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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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WILLIAM L. BOYD and GLENN L. IMMEGART

In order to iniestigate the problems of educational innovation in depressed rural communities, and the efficacy of strategies for change employed by state and federal…

Abstract

In order to iniestigate the problems of educational innovation in depressed rural communities, and the efficacy of strategies for change employed by state and federal authorities in the United States, data were gathered in four areas of rural Appalachia and three rural communities in New York. An analysis of these data, and a mien of other relet ant data, indicate that the assumptions underlying prevailing strategies for change are often poorly in tune with the social and political realities of depressed rural communities. These findings point to a need for more realistic innovation strategies as well as a need for more research on this problem.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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William L. Boyd, Myron Leonard and Charles White

With bank deregulation and more sophisticated customers, it has becomevery important that banks and other financial institutions determine thefactors which are pertinent…

Abstract

With bank deregulation and more sophisticated customers, it has become very important that banks and other financial institutions determine the factors which are pertinent to the customer′s selection process. Through a survey of households, evaluates the relative importance attached to selection criteria used to choose a financial institution. The results provide the basis for a demographic and behavioural profile which is used to examine the emphasis of some criteria over others.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article

David A. Gamson

Examines the history of educational administration in the USA during the Progressive era (1890‐1940). Using Callahan's Education and the Cult of Efficiency as a starting…

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Examines the history of educational administration in the USA during the Progressive era (1890‐1940). Using Callahan's Education and the Cult of Efficiency as a starting point, examines school district‐based administrative practices that offered viable alternatives to the business‐oriented, “scientific management” reforms that tended to dominate much of the educational dialogue and innovation of the early twentieth century. Offers cases studies of three superintendents who creatively resisted the ideology of efficiency or who skillfully utilized administrative structures to buttress instructional reforms. Using archival records and other historical sources, first examines Superintendent A.C. Barker in Oakland, California between 1913 and 1918 and Superintendent Charles Chadsey in Denver, Colorado during the years 1907‐1912. Then analyzes the tenure of Jesse Newlon during his superintendency in Denver from 1920 to 1927. Using the conception of “authentic leadership” and the frameworks of the ethics of care, critique, and professionalism, argues that these administrators demonstrated how leaders grounded in notions of scholarly skepticism, democratic engagement, and the compassionate care of children were sometimes able to avoid the excesses of the ideology of “efficiency”.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Heinz‐Dieter Meyer

This article briefly considers the changes in organizational thinking about schools and colleges as formal organizations over the past 40 years. While there are signs for…

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This article briefly considers the changes in organizational thinking about schools and colleges as formal organizations over the past 40 years. While there are signs for a “paradigm” shift away from earlier conceptions of “loosely coupled” organizations and even of a growing indifference of organization scholars to the particular problems of managing and organizing education, there are also indications that our ability to organize schools and universities effectively and efficiently is becoming rapidly more important in an increasingly knowledge‐dependent society.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article

Bill Ralston

The purpose of this article is to review the surveys and comments made with respect to ZBB applications in academic institutions. In addition, the results of the writer's…

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The purpose of this article is to review the surveys and comments made with respect to ZBB applications in academic institutions. In addition, the results of the writer's masters dissertation on “The use and usefulness of ZBB in Academic Institutions” are summarised here. However, the detailed results of the Mail Questionnaire are included in the next article of the series.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article

DONALD J. WILLOWER

In this paper, which was presented at the second Inter‐American Congress on Educational Administration, held July 29‐August 2, 1984 in Brasilia, DF, Brazil, the author…

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In this paper, which was presented at the second Inter‐American Congress on Educational Administration, held July 29‐August 2, 1984 in Brasilia, DF, Brazil, the author sketches criteria for a philosophy that could contribute to advancement in educational administration. He then examines some positions and issues in the light of the criteria.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Moira Hulme

This chapter examines the inauguration of the university study of Education in Scotland and its relation to teacher education in the late nineteenth and early twentieth…

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This chapter examines the inauguration of the university study of Education in Scotland and its relation to teacher education in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The chapter outlines moves to establish Education as a disciplinary field in higher education and the junctures at which this movement aligns with and is in tension with concurrent moves to advance teaching as a profession. Academisation and professionalisation are the twin poles of this debate. This is not a parochial or obsolete debate. The place of teacher preparation in higher education has been the focus of sustained discussion across Anglophone nations. Three examples – the inauguration of chairs and lectureships, the governance of teacher education and deliberation on the content and purpose of a degree in Education – are used to help explain the apparent paradox between the historic place of education in Scottish culture and identity and the relatively recent full involvement of Scotland's universities in the professional preparation of teachers. Investigating the activities of the first academic community of educationists in Scotland may help to understand continuing struggles over jurisdiction and authority in this contested and yet neglected field.

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Teacher Preparation in Scotland
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-480-4

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Article

GLASGOW was later by about one hundred and thirty years than some of the Scotch towns in establishing a printing press. Three hundred years ago, though Glasgow contained a…

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GLASGOW was later by about one hundred and thirty years than some of the Scotch towns in establishing a printing press. Three hundred years ago, though Glasgow contained a University with men of great literary activity, including amongst others Zachary Boyd, there does not appear to have been sufficient printing work to induce anyone to establish a printing press. St. Andrews and Aberdeen were both notable for the books they produced, before Glasgow even attempted any printing.

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New Library World, vol. 12 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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WE offer our readers again our best wishes for the joy that appropriately belongs to Christmas. The happy festival comes at the close of one of the most fruitful and…

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WE offer our readers again our best wishes for the joy that appropriately belongs to Christmas. The happy festival comes at the close of one of the most fruitful and useful years in library history: a year which has seen wide developments—not, indeed, in the establishment of new libraries, though these have not been wanting (the last month of the year, for example, has seen Lord Elgin open the new library at Hendon), but in a drawing together of existing organizations, the creation of a really new Library Association, and a degree of co‐operation which thirty years ago would have seemed difficult.

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New Library World, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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