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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1941

W.P. Lear

The equipment described in the following article was installed in a German Messerschmidt 109 shot down over the Thames estuary. The aeroplane was shipped to the United…

Abstract

The equipment described in the following article was installed in a German Messerschmidt 109 shot down over the Thames estuary. The aeroplane was shipped to the United States through arrangements made by Mrs. Winston Churchill, honorary sponsor of “Bundles for Britain.” Upon its arrival Lear engineers removed the radio apparatus, and the equipment was thoroughly tested by Mr. Lear in his laboratories at Lear Avia, Inc., Piqua, Ohio. A covering note accompanying the article says: “Mr. Lear's report on the German radio equipment stressed four points: (1) The Germans have apparently ‘frozen’ their military radio design since 1933, and standardized their tubes and components for ease of mass production and servicing. (2) Shortages of war materials are indicated by the use of ceramics instead of plastics, fibre instead of rubber and special alloys instead of aluminium. (3) The extremely limited range of the transmitter (around 5 miles) and the provision for higher power output, indicate that most German warplancs in a given squadron can talk only to one another, while only the leader can communicate with his base. (4) German aircraft radio apparatus found in the Messerschmidt cannot pass U.S. Government lest for even commercial radio equipment, and weighs more than comparable American apparatus.”

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 13 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1954

B.R. Noton

EACH September the eyes of the aeronautical World turn towards the S.B.A.C. Air Display and Exhibition with interest unequalled by any other event. It is fitting that the…

Abstract

EACH September the eyes of the aeronautical World turn towards the S.B.A.C. Air Display and Exhibition with interest unequalled by any other event. It is fitting that the Display is now held each year at the airfield of the Royal Aircraft Establishment, one of the world's most prominent aeronautical research centres. This interest becomes increasingly keen too, as the preview day comes closer, because new prototypes of unorthodox designs often appear a short time before the Show to illustrate the results of years of careful planning, development and research of the particular company. These designs often mould the path of progress for smaller countries without the economic resources to forge the way ahead alone. Most British citizens are very proud of their country's place in aviation today, both in the military and civil fields. This is understood by most foreigners because it is clear that Britain has won a place in aeronautical development second to none.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1954

A brief comparison of tooling techniques in the automotive and aircraft industries. One problem arising where the same tooling shop is used lies in the difference between…

Abstract

A brief comparison of tooling techniques in the automotive and aircraft industries. One problem arising where the same tooling shop is used lies in the difference between the types of engineering drawings. The aircraft drawings are complicated by the fact that engineering changes are not included in the up‐to‐date working drawings.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1956

S.L. Bragg

THE second Combustion Colloquium organized by the A.G.A.R.D. (Advisory Group on Aeronautical Research and Development to the N.A.T.O. Countries) was held at the University…

Abstract

THE second Combustion Colloquium organized by the A.G.A.R.D. (Advisory Group on Aeronautical Research and Development to the N.A.T.O. Countries) was held at the University of Liege, in Belgium, on December 5–9 last, and was attended by about 200 delegates. The seventeen papers which were presented and discussed were grouped under the following headings, although their subject matter sometimes overlapped these boundaries:

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1957

This book contains the subject matter taught by the author at the École Nationale Supérieure de l'Aéronautique and at the École Nationale Supérieure des Mines in Paris. It…

Abstract

This book contains the subject matter taught by the author at the École Nationale Supérieure de l'Aéronautique and at the École Nationale Supérieure des Mines in Paris. It is thus not primarily intended for professional mathematicians, but a rigour worthy of them is maintained throughout. In particular, the ideas of mathematical analysis are freely used and the small quantity ∈ is frequently mentioned. The production of such a comprehensive work in the 916 pages is in itself a remarkable achievement, but in the reviewer's opinion very few British engineers, unless they have an unusually strong mathematical bent, will find that they can derive much profit from it.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Fredrik von Corswant

This paper deals with the organizing of interactive product development. Developing products in interaction between firms may provide benefits in terms of specialization…

Abstract

This paper deals with the organizing of interactive product development. Developing products in interaction between firms may provide benefits in terms of specialization, increased innovation, and possibilities to perform development activities in parallel. However, the differentiation of product development among a number of firms also implies that various dependencies need to be dealt with across firm boundaries. How dependencies may be dealt with across firms is related to how product development is organized. The purpose of the paper is to explore dependencies and how interactive product development may be organized with regard to these dependencies.

The analytical framework is based on the industrial network approach, and deals with the development of products in terms of adaptation and combination of heterogeneous resources. There are dependencies between resources, that is, they are embedded, implying that no resource can be developed in isolation. The characteristics of and dependencies related to four main categories of resources (products, production facilities, business units and business relationships) provide a basis for analyzing the organizing of interactive product development.

Three in-depth case studies are used to explore the organizing of interactive product development with regard to dependencies. The first two cases are based on the development of the electrical system and the seats for Volvo’s large car platform (P2), performed in interaction with Delphi and Lear respectively. The third case is based on the interaction between Scania and Dayco/DFC Tech for the development of various pipes and hoses for a new truck model.

The analysis is focused on what different dependencies the firms considered and dealt with, and how product development was organized with regard to these dependencies. It is concluded that there is a complex and dynamic pattern of dependencies that reaches far beyond the developed product as well as beyond individual business units. To deal with these dependencies, development may be organized in teams where several business units are represented. This enables interaction between different business units’ resource collections, which is important for resource adaptation as well as for innovation. The delimiting and relating functions of the team boundary are elaborated upon and it is argued that also teams may be regarded as actors. It is also concluded that a modular product structure may entail a modular organization with regard to the teams, though, interaction between business units and teams is needed. A strong connection between the technical structure and the organizational structure is identified and it is concluded that policies regarding the technical structure (e.g. concerning “carry-over”) cannot be separated from the management of the organizational structure (e.g. the supplier structure). The organizing of product development is in itself a complex and dynamic task that needs to be subject to interaction between business units.

Details

Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

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Book part
Publication date: 20 March 2018

Brian Parsons

Abstract

Details

The Evolution of the British Funeral Industry in the 20th Century: From Undertaker to Funeral Director
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-630-5

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Book part
Publication date: 20 March 2018

Brian Parsons

Abstract

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The Evolution of the British Funeral Industry in the 20th Century: From Undertaker to Funeral Director
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-630-5

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Jason P. Davis

This paper explores the emergence and coordination of synchrony in networked groups like those that develop integrated product platforms in collaborative ecosystems. While…

Abstract

This paper explores the emergence and coordination of synchrony in networked groups like those that develop integrated product platforms in collaborative ecosystems. While synchronized actions are an important objective for many groups, interorganizational network theory has yet to explore synchrony in depth perhaps because it does not fit the typical diffusion models this research relies upon. By adding organizationally realistic features – sparse network structure and intentional coordination – to the firefly model from theoretical biology, I take some first steps in understanding synchrony in organizational groups. Like diffusion, synchrony is more effective in denser networks, but unlike diffusion clustering decelerates synchrony’s emergence. Coordination by a few group members accelerates group-wide synchrony, and benefits the coordinating organizations with a higher likelihood that it converges to the coordinating organization’s preferred rhythm. This likelihood of convergence to an organization’s preferred rhythm – what I term synchrony performance – increases in denser networks, but is not dependent on tie strength and clustering.

Details

Collaboration and Competition in Business Ecosystems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-826-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1938

THIS is the month when librarians and library workers everywhere, their holidays over, turn to their winter plans. There are, however, some interesting events to take…

Abstract

THIS is the month when librarians and library workers everywhere, their holidays over, turn to their winter plans. There are, however, some interesting events to take place before the darker and more active months come. The first is the meeting at Oxford on September 21st and subsequent days of the Federation International de Documentation. This will be followed by and merge into the ASLIB Conference, and there is in prospect an attendance of over three hundred. Our readers know that this organization produces and advocates the International Decimal Classification. It is not primarily a “library” society but rather one of abstractors and indexers of material, but it is closely akin, and we hope that English librarianship will be well represented. Then there is a quite important joint‐conference at Lincoln of the Northern Branches of the Library Association on September 30th— October 3rd, which we see is to be opened by the President of the Library Association. Finally the London and Home Counties Branch are to confer at Folkestone from October 14th to 16th, and here, the programme includes Messrs. Jast, Savage, McColvin, Wilks, Carter, and the President will also attend. There are other meetings, and if the question is asked: do not librarians have too many meetings ? we suppose the answer to be that the Association is now so large that local conferences become desirable. One suggestion, that has frequently been made, we repeat. The Library Association should delegate a certain definite problem to each of its branches, asking for a report. These reports should form the basis of the Annual Conference. It is worthy of more consideration.

Details

New Library World, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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