Search results

1 – 10 of 957
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Christopher Dodge

The winter 1991 issue of Reference Services Review featured an annotated bibliography of literature on Christopher Columbus from 1970 to 1989. That literature covered such…

Abstract

The winter 1991 issue of Reference Services Review featured an annotated bibliography of literature on Christopher Columbus from 1970 to 1989. That literature covered such topics as Columbus' ancestry, heraldry, and the locations of both his American landfall and burial site. This annotated checklist focuses mainly on Columbus' legacy, on works that offer a dissenting point of view from most previous writings about Columbus (and on works that react to the dissenters), on material written by Native American and other non‐European authors, and on materials published by small and noncommercial presses.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2005

Jennifer Lehmann (Cedar EK Woman)

The title of this volume is a deliberate paraphrase of Louis Althusser's defense of a specific form of discourse, which he calls philosophy, and which I, like Bob Antonio…

Abstract

The title of this volume is a deliberate paraphrase of Louis Althusser's defense of a specific form of discourse, which he calls philosophy, and which I, like Bob Antonio, call social theory. Like Antonio, I use the term to distinguish this discourse, these discourses, from sociological theory; to insist on its critical potential; to insist on its public significance. I also use the term to insist on its necessarily conflictual character; and to insist on its ubiquity in all discourses, from the most esoteric to the most banal, as well as its articulation by all subjects, from the most “expert” to the most “vulgar.”

Details

Social Theory as Politics in Knowledge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-363-1

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2006

Karin M. Ekström

The purpose of this paper is to revitalize consumer socialization as a topic of study by presenting a critical review of the concept. The aim is to advance our current…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to revitalize consumer socialization as a topic of study by presenting a critical review of the concept. The aim is to advance our current understanding of conceptual issues and to outline issues and directions for future research. Consumer socialization can be better understood by studying its multidisciplinary roots and by critically reviewing its definition and meanings. It is suggested that the scope of consumer socialization be expanded to encompass life-long consumer socialization, different life events and spheres of consumption, dialogs, negotiations, and translations, as well as the socio-cultural context in which socialization occurs. In order to capture the complexity of consumer socialization and to maintain the field of consumer socialization as a vital research area, there is a need to rethink both the theories and the methods used. Researchers are encouraged to expand the use of socio-cultural theories and ethnographic methods. Interdisciplinary research is also recommended, allowing a multifaceted pluralism in the study of consumer socialization.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 0-7623-1304-8

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Ying Fan and Yixuan Li

The purpose of this paper is to report an empirical study on children's buying behaviour in China, with a special focus on their information sources.

Downloads
4080

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report an empirical study on children's buying behaviour in China, with a special focus on their information sources.

Design/methodology/approach

The key literature on consumer socialisation of children is reviewed. Primary data were collected from a sample of 155 children aged ten‐13 using questionnaire survey. Various statistical methods such as Pearson correlation and tests were employed to analyse the data.

Findings

Chinese children regard television commercials as an important information source for new products. However, they place greater level of trust in interpersonal information sources, especially in their parents who are perceived as the most credible information source with respect to their learning about new food products.

Originality/value

The paper has made a contribution to the extant literature on Chinese children as consumer. The findings would be valuable in assisting companies, specially those in the food industry, to have a better understanding of Chinese children's buying behaviour.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Carter Mandrik, Yeqing Bao and Sijun Wang

The purpose of this study is to examine the intergenerational influence across dyads of mothers and daughters from the USA and the People’s Republic of China (PRC), with a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the intergenerational influence across dyads of mothers and daughters from the USA and the People’s Republic of China (PRC), with a particular interest in discovering the cross-national differences in terms of the level of mother–daughter brand preference agreement, the directional influence from daughter to mother and leading factors for the observed differences.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a parallel survey method, responses were obtained regarding participants’ brand preferences, as well as their perceptions of their dyad partners’ preferences, for 20 product categories. A total of 76 dyads in the USA and 114 dyads in the PRC were collected.

Findings

Results not only confirmed the existence of intergenerational influence in mother–daughter dyads’ brand preferences after removing the nominal bias that previous studies commonly suffered but also suggested two interesting cross-national differences. Specifically, the authors find that US mother–daughter dyads possess a higher level of brand preference agreement than their PRC counterparts; however, the influence from daughters to mothers in the PRC is greater than in the USA. The authors further find that two potential leading factors contribute to the observed cross-national differences; mother–daughter communication is stronger but less influential in the USA than in the PRC, while children’s peer influence, measured as information influence of peers, is weaker but more influential in the USA than in the PRC.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding intergeneration influences in different cultural contexts may be applicable in developing communication strategies leading to brand preference.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the consumer socialization literature by examining the cross-national differences of intergenerational influence in brand preferences and their leading causes of such differences in the context of the two biggest economies.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Hagar Adib and Noha El‐Bassiouny

In the current highly commercialized environment, youth materialism is believed to be elevating. Given the adverse effects of materialism on society in general and on…

Downloads
2276

Abstract

Purpose

In the current highly commercialized environment, youth materialism is believed to be elevating. Given the adverse effects of materialism on society in general and on young consumers in particular, the purpose of this research is to gain a better understanding of youth materialism in Egypt along with parental influence in the transmission of materialistic values and hence building up recommendations and programs for impeding this phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical investigation was conducted through pursuing a mix of qualitative and quantitative research methods. A deeper understanding of the problem at hand was generated by the qualitative research through conducting in‐depth interviews with children, parents and educators; where the broader target was reached as well as a more comprehensive view was attained by quantitative research through self‐administered surveys for parents and children.

Findings

The results showed a positive correlation between parental materialism and child materialism. Concerning the relationships between family communication patterns, parental mediation practices and child materialism, the results indicated that indirect mediation was the strongest predictor for child materialism followed by restrictive mediation, while active mediation was not found as a significant predictor for child materialism.

Research limitations/implications

The purpose of this research is tri‐divided and limited to the following goals: first, capturing cultural differences for the manifestation of materialism in the Egyptian context. Second, examining the extent to which parents contribute and influence the transmission of materialistic values among young consumers. Third, proposing parents as a potential countervailing power against excessive youth materialism.

Practical implications

The results of the study show that necessary steps should be taken by designing programs that involve parents as a potential countervailing power against excessive youth materialism. The results also showed a positive relationship between parents and child materialism. Furthermore, the results from the qualitative research indicated that parents are not really aware of the adverse effects materialism can have on their children. Moreover, the results indicated that there is a positive correlation between socio‐oriented communication and restrictive mediation. At the same time and in line with the proposed conceptual model of the current research, restrictive mediation was found to be the second largest contributor to childhood materialism.

Social implications

It is suggested that greater transparency about the consequences of materialism could work in favor of altering materialism (Abela). Hence, parents should be aware that excess youth materialism, as previously discussed in the literature, is associated with poor school performance, poor ethical behavior, shoplifting tendencies, unhealthy food consumption, and greater levels of life dissatisfaction.

Originality/value

The research is unique in that it sets the ground for research in the critical area of young consumers in an important emerging market; Egypt. In addition, the novel interdisciplinary approach also contributes to the international literature in terms of both conceptualization and findings.

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2005

Ward Churchill

There is no argument among serious researchers that a mongoloid stock first colonized the New World from Asia. Nor is there controversy about the fact that these…

Abstract

There is no argument among serious researchers that a mongoloid stock first colonized the New World from Asia. Nor is there controversy about the fact that these continental pioneers used the Bering Land Bridge that then connected the Asian Far East with Alaska.– Gerald F. Shields, et al.American Journal of Genetics (1992)

Details

Social Theory as Politics in Knowledge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-363-1

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 10 October 2007

Chris Cunneen

Abstract

Details

Crime and Human Rights
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-056-9

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 15 January 2020

Naghmeh Sabermajidi, Naser Valaei, M.S. Balaji and See Kwong Goh

Building on consumer socialization theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine antecedents and consequences of generating and sharing brand-related content on social…

Downloads
1077

Abstract

Purpose

Building on consumer socialization theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine antecedents and consequences of generating and sharing brand-related content on social media in a restaurant context.

Design/methodology/approach

A scale development process was undertaken to develop the scale for brand-related user-generated content (BRUGC). Then the authors tested the antecedents and consequences of BRUGC using 375 responses obtained through a mall-intercept survey. The hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling with AMOS.

Findings

Study findings revealed that age, time on Facebook, number of Facebook friends, Facebook usage intensity, and need for self-enhancement were key antecedents of both the generation and sharing of BRUGC. The results also indicated that gender, race and need for self-affirmation were not significantly related to generating and sharing BRUGC. Both generating and sharing BRUGC were positively associated with attitude and intentions toward the restaurants.

Originality/value

This study is the first to develop a BRUGC scale through a rigorous scale development process. It thus contributes to consumer socialization theory literature in considering social media as a socialization agent. The findings provide valuable insights for both academicians and social media managers and aid in enhancing BRUGC.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Jill Kurp Maher, John B. Lord, Renée Shaw Hughner and Nancy M. Childs

This research investigates the changes in the types of advertised food products and the use of nutritional versus consumer appeals in children’s advertising from 2000 to 2005.

Downloads
3050

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates the changes in the types of advertised food products and the use of nutritional versus consumer appeals in children’s advertising from 2000 to 2005.

Design/methodology/approach

Content Analysis.

Findings

Results indicate that food processors and restaurants have not changed their advertising messages to children in response to the multitude of pressures the industry is facing. Specifically, this pre‐post longitudinal comparison shows no significant change regarding types of food products advertised and type of appeals used in the ads directed to children.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the sample studied. While the ads recorded all came from television programming aimed specifically at children, there was no specification or ability to classify the consumers according to the age of the viewer. Additionally, duplicate exposures of the ads were not included in the study.

Practical implications

Obesity is a serious and expanding concern for our children’s health. As past advertising research and socialization theory suggest, children’s exposure to advertising has impact. It is important to monitor changes in food advertising to children in the future to ascertain whether and to what extent food companies are able to change both what they advertise and the appeals they use to gain consumers’, in this case, children’s attention.

Originality/value

This study provides a useful baseline (prior to 2001) and benchmark (post 2001) to longitudinally examine the food product and appeal usage in food advertising directed to children. This will be useful information for advertisers, for parents, for regulators and for special interest groups, all of whom have a common goal – healthy kids.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

1 – 10 of 957