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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1951

W.H. GLASSCOCK

In 1786 His Majesty's Stationery Office was formed as an administrative reform to stop the waste of public money that occurred when each Government Department made its own…

Abstract

In 1786 His Majesty's Stationery Office was formed as an administrative reform to stop the waste of public money that occurred when each Government Department made its own purchases of ink, paper and other requirements. In 1950 the Stationery Office is a supply service for all Government Departments for many things unheard of or unrecognizable as ‘stationery’ in the eighteenth century, e.g. calculating machines and photographic materials. It is responsible for large factories devoted to duplicating, addressing and similar services which can conveniently be centralized. It is now the printer to Parliament and His Majesty's Government, and with minor exceptions it publishes and sells all British official publications.

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1951

The disturbed national and international atmosphere during 1950 has not been without its effects on the affairs of the Association. Printing disputes have frequently…

Abstract

The disturbed national and international atmosphere during 1950 has not been without its effects on the affairs of the Association. Printing disputes have frequently delayed the appearance of Aslib publications and the scarcity of labour has made staff recruitment difficult. Notwithstanding these and other factors, the Council looks back on 1950 as a notable milestone in Aslib's history.

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2018

Mary T. Rodgers and James E. Payne

We find evidence that the runs on banks and trust companies in the Panic of 1907 were linked to the Bank of England’s contractionary monetary policy actions taken in 1906…

Abstract

We find evidence that the runs on banks and trust companies in the Panic of 1907 were linked to the Bank of England’s contractionary monetary policy actions taken in 1906 and 1907 through the medium of copper prices. Results from our vector autoregressive models and copper stockpile data support our argument that a copper commodity price channel may have been active in transmitting the Bank’s policy to the New York markets. Archival evidence suggests that the plunge in copper prices may have partially triggered both the initiation and the failure of an attempt to corner the shares of United Copper, and in turn, the bank and trust company runs related to that transaction’s failure. We suggest that the substantial short-term uncertainties accompanying the development of the copper-intensive electrical and telecommunications industries likely played a role in the plunge in copper prices. Additionally, we find evidence that the copper price transmission mechanism was also likely active in five other countries that year. While we do not argue that copper caused the 1907 crisis, we suggest that it was an active policy transmission channel amplifying the classic effect that was already spreading through the money market channel. If the bust in copper prices partially triggered the 1907 panic, then it provides additional evidence that contractionary monetary policy may have had an unintended, adverse consequence of contributing to a bank panic and, therefore, supports other recent findings that monetary policy deliberations might benefit from considering the policy impact on asset prices.

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Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-582-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1905

The first series of colours experimented upon was the high‐grade Kohnstamm colours, which have been physiologically tested and prepared especially for use in colouring…

Abstract

The first series of colours experimented upon was the high‐grade Kohnstamm colours, which have been physiologically tested and prepared especially for use in colouring food products. The results recorded below are not the results of a single determination, but the experiments were repeated until we were satisfied, working with the chemicals we used, and by the methods employed, that the results were uniform and reliable. The results with the Kohnstamm dyes are as follows : —

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British Food Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Ira Abdullah, Alisa G. Brink, C. Kevin Eller and Andrea Gouldman

We examine and compare current practices in teaching preparation in U.S. accounting, finance, management, and economics doctoral programs.

Abstract

Purpose

We examine and compare current practices in teaching preparation in U.S. accounting, finance, management, and economics doctoral programs.

Methodology/approach

We conduct an anonymous online survey of the pedagogical training practices experienced by Ph.D. students in accounting, finance, management, and economics programs in the United States.

Findings

Results indicate that accounting, finance, and management perform similarly with respect to providing doctoral students with first-hand teaching experience and requiring for-credit courses in teacher training. Accounting and management appear to utilize doctoral students as teaching assistants less than the other disciplines. A lower proportion of accounting doctoral students indicate that their program requires proof of English proficiency prior to teaching, and pedagogical mentoring is rare across disciplines. Accounting and management doctoral students feel more prepared to teach undergraduate courses compared to finance and economics students. However, all disciplines indicate a relative lack of perceived preparation to teach graduate courses.

Practical implications

This study provides empirical evidence of the current practices in pedagogical training of accounting, finance, management, and economics doctoral students.

Social implications

The results highlight several areas where accounting could possibly improve with regard to pedagogical training in doctoral programs. In particular we suggest (1) changes in the teaching evaluation process, (2) development of teaching mentorships, (3) implementing a teaching portfolio requirement, and (4) incorporation of additional methods of assisting non-native English speakers for teaching duties.

Originality/value

The study fills a gap in the literature regarding the pedagogical training in accounting doctoral programs.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-767-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1971

Earliest localism was sited on a tree or hill or ford, crossroads or whenceways, where people assembled to talk, (Sax. witan), or trade, (Sax. staple), in eggs, fowl, fish…

Abstract

Earliest localism was sited on a tree or hill or ford, crossroads or whenceways, where people assembled to talk, (Sax. witan), or trade, (Sax. staple), in eggs, fowl, fish or faggots. From such primitive beginnings many a great city has grown. Settlements and society brought changes; appointed headmen and officials, a cloak of legality, uplifted hands holding “men to witness”. Institutions tend to decay and many of these early forms passed away, but not the principle vital to the system. The parish an ecclesiastical institution, had no place until Saxons, originally heathens, became Christians and time came when Church, cottage and inn filled the lives of men, a state of localism in affairs which endured for centuries. The feudal system decayed and the vestry became the seat of local government. The novels of Thomas Hardy—and English literature boasts of no finer descriptions of life as it once was—depict this authority and the awe in which his smocked countrymen stood of “the vicar in his vestry”. The plague freed serfs and bondsmen, but events, such as the Poor Law of 1601, if anything, revived the parish as the organ of local government, but gradually secular and ecclesiastical aspects were divided and the great population explosion of the eighteenth century created necessity for subdivision of areas, which continued to serve the principle of localism however. The ballot box completed the eclipse of Church; it changed concepts of localism but not its importance in government.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 73 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

As part of a continuing programme to improve the Company's efficiency and competitiveness, the senior management of British Aerospace is being reorganised on a functional…

Abstract

As part of a continuing programme to improve the Company's efficiency and competitiveness, the senior management of British Aerospace is being reorganised on a functional basis. With effect from January 1, 1986, the titles and executive responsibilities of the following Directors of the Company will change:

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 58 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1980

The University of Essex are offering a new series of short “Laser Workshop” courses during the Spring of 1980, which are designed to make a number of important laser…

Abstract

The University of Essex are offering a new series of short “Laser Workshop” courses during the Spring of 1980, which are designed to make a number of important laser applications more widely known in industry and experts from many organisations have agreed to participate.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2013

Matti J. Haverila

The purpose of this study is to investigate the existence of inter-market market segments in the adolescents' and young adults' cell phone product-market in Finland…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the existence of inter-market market segments in the adolescents' and young adults' cell phone product-market in Finland, United Arab Emirates, Canada, China, and New Zealand. Drawing upon cell phone feature preferences criteria cited by Işıklar and Buyuközkan, the existence of inter-market market segments using these feature preferences as the cluster variate was examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a survey questionnaire, data was gathered from 403 high school and 892 undergraduate students in Finland, UAE, China, Canada and New Zealand.

Findings

The results of the study suggest the inter-market market segments do exist in the countries of this study, but their existence varies to some degree by country.

Originality/value

An important implication of the research is the existence of the five inter-market segments among the adolescents and young adults in the five countries was established. Consequently, the inter-market segments extend over the borders. The five inter-market segments exist in all country markets except in New Zealand, which included only four segments. These five segments also appear to be unique and large enough in size, which are the key requirements in terms of successful segmentation, and thus warrant the development of unique products, services and marketing programs for the segments.

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2006

Malcolm Vick and Fay Gasparini

Pictures are routinely identified as possible sources for researching history yet they are widely either neglected or underused. This article explores the use of pictorial…

Abstract

Pictures are routinely identified as possible sources for researching history yet they are widely either neglected or underused. This article explores the use of pictorial materials, in particular photographs, in historical analysis. It describes some common, or standard, uses of photographs in historical writing, and critically discusses them. It identifies and examines methodological and ethical issues in using photographs as evidence. And it draws on a current project which is using a rich body of photographs as an integral part of its analysis of the history of one educational institution to explore these issues

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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