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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Keston Lindsay, Michelle Ferrer, Ronald Davis and David Nichols

Advances in military medical care have facilitated a reduction of fatalities in the global war on terror, relative to previous conflicts. The physical and psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

Advances in military medical care have facilitated a reduction of fatalities in the global war on terror, relative to previous conflicts. The physical and psychological trauma of returning personnel remain a challenge, and poor physical and psychological health have been shown to affect quality of life (QOL). The purpose of this paper is to validate the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire amongst wounded, injured and ill military personnel, and to determine the characteristics of distinct groups found in this sample.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 52 male and female military personnel (34.69+7.63 years, n=51) completed 24 items of the WHOQOL-BREF. Principal component analysis using the direct oblimin rotation was used to determine the factor structure of the WHOQOL-BREF and k-means cluster analysis was used to determine QOL characteristics of the separate groups.

Findings

The WHOQOL-BREF is a reliable tool for measuring QOL for American military personnel. However, the psychometric structure of the WHOQOL-BREF in this sample differed from the original domains. The first cluster analysis based on the original domains produced two clusters: a group of 12 that had poor QOL, and a group of 40 that had relatively good QOL except for the physical domain. The second cluster analysis differed in independence and access/social support only.

Research limitations/implications

Although the sample was small for principal component analysis, the investigators chose to proceed with this procedure, because objective indicators such as measures of sampling adequacy and communalities met or exceeded acceptable thresholds.

Originality/value

Rehabilitation programs for military ill, injured and wounded should contain components that promote independence and self-actualization.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Andrew Collins and Alison McCamley

The purpose of this paper is to compare quality of life scores in a long-term recovery population group (post five years) with a general population group and to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare quality of life scores in a long-term recovery population group (post five years) with a general population group and to explore how any differences might be explained by recovering individuals themselves in a small number of follow up qualitative interviews.

Design/methodology/approach

A sequential explanatory mixed method design combining quantitative quality of life measure (WHOQOL-BREF, 1996) and six subsequent semi-structured individual interviews. The quality of life measure compared long-term recovery scores (post five years) with the general population group. The subsequent qualitative semi-structured interviews explored what the participants themselves said about their recovery.

Findings

The quantitative data provide evidence of a significant difference in quality of life (WHOQoL-BREF) in two domains. The long-term recovery group (five or more years into recovery) scored higher in both the environment and psychological domains than the general population group. Of the long-term recovery group, 17 people who still accessed mutual aid scored higher in all four domains than those 23 people who did not. The interviews provide evidence of the this difference as result of growth in psychological elements of recovery, such as developing perspective, improvement in self-esteem, spirituality, as well as contributing as part of wider social involvement.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides support for the quality of life measure as useful in recovery research. The empirical data support the concept of recovery involving improvements in many areas of life and potentially beyond the norm, termed “better than well” (Best and Lubman, 2012; Valentine, 2011; Hibbert and Best, 2011). Limitations: snowballing method of recruitment, and undertaken by public health practitioner. Some suggestions of women and those who attend mutual aid having higher quality of life but sample too small.

Practical implications

Use QoL measure more in recovery research. Public health practitioners and policy makers need to work with partners and agencies to ensure that there is much more work, not just treatment focused, addressing the wider social and environmental context to support individuals recovering from alcohol and drugs over the longer term.

Originality/value

One of small number of studies using with participants who have experienced long-term (post five years) recovery, also use of quality of life measure (WHOQOL-BREF, 1996) with this population.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Tonderai Washington Shumba, Desderius Haufiku and Kabwebwe Honoré Mitonga

For the past four decades, there is no evidence of a consensus on the suitable community-based rehabilitation (CBR) evaluation methodologies. To this end, the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

For the past four decades, there is no evidence of a consensus on the suitable community-based rehabilitation (CBR) evaluation methodologies. To this end, the purpose of this study is to provide a narrative review on CBR evaluations and the potential of photovoice method when used alone and when used in combination with quality of life assessment tools as CBR evaluation methodologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative review was undertaken, but including some aspects of scoping review methodology.

Findings

Thirty-three full-text articles were included for review. Three key findings were an overview of the evolution of CBR evaluation; the use of photovoice method in CBR evaluation and the use of photovoice method in combination with quality of life assessment tools in CBR evaluation.

Research limitations/implications

Photovoice methodology was found to be participatory in nature and as has the potential to elicit the experiences of persons with disabilities. However, photovoice falls short of measuring the quality of life of persons with disabilities, thus will need to be collaborated with another assessment tool. A combination of photovoice and World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF and WHOQOL-Dis assessment has a potential to give an adequate representation of the voices of persons with disabilities and their quality of life.

Originality/value

There is need for changes in CBR evaluation methodologies in response to the evolution of disability models from medical model to human rights model. Thus CBR evaluation methodologies should embrace the diversity among persons with disabilities in interpreting life experiences and quality of life.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2020

Sarah Long, Kenneth Laidlaw, Angus Lorimer and Nuno Ferreira

Although quality of life and attitudes to ageing have been explored in the context of mental and physical health problems in older adults, the interplay between these…

Abstract

Purpose

Although quality of life and attitudes to ageing have been explored in the context of mental and physical health problems in older adults, the interplay between these variables has received little attention. The purpose of this study is to explore how attitudes to ageing relate to and predict quality of life in an international sample of older people those of age 57 to 79 (youngest-old) and those over 80 years old (oldest-old).

Design/methodology/approach

A large international sample (n = 4,616) of participants recruited from 20 different countries completed a set of measures assessing several demographic variables, attitudes to ageing, older adult specific quality of life, general quality of life and depression.

Findings

Correlational and regression analysis showed that more positive attitudes to ageing were associated with and predicted better quality of life in older adults beyond demographic and depression variables. Those in the oldest-old group had significantly more negative attitudes to ageing and a poorer quality of life. However, positive attitudes to ageing remained a significant predictor of better quality of life in both the youngest-old and oldest-old age groups.

Originality/value

Attitudes to ageing play an important part in quality of life in older adults; however, the impact of these attitudes might be different according to age group. These results suggest that attitudes to ageing could be a possible clinical target in interventions aiming at improving quality of life in older adults.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Ferry Efendi, Retno Indarwati and Gading Ekapuja Aurizki

This study aimed to analyze the effect of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy (TF-CBT) on the depression level and quality of life of the elderly in an…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to analyze the effect of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy (TF-CBT) on the depression level and quality of life of the elderly in an earthquake-affected district of North Lombok Regency, Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

A Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) with a population of two elderly groups living in an earthquake-affected district was used in this study. The intervention comprised giving TF-CBT. There were three research instruments applied to determine the variables, namely, the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS-5), the Geriatric Depression Scale 15 (GDS 15) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF). All instruments were adopted and translated using back translation to Bahasa Indonesia, which is appropriate at the suggestion of the WHO. To investigate the effect of the intervention, we used hierarchical linear models (HLM) with intent-to-treat analysis. The patent parameter effect was tested using the Wald test (t-test) with a confidence Interval of 95 per cent.

Findings

The final analysis applied CAPS-5 and showed that there was a decrease in the PTSD of the respondents, which was down to only 8 (17.8 per cent) in the post-test. The same situation happened for the depression variable (2.8 per cent) after it was assessed using GDS-15C. The Quality of life (WHOQoL-BREF) variable was divided into Physical (50.7), Psychological (57.1), Social (53.6) and Environmental (45.7). These components show there to be a significant result in terms of improving the quality of life of the elderly victims of the earthquake. The finding highlights that applying TF-CBT in the elderly population can significantly drop post-traumatic stress disorder and depression level and enhanced quality of life.

Social implications

The intervention decreased the depression level and improved the quality of life of the elderly as found in the six- week follow-up. Longer training and integration with the structured local wisdom could be necessary to better address the mental health of the elderly affected by the earthquake. Moreover, strengthening the role of the family as the primary caregiver is required to improve the outcome.

Originality/value

This is the first study that has attempted to use TF-CBT as a method of treatment for the elderly to decrease their depression and to increase quality of life among the Indonesian elderly who have experienced an earthquake. This paper provides knowledge on the effectiveness of TF-CBT that can be used by therapists to treat depression problems suffered by the elderly in a post-disaster area.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

Nicolas Combalbert, Valérie Pennequin, Claude Ferrand, Moussa Keita and Brigitte Geffray

The purpose of this paper is to assess the level of perceived health and quality of life of elderly prisoners in France, and to see whether there is a link between aging…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the level of perceived health and quality of life of elderly prisoners in France, and to see whether there is a link between aging, time spent in prison and level of education and scores for perceived health and quality of life.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors’ recruited 138 male prisoners aged 50 and over in seven French prisons. The research protocol comprised a semi-structured interview and two scales.

Findings

The results revealed low levels of perceived health and quality of life among the elderly inmates. They also showed that age was not statistically associated with most of the dimensions of perceived health on the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), with the exception of poor mobility. By contrast, age was statistically associated with most of the dimensions of quality of life on the WHOQOL-Bref. Time spent in prison was only associated negatively with the “sleep” dimension of the NHP. Emotional reactions were perceived most positively by the inmates with the highest level of education.

Practical implications

It seems particularly important to assess the perceived health and quality of life of elderly prisoners in order to ensure their appropriate treatment and management.

Originality/value

Very few studies have examined the perceived health and quality of life of prisoners, even though this population is particularly vulnerable in terms of physical and mental health.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2021

David Kalema, Lore Van Damme, Sofie Vindevogel, Ilse Derluyn, Peter Baguma and Wouter Vanderplasschen

Given the scarce literature on alcohol use disorders (AUD) and their treatment in developing countries, this paper aims to explore motivation levels and their correlates…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the scarce literature on alcohol use disorders (AUD) and their treatment in developing countries, this paper aims to explore motivation levels and their correlates among alcohol service users in two residential treatment centres in Kampala, Uganda. This study how motivation levels of Ugandan alcohol service users compare with those from American studies; and the specific factors affecting internal and external motivation in the Ugandan context.

Design/methodology/approach

The motivation for treatment was measured among 100 individuals entering AUD treatment using the Texas Christian University (TCU) Treatment needs and Motivation scale. The WHOQoL–BREF, Addiction Severity Index–6 and Hopkins Symptoms Check List–37 were used to measure addiction severity, quality of life (QoL) and psychopathology, respectively. Correlates of motivation were identified using linear regression analyses.

Findings

Ugandan service users demonstrated low treatment motivation in the treatment needs a domain. While addiction severity (recent heavy alcohol use) and participating in private treatment were associated with higher internal and external motivation, deterioration in physical and environmental QoL, depressive symptoms and lower education were linked with higher internal motivation.

Research limitations/implications

Different elements affect domains of treatment motivation, requiring attention for clients’ unique needs as influenced by their background, addiction severity, QoL, psychological needs and contextual factors (e.g. treatment setting). Further studies are needed to explore additional correlates of motivation for treatment among alcohol service users in Uganda and to assess the longitudinal impact of motivation on treatment outcomes.

Originality/value

Although motivation has been extensively studied, clinicians are challenged in understanding and explaining motivational dynamics given the multiplicity of factors influencing change-related decisions and behaviours and the diversity in substance-using populations. This need is even bigger in non-Western societies as cultural differences may require differential therapeutic management. This is one of the first studies measuring motivation for AUD treatment in a low-income country and offers insight for understanding motivation dynamics in similar settings.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Laetitia Livesey, Ian Morrison, Stephen Clift and Paul Camic

The aim of this study is to explore the benefits of choral singing for mental wellbeing and health as perceived by a cross‐national sample of amateur choral singers.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to explore the benefits of choral singing for mental wellbeing and health as perceived by a cross‐national sample of amateur choral singers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data consisted of written responses to open‐ended questions. These were derived from 169 participants selected from a larger dataset reporting high and low levels of emotional wellbeing on the WHOQOL‐BREF questionnaire. A majority of participants were female and aged over 50. A thematic analysis was followed by a content analysis and Pearson chi square analyses. Comparisons were made between different ages, genders and nationalities and participants with high and low reported emotional wellbeing.

Findings

The analysis revealed multiple themes covering perceived benefits in social, emotional, physical, and cognitive domains. There were no significant differences in frequency of themes across any of the participant sociodemographic and wellbeing categories. The results indicate that benefits of singing may be experienced similarly irrespective of age, gender, nationality or wellbeing status.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for further research include future use of validated instruments to measure outcomes and research into the benefits of singing in other cultures. The results of this study suggest that choral singing could be used to promote mental health and treat mental illness.

Originality/value

This study examines a cross‐national sample which is larger than previous studies in this area. These findings contribute to understanding of the complex and interacting factors which might contribute to wellbeing and health, as well as specific benefits of singing.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1970

Kwanrutai Sampoon, Nuengruethai Posri and Boonsri Kittichotpanich

The purpose of this paper is to test the effectiveness of social dance exercise and social support program to improve quality of life (QOL) for older adults in Thailand.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the effectiveness of social dance exercise and social support program to improve quality of life (QOL) for older adults in Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

A quasi-experimental pre-test and post-test research design was used. The participants were 102 older adults selected by systematic sampling technique. Participants were assigned using the matched-pair technique by age, physical fitness test by the Time up and Go test into intervention and control groups of 51 subjects each. Intervention was conducted for 12 weeks, three times weekly, to improve physical, psychosocial and spiritual domains leading to enhanced QOL as measured by the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL–BREF–THAI) assessment parameter. Data on QOL were collected before and after a 12-week training period.

Findings

Most adults were between 70 and 79 years old (67 percent). After program completion, before and after mean QOL scores for the intervention group at 60.15 and 95.82, respectively, were statistically significant with p-value<0.05. Post-program QOL shown by the intervention group was significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05).

Originality/value

Application of social dance exercise and social support program is an alternative to traditional methods to improve QOL and maintain functional capacity for older adults.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2586-940X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Gokcen Garipoglu, Nesli Ersoy, Mustafa Gülşen and Taner Özgürtaş

Lactose intolerance is lactose digestive disorder due to lactase enzyme deficiency. This can affect the quality of life by restricting the intake of certain foods. The aim…

Abstract

Purpose

Lactose intolerance is lactose digestive disorder due to lactase enzyme deficiency. This can affect the quality of life by restricting the intake of certain foods. The aim of this study is to show the lactose intolerance to the restriction in food intake and quality of life.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted with adults aged 18–60 years. A survey was used to gather information on the demographic characteristics of the patients and their symptoms related to lactose intolerance. In addition, the Visual Analog Scale was administered to identify common symptoms and the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-Bref Quality of Life Scale to determine their quality of life.

Findings

The average quality of life subscale scores was 56.25 ± 14.06 for physical, 58.29 ± 11.72 for mental, 63.28 ± 21.35 for social and 62.36 ± 16.37 for environmental. When VAS scores obtained for the common digestive system symptoms in lactose intolerance were compared with Quality of Life scores; it was found that physical life quality scores decreased (r = −0.239, p = 0.030) as the complaints of diarrhea increased and physical and environmental life quality decreased (r = −0.316, p = 0.004/r = −0.277, p = 0.012, respectively) as abdominal pain increased.

Originality/value

People reduce dairy consumption due to digestive system complaints. Therefore, it is important to inform the people about the effects of lactose intolerance because discomfort caused by intolerance can affect nutrient intake and lower the quality of life.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

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