, planning, decision-making and tracking purposes. In addition, in the event of brand scandal or brand social responsibility activities, public-relations efforts can use the findings to earn or regain the trust of consumers, as this research demonstrates that marketers can shape (tailor) the feel or think dimensions of brand perception to change consumers’ moral judgment of the brands.

Originality/value

This research makes theoretical contribution to the brand anthropomorphism literature by differentiating the two dimensions and exploring the influence of anthropomorphism of consumer moral judgment.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Sandy Cotter

Summarizes the basic principles of Bioenergetics along with its origin in Riechian psychology. Clarifies that Bioenergetics is used at Cranfield not as psychotherapy, but…

Abstract

Summarizes the basic principles of Bioenergetics along with its origin in Riechian psychology. Clarifies that Bioenergetics is used at Cranfield not as psychotherapy, but as an aid to personal development for a specific population of high‐functioning individuals, i.e. managers. Places the Bioenergetic body‐mind notion into a philosophical context of human goodness and potential; thus expanding the focus to body‐mind‐spirit. Examines five body‐mind types through the following aspects: how they operate at work; how they were formed; key attitudes; unique gifts; body shape; development path; how they are best managed. Case histories illustrating the different types in various modes of consultant intervention, i.e. individual development, team building and culture change.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

W.J. CAMPBELL, J.L. COTTERELL, N.M. ROBINSON and D.R. SADLER

Are the effects of school size transmitted in measurable quantities to the personalities of pupils? Having argued that the learning environments of small and large schools…

Abstract

Are the effects of school size transmitted in measurable quantities to the personalities of pupils? Having argued that the learning environments of small and large schools could differ in predictable ways, the authors examined the effects of these differences on the personality development of pupils. Multiple regression analysis revealed the effects of school size to be reflected in only two of eight personality outcomes — sense of cohesion and concern for persons. Two variables — attitude towards school and fear of failure — are regarded as “not proven” and four variables — functional identity, sense of internal control over events, breadth of role constructs, and cognitive complexity showed no evidence of the effects of school size.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Michael J. Keeney, Andrea F. Snell, Steven J. Robison, Daniel V. Svyantek and Jennifer Bott

Measures of personality and organizational climate were subjected to three different analytical methods that extract patterns from data: Discriminant, Classification and

Abstract

Measures of personality and organizational climate were subjected to three different analytical methods that extract patterns from data: Discriminant, Classification and Regression Trees, and neural network classification analysis. Risk, openness, rewards, and neuroticism (rather than conscientiousness) emerged as key variables in differentiating among three similar work groups. Results of the analyses support the central hypothesis of ASA theory of greater variance in personality across compared to within organizations and an interactionist paradigm between person and environment. Implications for ASA theory and for personnel selection are discussed.

Details

Organizational Analysis, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1551-7470

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Minwir M. Al‐Shammari

This study explores the differences in climate perceptions according to employees' demographic (age, gender, marital status, and education) and organizational (tenure…

Abstract

This study explores the differences in climate perceptions according to employees' demographic (age, gender, marital status, and education) and organizational (tenure, position, and pay) background patterns. In order to achieve this goal, self‐administered questionnaires were distributed to 400 subjects in Jordanian manufacturing organizations. Usable answers were obtained from 297 subjects. The results of the study showed that the background of employees (with the exception of gender) were found to account for significant differences in the perception of several dimensions of climate.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2018

Khalid Arar and Izhar Oplatka

It is widely accepted that educational leaders and teachers need to manage and regulate their emotions continually, mainly because schooling and teaching processes expose…

Abstract

Purpose

It is widely accepted that educational leaders and teachers need to manage and regulate their emotions continually, mainly because schooling and teaching processes expose many emotions. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to trace the ways Israeli assistant principals, both Arab and Jewish, manage their emotions at work.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on semi-structured interviews with 15 assistant principals, it was found that they are required to manage their emotions in accordance with entrenched emotion rules in the culture and society.

Findings

Most of the Jewish female APs tend to display warmth and empathy toward teachers in order to better understand their personal needs and professional performances. In contrast, Arab APs suppressed or fabricated emotional expression in their discourse with teachers and parents, in order to maintain a professional façade and retain the internal cohesion of the school. Both groups of APs believed their emotion regulation results in higher level of harmony in the school. Empirical and practical suggestions are put forward.

Originality/value

The paper is original and contributes to the theoretical and practical knowledge.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Reva Berman Brown and Ian Brooks

This paper introduces the concept of the emotional climate of the workplace and explores how it both shapes and is shaped by the emotions experienced, expressed and

Abstract

This paper introduces the concept of the emotional climate of the workplace and explores how it both shapes and is shaped by the emotions experienced, expressed and redefined by nurses. It extracts emotional aspects of an organizational climate framework developed by Litwin and Stringer and examines these with respect to nurse’s experiences. The primary research was carried out at a general hospital NHS Trust in the East Midlands of the UK using a grounded theory methodology. The research methods included semi‐structured interviews and observation. The themes identified include many of those found by Litwin and Stringer, others which represent variations upon these, and a new set, which, when combined, identify the emotional climate of the organization. The findings have confirmed that the “experiment” of using a 33‐year‐old positivistic framework to investigate aspects of qualitative research has enabled a robust contribution to the conceptual area of emotional climate.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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