Search results

1 – 10 of 348
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Adelina Broadbridge

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the gender composition of retail management and various issues in the careers of women managers during the last 25 years, a time…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the gender composition of retail management and various issues in the careers of women managers during the last 25 years, a time period that has been transformational in many ways for UK retailing.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on empirical research from the last 25 years.

Findings

Findings indicate that progress of women in retail management positions has been slow and they are still under‐represented at senior levels of UK companies. Barriers to women's ascension to senior management positions persist, and can be broadly related to the traditional division of labour, and organisational cultural norms and values which uphold deep‐rooted stereotypes and promote intransigent modes of working.

Practical implications

The gendered assumption of the male model and male leader as the ideal retail manager needs to be challenged further, and embedded cultural norms and outdated attitudes towards women in retail organisations require to be further challenged. Informal and implicit organisational practices and patterns of behaviour need to change so as to be inclusive of all workers not just men.

Originality/value

The paper highlights issues that continue to be problematic for women in the retail management hierarchy.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Christopher Pass

The Article seeks to identify the configuration of executive directors conditional option and LTIP arrangements used to align the interest of the company’s directors and…

Abstract

Purpose

The Article seeks to identify the configuration of executive directors conditional option and LTIP arrangements used to align the interest of the company’s directors and shareholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The article presents an empirical study of the option and LTIP arrangements (current and previous) of 51 major UK companies. The article focuses on the configuration of option schemes and LTIPs in respect of three critical elements: the performance target selected, the comparator used to benchmark performance and the quantitative performance target level requirement to be achieved to trigger rewards. The period 1989‐2002, covered by the research indicates a substantial degree of “experimentation” with many companies amending their original option schemes and LTIPs and a larger number of other companies introducing new arrangements. A substantial number of schemes can be characterised as being “undemanding” rewarding average rather than excellent performance.

Research limitations/implications

It is It is proposed (in a follow up paper) to econometrically test for associations between particular configurations (identified in this article) and actual corporate financial performance, i.e. which configurations have the most robust impact on performance.

Practical implications

The author makes a number of recommendations aimed at making option schemes and LTIP, more “stretching”, rewarding only excellent rather than average performance.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to explicitly look at the components of option schemes and LTIPs in a detailed way, questioning the merits/demerits of the targets and comparators commonly used to evaluate performance.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1977

The boom in retail sales forecast for the current year has definitely failed to materialise. In the first three quarters in 1976 the volume of sales was down by 3% on the…

Abstract

The boom in retail sales forecast for the current year has definitely failed to materialise. In the first three quarters in 1976 the volume of sales was down by 3% on the level of a year ago, and some areas, such as food retailing, where sales could end the year down 4 or more percentage points, have been major casualties of the squeeze on consumers' real incomes. Although the Government's pay norm of 10% started life as a fairly wishy washy attempt to restrain wage inflation, a tough line has been maintained on what is still a non‐statutory and voluntary agreement. There is every chance, now that the power workers have been routed, that the 10%guideline may stick for large sections of the working population. Where, then, is the rise in retail sales going to come from next year? The evidence is that the consuming population has reacted to wage restraint by simply cutting down. This is particularly noticeable in the food sector, where volume has sustained a heavy fall, where there has been much trading down, and where Tesco appears to have made the right move in ditching Green Shield for lower store prices. Clothing and footwear sales have not been good; a non‐summer this year clearly did not help, although the promised hard winter after several years of mild weather might help sales this time around. Sales of durable goods have been poor, and this is hardly surprising in a situation in which consumers, far from contemplating major capital investments in washing machines and carpets or furniture, are arguing over which brand of baked beans is the cheapest. So this is altogether a rather gloomy picture —but relief is at hand in the form of the latest round of tax allowance uplifts that should (the Inland Revenue willing) hit pay packets and the shops in time for Christmas. This means that retailers who rely on Xmas sales for a good proportion of their profits (department stores, Boots, WH Smith) will be making merry this year. But one theory is that the extra cash will be used to buy smaller items — extra drink, food and presents, rather than for fuelling any increase in larger items of expenditure. Latest monthly figures from the Department of Trade show that retail sales for both September and October were below the levels for 1976. In September the volume index was down from 108.9 to 106.2 while in October it fell from 108 to 106. The savings ratio —the best barometer outlook remains at an all time high. This is where the consumer boom next year will come from. The only question is —will consumers be that much more confident after the turn of the year? Over the last few months the strength of sterling and the appro‐val of the UK's international creditors has helped to boost confidence —and led to the government talking out loud in terms of ‘turning the corner’. There must be a huge pent up demand for consumer items. It is possible to envisage a consumer boom from next summer despite the 10%wage restraint. If people were confident enough in the future of the economy, they would start spending their savings instead of stuffing them into the building societies. Obviously the current high level of unemployment is not good psychologically for such a boom. On the other hand, lower factory gate prices (and smaller increases in imported food prices following the strength of sterling) may lead to something close to a real increase in disposable income even on the basis of a 10% norm wage rise. Some areas that are sensitive to future spending trends, or rather to consumers' feelings about those trends, such as mail order, are doing quite well at present.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Gareth English

Following a number of management team changes, WH Smith Travel wanted to establish how its employees viewed the company’s organizational culture. Here, Gareth English…

Abstract

Following a number of management team changes, WH Smith Travel wanted to establish how its employees viewed the company’s organizational culture. Here, Gareth English, senior consultant with business psychology experts, OPP, explains how conducting workforce surveys helped to gauge the impact of the changes, identify areas for improvement and encourage employee engagement.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1983

Sue Sharpies

1983 heralds the third year of W H Smith's bar‐code wanding trial at Commercial Road, Portsmouth. RDM spoke to overall controller of the project, John Read, at the…

Abstract

1983 heralds the third year of W H Smith's bar‐code wanding trial at Commercial Road, Portsmouth. RDM spoke to overall controller of the project, John Read, at the company's Swindon centre, and visited the pilot store to find out how the new system was progressing.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1976

Hambleden Press — a division of WH Smith — is using a planning and policy‐making technique which relies on the full participation of staff, without the necessity for…

Abstract

Hambleden Press — a division of WH Smith — is using a planning and policy‐making technique which relies on the full participation of staff, without the necessity for worker directors and two‐tier boards. And, according to a Smith's executive, the system has improved profits and management efficiency. Report by Paula Hann.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 76 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1977

Recent results from the retail sector show that sales and pre‐tax profits of leading stores performed well in the second half of the 1976–77 financial year. Among the…

Abstract

Recent results from the retail sector show that sales and pre‐tax profits of leading stores performed well in the second half of the 1976–77 financial year. Among the multiples, British Home Stores reported sales up by 14 and profits up by 15%. Among the mail orders, both Freemans and Empire Stores did well with profit gains of 28 and 42% respectively, while Mothercare and WH Smith also showed significant gains. There appears to have been some volume growth, particularly with groups such as Mothercare, which has had enormous success with expanding its range of merchandise, but the main boost to profits has come from the relaxation of the Prices Code and some recovery in retail margins. But what will happen this year? The scenario is still rather gloomy. Department of Trade figures for March show a drop in non‐food retail spending of nearly 1% in real terms as against the same month a year ago. And the current trend appears to be downwards, with March registering a drop of 3.6% from February 1977 levels. Durables have been particularly badly hit, showing a decline of 7½% on the same basis, but the ‘replacement cycle’ appears to be having some beneficial impact on the clothing trade. For the present, with inflation in food and other goods still far from modest, despite very recent suggestions of a slowdown in the wholesale goods index, there is little hope of much recovery. Tax rebates promised by the Chancellor are pretty much a drop in the ocean as far as a summer pick‐up in spending goes. But Phase Three wage restraint agreements promise to have more agreement than restraint about them, so the relative decline in disposable income could come to an end in the early part of 1978. But, again, a large rise in wages will immediately take its toll of retail margins. But as the time draws near for another election one might anticipate the government, worried as it is, to attempt to douse the feelings of discontent on the wages front with something resembling a consumer boom.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Montague Lewis

A great deal has been written and talked about lately on the application of market research techniques to the retail format. In its most obvious manifestations it has…

Abstract

A great deal has been written and talked about lately on the application of market research techniques to the retail format. In its most obvious manifestations it has formed the basis for such successful operations as Next and the Burton Group and the recent diversifications in WH Smith. But the potential applications of market research are not confined to niche or multi‐strategy marketing. Intelligent advertising research can be a useful tool, as is customer analysis. What makes customers choose a particular store — or a particular brand? Is there a relationship between the two? And how do you build up appeal and customer loyalty through advertising and sales promotion? These were the main points covered at a recent seminar organised by Wallace International to mark the occasion of the opening of their new headquarters in London. Three speakers discussed aspects of innovation relating to the current scene in retailing — Montague Lewis, of the College for the Distributive Trades (who also wrote this feature); Dr Mark Uncles, from the London Business School, and Mike Elms, of Ogilvie Mather.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2003

Dawn Cordy

Demonstrates the popularity of children’s magazines in the UK, and the power of licensed characters for children up to seven years old; magazines aid in children’s…

Abstract

Demonstrates the popularity of children’s magazines in the UK, and the power of licensed characters for children up to seven years old; magazines aid in children’s self‐development, they are an alternative to sweets and TV as a treat, they have a variety of content, and they give parents and children quality time together. Outlines the size of this highly competitive market, and its segments of preschool, comics (mainly aimed at boys), and girls, their retail profile, and market trends. Moves on to how these magazines fit into parents’ and children’s worlds, including case studies of four major licences: Disney, Barbie, Thomas the Tank Engine, and Clifford. Explains why these licences are so successful, and suggests how brands can use them to communicate with children and parents, through suitable advertisements, competitions and promotions.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Vincent Desmond

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate ways in which innovative thinking can bring about radical change to organisations. It aims to identify some of the many

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate ways in which innovative thinking can bring about radical change to organisations. It aims to identify some of the many creative ways this innovative thought can be liberated from staff members using quality processes, and argue that a structured, quality approach to engaging staff in improvement and innovation can bring about this radical change.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper consists of a combination of case study based material and includes the author's opinion and interpretation. The integral focus is on encouraging innovation from within, implementing ways to involve staff members and introducing structured, gradual, change. The paper uses examples of organisations across varied industries to showcase how they have accomplished this task.

Findings

Developing collaborative environments and encouraging employee contribution to facilitate innovative thinking can liberate not only employees but the whole organisation. The case study organisations featured have found that introducing new methods of innovation can provide a manageable process, which over time can result in significant change.

Originality/value

This paper sets out the systematic approach organisations should follow to unlock the creative power of their employees, develop fast and stay ahead of the competition. It argues that in the current economic climate, organisations will need to make these radical improvements in order to survive and prosper.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

1 – 10 of 348