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Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2008

Jorgen Hansen and Roger Wahlberg

This paper examines the relationship between the gender wage gap and occupational gender segregation in Sweden. The results show that the gender wage gap varies…

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between the gender wage gap and occupational gender segregation in Sweden. The results show that the gender wage gap varies substantially across occupations. It is small in male-dominated occupations and relatively large in female-dominated occupations. Further, as much as 30% of the overall gender wage gap in Sweden can be attributed to occupational segregation by gender. Finally, the return to work experience for women is substantially higher in male-dominated occupations than in female-dominated occupations, suggesting that the cost for work interruptions are lower in female-dominated occupations than in male-dominated occupations. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that women choose occupations in which the penalty for work interruptions is low. Thus, occupational segregation may arise because of gender differences in preferences for occupational characteristics and not necessarily because of discriminatory practices by employers.

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Work, Earnings and Other Aspects of the Employment Relation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-552-9

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Panel Data and Structural Labour Market Models
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-319-0

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Suzan Abd El Moneim El Balshy and Mamdouh Ismael

This paper aims to present a theoretical framework which reveals the relationship between job evaluation (JE) and the development of fair wage structure from the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a theoretical framework which reveals the relationship between job evaluation (JE) and the development of fair wage structure from the organizational justice (OJ) perspective. It focuses on analyzing the dimensions of job-based pay structure and the use of multifaceted construct of OJ (procedures, distribution and interaction) to determine how the perceived justice of JE's multi-levels construct contributes to achieve the fairness of wage structure.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts an analytical descriptive approach in terms of explaining the perspectives and viewpoints related to the analysis. This paper is based on examining a theoretical framework provided by the authors based on a theoretical review of literature and a set of empirical evidences.

Findings

The design of a hierarchical wage structure counts on the multidimensional approach of JE which consists of three dimensions (processes, outcomes and social system). In addition, the determination of wage structure fairness is dependent on the assessment of the perceived justice of: JE's procedures, wages distribution and management's treatment with its employees.

Originality/value

This study provides a new theoretical contribution in studying the relationship between JE and the design of fair wage structure. This contribution can be regarded as a theoretical foundation for conducting some empirical and comparative studies in the future. The study affords directive mechanisms to policymakers in order to enhance the fairness of the wage structure across the state.

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Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-279X

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Svitlana Tsymbaliuk and Tetiana Shkoda

High European standards of life quality are declared in a set of legislative documents in Ukraine, but the rewarding policy for the healthcare employees because of the…

Abstract

Purpose

High European standards of life quality are declared in a set of legislative documents in Ukraine, but the rewarding policy for the healthcare employees because of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease remains not fully implemented. The purpose of the study is to develop indicators, standards and methods of assessing rewarding policies for healthcare employees in terms of providing decent labour remuneration that are useful for all stakeholders of the healthcare sector in Ukraine.

Design/methodology/approach

The study proposes the methodical foundations of developing evaluation tools of rewarding policies for implementing the decent work concept at the sectoral level.

Findings

The findings identify the complex indicator of decent labour remuneration in the healthcare sector in Ukraine, which is 0.185. It proves that the level of the decent labour remuneration of the healthcare employees in Ukraine is at the low level.

Practical implications

The study provides the important recommendations for all policymakers in the healthcare sector in different countries in the context of diagnosing the problems in the rewarding policies and determining the directions for improvement in terms of implementation of the decent work principles.

Originality/value

By proposing and calculating the main methodical foundations of evaluation tools development of rewarding policies in the context of realisation of the decent work concept at the sectoral level, the study fills a void in the decent labour remuneration and the labour economics theory literature.

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Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Naouel Ben Jemaa Cherif

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of training on labor productivity and wages in order to examine how the benefits from training are shared between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of training on labor productivity and wages in order to examine how the benefits from training are shared between employers and employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzes an industry panel covering all sectors of the Tunisian economy for the period 2000–2014. The panel structure of the data allows controlling for the endogeneity of training by using different panel data techniques.

Findings

Results show that both employers and workers benefit from training since it has a positive and significant effect on productivity and wages. However, the effect of training on productivity is substantially higher than on wages, suggesting that employers obtain the largest part of the returns to training. This result is consistent with theories that explain firm-sponsored training by a compressed wage structure in imperfect labor markets.

Originality/value

This study, particularly showcasing the labor market in Tunisia, is one of the first to provide estimates for a developing country to assess the effects of training for both employer and employee. It is also among the few empirical works that analyzed the impact of training on labor productivity and wages simultaneously.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Luisa Rosti and Francesco Chelli

The purpose of this paper is to verify whether higher education increases the likelihood of young Italian workers moving from non‐standard to standard wage contracts.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to verify whether higher education increases the likelihood of young Italian workers moving from non‐standard to standard wage contracts.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors exploit a data set on labour market flows, produced by the Italian National Statistical Office, by interviewing about 85,000 graduate and non‐graduate individuals aged 15‐29 in transition between five labour market states: standard wage employment; non‐standard wage employment; self‐employment; unemployment; inactivity. From these data, an average six‐year transition matrix was constructed whose coefficients can be interpreted as probabilities of moving from one state to another over time.

Findings

As the authors find evidence for the so‐called stepping stone hypothesis (that is, a higher probability of moving to a permanent job for individuals starting from a temporary job), the authors expect graduates to be more likely to pass from non‐standard to standard wage contracts than non‐graduates, because the signalling effect of education is enhanced by the stepping stone effect of non‐standard wage contracts. Nevertheless, the authors find that non‐standard wage contracts of graduates are more likely to be terminated as bad job/worker matches.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the empirical literature on the probability of young workers moving from non‐standard wage contracts to a permanent job. By separating graduates from non‐graduates, it was found that education reduces the likelihood of passing from non‐standard to standard wage contracts. The authors interpret this result as evidence of the changing labour market that makes it more difficult to infer the productivity of graduates as opposed to non‐graduates.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Javier Suarez

This study explores the impact of import competition on wages and employment at the industry level. We estimate reduced‐form, industry‐level wage and employment equations…

Abstract

This study explores the impact of import competition on wages and employment at the industry level. We estimate reduced‐form, industry‐level wage and employment equations. We find that, in a majority of industries, a toughening of import competition tends to reduce employment and to have an adverse effect on workers’ wages, but the magnitude of this impact is relatively modest. Our results suggest that import price variations have had very little influence on the domestic labour market.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

John Creedy

In the last decade there has been considerable interest in theanalysis of Trade Union behaviour, but surprisingly little discussion ofthe effect of tax changes on wage

Abstract

In the last decade there has been considerable interest in the analysis of Trade Union behaviour, but surprisingly little discussion of the effect of tax changes on wage demands. Previous analyses have been limited by the use of simple tax structures. The discussion is extended by considering a multi‐rate tax system that can easily be applied to most countries. The effect on unions′ wage demands of eliminating the top marginal tax rate, while raising VAT, is examined in detail. It is shown that this policy can be expected to lead to an increase in the wage demands of all unions, producing a once‐and‐for‐all increase in nominal wages and unemployment.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Chor Foon Tang

The aim of this study is to empirically investigate the effect of real wages on labour productivity in Malaysia's manufacturing sector using annual data from 1980 to 2009.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to empirically investigate the effect of real wages on labour productivity in Malaysia's manufacturing sector using annual data from 1980 to 2009.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the Johansen cointegration test to examine the presence of long‐run equilibrium relationship between labour productivity and real wages in Malaysia. In addition, the Granger causality test within the vector error‐correction model (VECM) is used to ascertain the direction of causality between the variables of interest.

Findings

The Johansen test suggests that real wages and labour productivity are cointegrated. Moreover, labour productivity and real wages have a quadratic relationship (i.e. inverted U‐shaped curve) instead of linear relationship. Hence, the effect of real wages on labour productivity is non‐monotonic. Furthermore, the Granger causality test indicates that real wages and labour productivity are bilateral causality in nature.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to the labour productivity in the manufacturing sector only.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that the effect of real wages on labour productivity is non‐monotonic; hence increase in real wages alone does not always enhance labour productivity. Thus, other incentives should be offered to stimulate long‐term labour productivity growth in Malaysia.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Patrick Minford and Paul Ashton

This article considers the impact of minimumwage legislation on wages, employment and grossdomestic product. Using the Liverpool quarterlymodel of the UK to calculate the…

Abstract

This article considers the impact of minimum wage legislation on wages, employment and gross domestic product. Using the Liverpool quarterly model of the UK to calculate the total effects in the economy, the authors suggest that unemployment would increase along with the real wages of low paid workers.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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