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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Donald W. Kelly, Carl A. Reidsema and Merrill C.W. Lee

The purpose of this paper is to describe a post‐processing procedure for defining load paths and a load bearing topology using the stresses from a finite element analysis.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a post‐processing procedure for defining load paths and a load bearing topology using the stresses from a finite element analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

Cauchy stress vectors and a Runge‐Kutta algorithm are used to identify the paths being followed by load components aligned with the coordinate axes. An algorithm is then defined which identifies an efficient topology that will carry the loads by straightening the paths.

Findings

The aim of the algorithm is to provide insight into the way a structure is carrying loads by identifying the material most effective in performing the load transfer. The procedure is applied to a number of structures to demonstrate its applicability to structural design.

Research limitations/implications

The examples demonstrate an insight of structural behavior that is useful at the conceptual stage of the design process. The load paths identify load transfer and warn the designer of the creation of bending moments and the location of features such as holes on the load path. They also demonstrate that the new procedures can provide suggestions for alternate topologies for the load bearing structure.

Originality/value

The load path theory has been published elsewhere. The new work in this paper is the definition of the Runge‐Kutta algorithm to define the paths and the algorithm to identify the topology performing the load transfer.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2017

Tina Huesing and James D. Ludema

Despite the need for effective global leaders on the part of business (McKinsey, 2012) and the growing body of empirical research related to the topic of global leadership…

Abstract

Despite the need for effective global leaders on the part of business (McKinsey, 2012) and the growing body of empirical research related to the topic of global leadership (Osland, 2013a), very little is known about what global leaders actually do. How do they spend their time? In what kinds of activities are they involved? How do they communicate, coordinate, make decisions, and lead? How is their work similar to or different from that of domestic leaders? In this chapter, we respond to these questions by exploring the nature of global leaders’ work using an approach similar to Mintzberg (1973) in his classic book, The Nature of Managerial Work. We observed five global leaders from five different industries, each for 1 week, and compared our results with Mintzberg’s (1973). In addition, we conducted informal interviews and collected archival data. We content-analyzed the data using the conventions of grounded theory and identified 10 distinguishing characteristics of global leaders’ work. It is characterized by (1) multiple time zones and geographical distance; (2) long hours; (3) flexible schedules and fluid time; (4) dependence on technology; (5) time alone connected to others; (6) extensive travel; (7) functional expertise with global scope; (8) facilitation of information, advice, and action; (9) management of complexity; and (10) confrontation of risk. We conclude by discussing implications for future global leadership research.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-698-3

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Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Ann M. Johnston

This qualitative study explores the acquisition of global mindset in business executives who engaged in short-term business travel. Global mindset is operationalized as…

Abstract

This qualitative study explores the acquisition of global mindset in business executives who engaged in short-term business travel. Global mindset is operationalized as actively seeking to engage and reflect upon perspectives and orientations that both complement and contradict one’s own worldview. The narratives of 16 global supply chain leaders who work for a multinational company were content-analyzed. The results indicate that short-term business travel provides the context for participant reflection on their development as global leaders. They describe their development as a continuous evolution over time that is focused less on becoming a cultural expert and more on being culturally responsive in order to build relationships and achieve business results. The findings suggest that companies could take steps to leverage the developmental opportunity that short-term business travel represents.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

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Book part
Publication date: 21 September 2017

Patricia Drentea and Sarah Ballard

This qualitative study explores college students’ gender schemas. Sandra Bem’s pioneering work on sex roles and gender schemata are highlighted.

Abstract

Purpose

This qualitative study explores college students’ gender schemas. Sandra Bem’s pioneering work on sex roles and gender schemata are highlighted.

Methodology/approach

Over 600 college students at a diverse southeastern university were asked to describe the advantages and disadvantages to men’s and women’s gender. Although the question was framed broadly, students devoted significant attention to issues surrounding work and family, highlighting the importance of these roles to their understanding of gender. Over 6,800 responses were coded in The Ethnograph software.

Findings

The results showed a gendered schema among these students, with gendered views of work and family, in which men are associated with work and women largely with family. Some racial patterns are also discussed.

Social implications

This chapter ends with a discussion on how the gender schemas expressed support and maintained a separation of work and family.

Details

Discourses on Gender and Sexual Inequality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-197-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

W.A. Kelly

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Abstract

Details

Library Review, vol. 53 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

W.A. Kelly

Abstract

Details

Library Review, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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