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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1991

W.S.P. Fortuyn

Decentralisation spreads over Europe. It started approximately a decennium ago with the election of Mrs Margaret Thatcher as Prime Minister of Britain. She initiated a…

Abstract

Decentralisation spreads over Europe. It started approximately a decennium ago with the election of Mrs Margaret Thatcher as Prime Minister of Britain. She initiated a large number of privatisations and decentralisations of governmental responsibilities given the enormous federal deficit and the poor condition of the British economy. At the same time, the end of the 70s, the beginning of the 80s, the Dutch faced similar problems: an excessively large governmental deficit, an increasing number of civil servants, high unemployment rates, an overstretched social security system and a somewhat unstable economy. By the mid 80s a worldwide economic boom ensued, during which the Dutch economy was growing at average rates of 2–3 percent a year, reducing the urge in the Netherlands to make structural choices. The system itself was not changed.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 14 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Jaap A. Hoogenboezem and Dirk B. Hoogenboezem

The article aims to understand why performance management schemes or targeting were introduced in the Dutch police organisation after 2002. This question is relevant for…

Abstract

Purpose

The article aims to understand why performance management schemes or targeting were introduced in the Dutch police organisation after 2002. This question is relevant for two reasons. First, Dutch political culture is traditionally not overly concerned with performance of public organisations, and second, police work seems especially averse to targeting.

Design/methodology/approach

The article explores changes in Dutch politics, and especially the rise and agenda of Pim Fortuyn, a flamboyant politician who disrupted the traditional political relations in the Dutch polity, and who put government performance on top of the political agenda. Analysis of secondary sources is used to track the response of police management, and field work is used to investigate the reactions of street level police officers.

Findings

The introduction of targeting is directly attributable to changes in the polity. As such, they represent a pendulum swing that will move back, especially when the limitations of targeting will become clear, and when the political discourse has moved on to topics other than public accountability.

Practical implications

Managers of public organisations could learn from this case that political pressure can have far‐reaching consequences, which cannot always be ignored, and can lead to far‐reaching effects in the organisation, that may be counterproductive.

Originality/value

This article asks simple questions: Why are Dutch police forces using performance contracts involving targets negotiated between the department of home affairs, the mayor and the police chief? Why were they introduced from 2002 on? And will they be a lasting practice in the Dutch police?

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 54 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Niels Martijn Kraaier

In 2001, Dutch politician Jacques Wallage introduced the concept of “communication in the heart of policy”, which sought to bridge the perceived gap between the government…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2001, Dutch politician Jacques Wallage introduced the concept of “communication in the heart of policy”, which sought to bridge the perceived gap between the government and the populace. He also advocated for a stronger focus on the proper representation of cabinet ministers in the mass media. The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications experienced by communication professionals in the Dutch public service in terms of integrating this approach.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a series of 17 qualitative semi-structured interviews held with communication professionals either previously or currently employed in the Dutch public service.

Findings

The findings show that it has become increasingly difficult for communication professionals in the Dutch public service to maintain the strict separation between government communication and political communication that once characterised their work.

Research limitations/implications

The focus of this paper is on government communication in the Netherlands at a national level.

Practical implications

This paper argues that a stronger focus on the image and reputation of cabinet members blurs the line between government communication and political communication, which may defeat the purpose of “communication in the heart of policy”.

Originality/value

This paper offers a unique insight into government communication practices in a consociational state, where politics are marked by negotiation and a common striving for broad consensus, and where the public service is controlled by coalition governments rather than one particular party.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Dilip Das, Leo Huberts and Ronald van Steden

The purpose of this paper is to address the changing organization and culture of the Dutch police over the last decade.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the changing organization and culture of the Dutch police over the last decade.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on personal observation, desk research and a survey among the police and administrative elite in The Netherlands, the paper describes, analyzes and reflects upon developments which are out of tune with the Dutch tradition.

Findings

From the 1960s onwards, The Netherlands was famous for her pragmatic, decentralized and friendly style of community policing. The slogan “the police are your best friend” summarizes the “essence” or the “soul” of Dutch policing. Increasingly, however, the typically tolerant, friendly and social policing style has come under pressure. The system of relatively independent regional police departments has been fiercely criticized because of the lack of effectiveness and efficiency in solving crime, safety and security challenges. National government now wants a much bigger say in setting its police programs and priorities. Moreover, as elite government officials stipulate, the police must be more “tough” on crime and terrorism. This attitude has led to centralization, penalization and, at the local level, responsibilization, which signifies that a variety of private, (often profit‐seeking) policing agencies and companies are made responsible for public order maintenance. Such changes are leading toward a “state‐centered” police model at some distance from citizens, a development that is seen as contrary to the social soul of Dutch policing.

Originality/value

The paper offers an analysis into the changing “soul” of Dutch policings.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Piet Verhoeven

This paper aims at providing a theoretical perspective to study the effects of the communication management/public relations of organizations on the social cohesion of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at providing a theoretical perspective to study the effects of the communication management/public relations of organizations on the social cohesion of individuals, groups and societies.

Design/methodology/approach

The possible connections between communication management and social cohesion, social integration and diversity are explored by looking at the concept of social capital. After discussing aspects of the hypothesis of decreasing social capital and of the hypothesis of increasing contingency of Western societies, questions are raised about the societal role of communication management as a profession that is usually described as being concerned with building relations. To study questions like these empirically, the actor network theory (ANT) is suggested as an analytical perspective and a methodological approach to elaborate the position of reflective communication management.

Findings

ANT or the sociology of associations seems a suitable theoretical perspective for studying the relations between communication management, social capital and social cohesion. ANT sheds a light on fact and meaning construction, on issues of power and framing and on coalition building activities and translation: who is bridging or bonding with whom and with what consequences?

Originality/value

Research from the perspective of ANT could result in a comprehensive understanding of communication management/public relations incorporating functionalistic, social psychological, relationship and rhetorical approaches.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Abstract

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Funerary Practices in the Netherlands
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-876-5

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Book part
Publication date: 29 May 2018

Leila Kian and Halleh Ghorashi

Purpose – With political tensions surrounding migrants in post-9/11 Western societies, scholarship on second-generation immigrants has surged. This study explores the…

Abstract

Purpose – With political tensions surrounding migrants in post-9/11 Western societies, scholarship on second-generation immigrants has surged. This study explores the narratives of second-generation Iranian-Dutch women, a previously unstudied group, in relation to their positionality regarding identity and belonging.

Methodology/Approach – By combining focus group discussions with in-depth individual interviews, we explored the narratives of 13 second-generation Iranian-Dutch women. Our focus was on their senses of belonging, cultural identities and lived experiences as they navigated between Dutch society and their parents’ complicated heritage, against the backdrop of the post-9/11 world.

Findings – Although these women are perfectly ‘integrated’, they are still frequently approached and labelled as ‘foreigners’ in society, which negatively impacts their sense of belonging in Dutch society. However, our participants navigated contradicting parental and societal expectations, finding new ways to belong and fashioning cultural identities in multiplicity.

Originality/Value of the Paper – To our knowledge, the specific experiences of second-generation Iranian-Dutch migrants have received no scholarly attention. Our findings further the understanding on relevant second-generation themes such as the immigrant bargain, solidarity between different ethnic minority groups, and new ways of belonging.

Details

Contested Belonging: Spaces, Practices, Biographies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-206-2

Keywords

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Abstract

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International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2017

Wouter van Atteveldt, Christine Moser and Kasper Welbers

Organizations from the same industry or field often tend to become more similar over time, despite being different in terms of for example strategies, goals, or…

Abstract

Organizations from the same industry or field often tend to become more similar over time, despite being different in terms of for example strategies, goals, or performance. However, recently scholars pointed out that organizational fields are dynamic entities with permeable boundaries, thus indicating that prior literature may have oversimplified the phenomenon. Indeed, in this paper we draw attention to an organizational field that centers on text, and revolves around shared (or debated) meaning stemming from that text. The guiding research question is, “To what extent do organizations converge or diverge from meaning embedded in interconnected text?” We investigate party manifestos and press releases of organizations from the field of politics, focusing on the topic of immigration. We extract meaning from these texts, using document scaling and similarity analysis. Our results show that while most parties become more similar in their framing of immigration, the anti-immigrant PVV actually radicalizes further and as a result takes an isolated position in the policy space. Thus, Dutch political organizations became similar (converge) as well as different (diverge) over time through interaction, in terms of their shared meaning systems. This paper substantiates findings of isomorphic tendencies of organizations within a shared organizational field. At the same time, we find that Dutch politics constitute an issue field, where parties compete about meanings and framings on controversial issues. Our analysis shows that meaning embedded in texts changes over time; this indicates that change mechanisms in organizational fields may be brought about through changes in meaning systems.

Details

Structure, Content and Meaning of Organizational Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-433-0

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Contested Belonging: Spaces, Practices, Biographies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-206-2

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