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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Wally Barr, Maria Leitner and Joan Thomas

Although self‐harm is most common in younger people in Britain, the risk of suicide subsequent to an initial act of self‐harm is considerably greater in older age groups…

Abstract

Although self‐harm is most common in younger people in Britain, the risk of suicide subsequent to an initial act of self‐harm is considerably greater in older age groups. Four characteristics have been shown to be associated with increased vulnerability in older people who self‐harm: increased suicidal intent, physical illness, mental illness and social isolation. This paper is part of a broader analysis of all self‐harm presentations to a British hospital accident and emergency department over a five‐year period. It examines the prevalence of these vulnerability indicators in patients aged 65 or over, and considers whether greater vulnerability in older patients is reflected in their clinical management within the hospital and in community support planning on discharge.At the first presentation older patients (n=91) exhibited greater vulnerability than did younger patients (n=2,326). Despite this, we found no evidence that older self‐harm patients were any more likely than younger patients to routinely receive either a psychosocial assessment from a member of staff with specialist mental health training, or community aftercare planning on discharge from the hospital. This study lends weight to recently published national guidelines recommending that all acts of self‐harm in older people be regarded as evidence of serious suicidal intent at the outset.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Ron Iphofen

Abstract

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Lesley Cotterill and Diane Taylor

In England health promotion has an important role to play in delivering the aims of the new health and social care modernisation programme. Two health promotion strategies…

Abstract

In England health promotion has an important role to play in delivering the aims of the new health and social care modernisation programme. Two health promotion strategies evident in recent policy documents concern the provision of good quality information and encouraging greater social participation. Providing information about health issues is intended to empower people, promote independence and help them to become, and stay, healthy. Encouraging social participation is intended to reduce social isolation and stress, build social capital, and promote mental health and wellbeing. This paper presents findings from a qualitative sociological study of an Ageing Well project for housebound older people relevant to these policy goals. The findings reveal what older people valued about participating in the project, and how it enhanced their sense of wellbeing. It is argued that, for this group of people, ‘feeling happy’ and maintaining a positive sense of wellbeing were transitory experiences involving a range of strategies to ‘manage’ information. The lessons for health promotion from this study suggest that providing health‐related information may conflict with, rather than complement, efforts to promote mental health by compromising the ways in which people in difficult circumstances construct their sense of wellbeing and strive to feel happy.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Caroline Hare

The growing numbers of older people represent an important market segment for retailers, particularly the food retail sector. The dominance of the food multiples and their…

Abstract

The growing numbers of older people represent an important market segment for retailers, particularly the food retail sector. The dominance of the food multiples and their growth strategies have been criticised for contributing to some older consumers being disadvantaged. This paper considers the satisfaction levels of older consumers in Scotland, with their food‐shopping experience. Drawing upon previous work by the author which identified the factors influencing satisfaction, 220 volunteers were recruited from various locations in Scotland and interviewed using a structured questionnaire. The survey focused on the main shopping trip. Results indicate that, whilst there is a general trend towards satisfaction, there are key areas of dissatisfaction, such as aspects of the products for sale (merchandise), the practices and procedures of the retailer (retail practices) and factors in the community which affected the shopping trip (external shopping factors). This suggests that policy‐makers seeking to encourage the participation of food retailers in health promotion need to recognise vulnerable sub‐groups of the older population and recognise that not all older consumers can signal their preferences in the marketplace.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Patrice Braun

The paper seeks to explore whether women entrepreneurs may be more engaged with green issues than their male counterparts. The study was undertaken to add to our…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to explore whether women entrepreneurs may be more engaged with green issues than their male counterparts. The study was undertaken to add to our understanding of gendered attitudes and behaviours around green entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for a mixed method exploratory study consisting of quantitative datasets from two regional studies on environmental attitudes and behaviour and qualitative data generated as part of an Australian green entrepreneurship training program.

Findings

The study found that participating women had stronger environmental attitudes and commitment to the green entrepreneurship program than males, suggesting that women entrepreneurs may be more engaged in green issues than male entrepreneurs.

Research limitations/implications

Given the exploratory study approach, research results lack generalisability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed framework.

Practical implications

Understanding gendered behaviours has implications for policy and education in terms of greening the small business sector. It also has implications for business innovation, the green marketplace and a sustainable post‐carbon future.

Originality/value

The paper helps lay the foundation for comprehensive research on women entrepreneurs' engagement with environmental issues and green entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1981

BERNARD BARR

HOW rich does one have to be to qualify as poor? This Irishism has to be asked at the outset because ECBB, as the work under review will no doubt become known officially…

Abstract

HOW rich does one have to be to qualify as poor? This Irishism has to be asked at the outset because ECBB, as the work under review will no doubt become known officially, is bound to be popularly regarded as the poor library's ESTC. The reviewer, who happens to be in charge of one library with no prospects of paying a four‐figure sum for a reference tool, and to work on behalf of another library which will have to consider very carefully whether to spend such a sum on this single tool or or a larger number of alternative titles, is only too well aware of the reality of this question.

Details

Library Review, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Osama Mah'd

Educational institutions in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) are striving for better resource management and finance. The bottom-up budgeting approach plays an…

Abstract

Purpose

Educational institutions in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) are striving for better resource management and finance. The bottom-up budgeting approach plays an important role in motivating executives' performance. The main aim of this paper is to discover whether there is a significant difference between bottom-up and a top-down approaches to budgeting in terms of managers' performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were distributed to 453 university executives in 21 MENA educational institutions. The Kruskal–Wallis test was utilized to test the difference between the three groups (bottom-up, top-down and consultative approaches). Further analysis was conducted to test the difference between the two groups using the Mann–Whitney test.

Findings

The results show that there is a significant difference between a bottom-up and top-down approach in terms of managerial performance. The study's findings indicate that the bottom-up approach to budgeting leads to higher performance indicators than a top-down approach to budgeting.

Originality/value

The current study contributes to the research as it increases awareness of budgeting approaches that are used in higher education institutions, specifically in terms of the effect of these differences on executives' performance.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Jason W. Ridge, Dave Kern and Margaret A. White

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of temporal myopia (focussing on the short-term) and spatial myopia (focussing on the current market) on firm strategy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of temporal myopia (focussing on the short-term) and spatial myopia (focussing on the current market) on firm strategy. Specifically the paper investigates the effects of temporal and spatial myopia on the persistence and conformity of firm strategy. Additionally, the paper tests how environmental munificence moderates these effects. A secondary purpose of this paper is to develop a replicable method of measurement of temporal and spatial myopia.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a manual content analysis of letters to shareholders for 100 firms over three years to measure spatial and temporal myopia. After collecting strategy variables and control variables from Compustat, the authors utilize a random-effects panel methodology.

Findings

The results indicate that strategy is influenced by both temporal and spatial myopia. Specifically, temporal myopia creates a focus on the firm's current strategy, leading to a persistent strategy over time and spatial myopia focusses firm decision makers on better known technologies and competitors, leading to conformity to industry strategic profiles. Additionally, the paper tests how environmental munificence influences these relationships. In total, the paper finds that the differing types of managerial myopia have distinct influences on firm outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper makes two important contributions to the literature on managerial myopia. First, the paper investigates the differential effects of both spatial and temporal myopia on firm strategy, topics that have been relatively overlooked in empirical investigations of decision making. Second, the paper develops replicable measures for both temporal and spatial myopia, which have been previously suggested to limit the ability to empirically test the implications of managerial myopia (Laverty, 1996).

Details

Management Decision, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Fadzlan Sufian and Suarddy Parman

The purpose of the present study is to provide empirical evidence on the factors that influence non‐commercial bank financial institutions (NCBFIs) profitability in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to provide empirical evidence on the factors that influence non‐commercial bank financial institutions (NCBFIs) profitability in a developing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The least squares methods of random effects, fixed effects, and ordinary least square models are employed to examine the NCBFIs specific and macroeconomic determinants of NCBFI profitability.

Findings

The findings indicate that NCBFI with a high loans intensity and credit risk tend to exhibit lower profitability level. On the other hand, large and more diversified NCBFI with high operational expenses and level of capitalization tend to exhibit higher profitability level.

Research limitations/implications

Further analysis into the investigation of Malaysian NCBFIs performance is to examine the efficiency changes over time by employing the non‐parametric data envelopment analysis and/or the parametric Stochastic Frontier Analysis methods. Investigations into productivity changes over time, as a result of a technical change or technological progress or regress by employing the Malmquist productivity index could yet be another extension to the paper.

Originality/value

The paper aims to fill a demanding gap in the literature by providing empirical evidence on the determinants of the profitability of non‐commercial banks financial institutions.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2015

Byungchae Jin and David A. Kirsch

Why do some ventures grow to become dominant market players while most new ventures that do not fail limp along more modest trajectories? In comparison with our knowledge…

Abstract

Why do some ventures grow to become dominant market players while most new ventures that do not fail limp along more modest trajectories? In comparison with our knowledge regarding determinants of venture creation or survival, the phenomenon of venture growth has been relatively neglected, both theoretically and empirically. Venture growth is a multi-level phenomenon co-occurring at different analytical and temporal levels. In this chapter we develop a theoretical model that accounts for venture growth as a process, drawing upon the mechanism-based theorizing approach. We offer nine social mechanisms that lead to venture growth, providing a foundation for empirical exploration and further theory building.

Details

Entrepreneurial Growth: Individual, Firm, and Region
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-047-0

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