Search results

1 – 10 of 20
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1929

IT is the intention of the German Aircraft Industry to reciprocate the visit of their friends of the British Industry to the Berlin Exhibition last year and a number of…

Abstract

IT is the intention of the German Aircraft Industry to reciprocate the visit of their friends of the British Industry to the Berlin Exhibition last year and a number of firms concerned will therefore secure admission to Olympia in serried ranks, for the purpose of showing, for the first time, their products to the British Public. It will be a matter of particular importance to the German Trades concerned, to see to it that their representation at the British Show at the Olympia is worthy of the occasion.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1929

Waldemar Beck

OWING to the various competitions in Germany last year one type was neglected, a moderately high‐powered machine for stunt flying. The Raab‐Katzenstein firm has now filled…

Abstract

OWING to the various competitions in Germany last year one type was neglected, a moderately high‐powered machine for stunt flying. The Raab‐Katzenstein firm has now filled the gap with the “R.K. 26,” which combines high strength factor with speed and rapid climb. This machine is a cantilever biplane with one‐piece wings. Above the fuselage the top wing is carried on a capotage of steel struts and there is one N‐strut towards the wing‐tip on each side. The American N.A.C.A. M‐12 aerofoil section is used, giving low centre of pressure travel, the wings being constructed of wood and fabric covered. The fuselage is built up of wire‐braced steel‐tubes, the pilot's cockpit being in rear of the passenger seat. The empennage is also constructed of steel tubes. The tubular steel undercarriage has a divided circle supported by M struts for the bottom longerons. Four fuel tanks are provided, three in the wings and a special tank for upside‐down flying in the fuselage, with a total capacity of 210 litres (46 gallons).

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 1 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1930

Waldemar C. Beck

AT a flying meeting arranged jointly by the Mecklenburg Aero Club and the Deutsche Verkehrs Fliegerschule held at Warnemunde during the summer several interesting new…

Abstract

AT a flying meeting arranged jointly by the Mecklenburg Aero Club and the Deutsche Verkehrs Fliegerschule held at Warnemunde during the summer several interesting new types of aeroplane made their appearance.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 2 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1930

Waldemar Beck

COUNTLESS practical and theoretical proposals have been made for the prevention of auto‐rotation. Exact science has long been well acquainted with the actual aerodynamical…

Abstract

COUNTLESS practical and theoretical proposals have been made for the prevention of auto‐rotation. Exact science has long been well acquainted with the actual aerodynamical process. In Germany, Prof. Fuchs of Berlin and Prof. Hopf of Aix‐la‐Chapelle may be named as leading experts engaged in the investigation of auto‐rotation. The Deutsche Versuchsanstalt für Luftfahrt has also provided very valuable contributions to the study of the problem. Among English workers may be named Bairstow, Bryant, Gates and Hall, while it is an Englishman, Handley‐Page, with his famous slotted wing, who has made the most practical progress. This invention at least enables the machine to maintain lateral stability when it gets too steeply banked, that is it prevents one wing from dropping. Nevertheless, neither the Handley‐Page slotted wing nor any other device can quite preclude the danger of auto‐rotation. Intentional or unintentional error in manipulation still tend to produce auto‐rotation.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1929

Waldemar Beck

THE science of aviation with mechanically propelled aeroplanes which has only been in existence a few years has now reached a fresh turning point in its development. Ever…

Abstract

THE science of aviation with mechanically propelled aeroplanes which has only been in existence a few years has now reached a fresh turning point in its development. Ever since the Wright brothers carried out their first experiments up to the present day, the only fuel used in aeroplane engines has been a light explosive in the form of benzine or some similar rapid burning product which is highly inflammable and very uneconomical on account of the large quantities which have to be consumed. This was rendered necessary by the fact that the overall dimensions of the earlier aeroplanes were relatively small, so that the installation of heavy engines was impossible, because the load would have been so great that the aeroplane would have been unable to rise from the ground. It is not at all surprising, therefore, that designers and builders in all countries have for many years been trying to replace the light fuel engine which is both dangerous and uneconomical by a heavy oil engine which is more economical and cheaper to run. But, until quite recently, all these efforts have been unavailing. A few weeks ago Prof. Hugo Junkers of Dessau succeeded in bringing out a heavy oil engine which was submitted to practical trials in the air, and proved that the experiments hitherto carried out are now definitely approaching a state of realisation.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1931

Waldemar C. Beck

BESIDES testing and the investigations resulting directly therefrom, the chief work of the D.V.L. is technical development.

Abstract

BESIDES testing and the investigations resulting directly therefrom, the chief work of the D.V.L. is technical development.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1930

Waldemar C. Beck

THE Siemens SH.20, which can be supplied with or without reduction gear, has a total swept volume of 31·5 litres and a power output of 500–560 h.p., and is one of the…

Abstract

THE Siemens SH.20, which can be supplied with or without reduction gear, has a total swept volume of 31·5 litres and a power output of 500–560 h.p., and is one of the largest and most powerful air‐cooled engines in the world.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 2 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1930

Waldemar C.A. Beck

THE automatic control of an aeroplane must stabilise in relation to the three axes. The ideal control must relieve the strain on the pilot's nerves and body throughout the…

Abstract

THE automatic control of an aeroplane must stabilise in relation to the three axes. The ideal control must relieve the strain on the pilot's nerves and body throughout the flight, and leave him free for navigation. It must pilot the machine, no matter what the weather, in a smooth flight, through clouds and fog. Its use will therefore mean saving in human energy, greater safety in flight, and increase in efficiency.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1930

R. Schulz

THE development of the Diesel engine for aeroplanes in Germany was first taken up by the Junker works, in Dessau. Junkers began building oil engines more than twenty years…

Abstract

THE development of the Diesel engine for aeroplanes in Germany was first taken up by the Junker works, in Dessau. Junkers began building oil engines more than twenty years ago with the construction of large Diesel engines. Later on they produced the well‐known stationary “HK” engines, and recently also small high‐speed engines for vehicles. Simultaneously with this began the development of the heavy oil engine for aeroplanes.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1930

FOLLOWING the Air Convention held on the 13th of October, 1919, the I.C.A.N. (International Commission for Air Navigation) laid clown the minimum requirements for…

Abstract

FOLLOWING the Air Convention held on the 13th of October, 1919, the I.C.A.N. (International Commission for Air Navigation) laid clown the minimum requirements for Air‐worthiness Certificates for Civil Aircraft, and the regulations for the testing and approval of type and series engines are the subject of Part 5 of their official recommendations.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 2 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

1 – 10 of 20