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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2009

W. Rocky Newman, Mark D. Hanna, Thomas Gattiker and Xiaowen Huang

This paper proposes a framework that describes the boundary spanning supply chain management (SCM) initiatives taken by leading companies. Supported by existing literature…

Abstract

This paper proposes a framework that describes the boundary spanning supply chain management (SCM) initiatives taken by leading companies. Supported by existing literature and interviews with managers from large companies reflecting a cross section of businesses, the framework suggests four motivating domains or factors that could support SCM initiatives. They are supply chain understanding, design, improvement, and coordination. Based on the sand cone model, the framework also suggests four levels of SCM integration over which these motivating factors are relevant to the firm and/or supply chain. They range from no integration outside the functional silos of a single firm to a fully integrated multi‐tier supply chain. Unlike existing frameworks that are based upon the flow of material and information through the supply chain, our framework is derived by combining the concept of integration with the motivating domains that characterize SCM initiatives. It captures the combined and overlapping impact of supply chain initiatives from a more strategic perspective and is a useful additional resource for practitioners who seek to chart potential improvements to their supply chain from a competitive standpoint.

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American Journal of Business, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Mark D. Hanna, W. Rocky Newman and Pamela Johnson

This paper uses data from 349 employee involvement (EI) team projects to explore the relationships between process type, operational performance, employee involvement, and…

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5961

Abstract

This paper uses data from 349 employee involvement (EI) team projects to explore the relationships between process type, operational performance, employee involvement, and environmental performance. We investigate the stated goals and outcomes of EI team projects and relationships among these. For repetitive manufacturing processes in particular, we find strong relationships between the operational goals and outcomes of teams and the positive environmental impact outcome. To the extent that environmental performance results from operational systems, this paper suggests that the continuous improvement efforts of operations managers, including EI team projects, can be a key source of environmental improvements. Managers who understand this will take overt steps to leverage their operational improvement systems for environmental gains. From a theory development standpoint, questions are raised regarding the areas of potential synergy between operational and environmental improvement.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 1992

Mark D. Hanna, W. Rocky Newman and Sri V. Sridharan

Recently many manufacturers have emphasized the enhancement of customer service through increased manufacturing flexibility. Sophisticated models exist for the…

Abstract

Recently many manufacturers have emphasized the enhancement of customer service through increased manufacturing flexibility. Sophisticated models exist for the justification of modern automation technologies which could have an impact on manufacturing flexibility, but practitioners are more likely to utilize a simple tool such as cost‐volume break even analysis. Indeed, much of the difficulty that managers have in justifying modern automation technologies may be due to the shortsightedness of cost‐volume break even analysis. In this paper, we introduce an equally simple justification tool, cost‐volume‐flexibility break even analysis, and explain its use and the benefits accompanying its use.

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American Journal of Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 1994

W. Rocky Newman, Mark D. Hanna and William E. Youngdahl

This paper is based upon a framework which links the effective integration of manufacturing strategy into overall corporate strategy (Wheelwright and Hayes 1985) and…

Abstract

This paper is based upon a framework which links the effective integration of manufacturing strategy into overall corporate strategy (Wheelwright and Hayes 1985) and corporate attainment of environmental excellence (Winsemius and Guntram 1992). By exploring the practical implications of this framework, the paper suggests that improvement of environmental performance may depend on adequate integration of manufacturing strategy into overall corporate strategy. Hence, situations may commonly exist where corporate goals for environmental excellence remain unachieved due to insufficient development of manufacturing strategy, and manufacturing strategy integration may be a critical prerequisite to environmental excellence.

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American Journal of Business, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

W. Rocky Newman, Mark Hanna and Mary Jo Maffei

Provides an empirically based discussion of the uncertainties facedby typical manufacturing firms and how they attempt to accommodate thatuncertainty through increased…

Abstract

Provides an empirically based discussion of the uncertainties faced by typical manufacturing firms and how they attempt to accommodate that uncertainty through increased manufacturing flexibility. Suggests a dynamic equilibrium model which helps to illustrate the trade‐offs and interrelationships between the manufacturing flexibility inherent in a firm′s processes and infrastructure, the uncertainties faced by the firm, and the way in which the firm′s processes and infrastructures are buffered with inventory, lead time, and capacity. In addition, suggests a set of auditing checklists which build on earlier work by Skinner. This process helps the firm to identify its relative position in terms of the dynamic equilibrium model and also to identify long‐term objectives for improving its competitiveness within the marketplace.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

W. Rocky Newman and Mary Jo Maffei

Examines the relative effects of alternative approaches to dealing with the intractable problem of managing a job shop. The effect of routing flexibility, simple order…

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1007

Abstract

Examines the relative effects of alternative approaches to dealing with the intractable problem of managing a job shop. The effect of routing flexibility, simple order release mechanisms based on aggregate shop load, and local job prioritizing rules are examined together. While the impact of each experimental parameter is found to be significant, the impact of flexibility greatly overshadows those of the other parameters. These results support further examination and more normative understanding of how flexibility and better production planning and control may best be used in various competitive situations.

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

W. Rocky Newman and V. Sridharan

A manufacturing planning and control (MPC) system is a major partof the infrastructure used by a firm to enhance its competitiveposition. Although a clear understanding of…

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1848

Abstract

A manufacturing planning and control (MPC) system is a major part of the infrastructure used by a firm to enhance its competitive position. Although a clear understanding of the mechanics and benefits of alternative MPC systems exists, very little is known about the relationships between such systems, the strategic environment faced by the user‐firms, and their performance in achieving cost/competitive advantage. Historically, the choice of an MPC system appears to have been made based solely on available in‐house expertise, industry trends, or plain inertia. Reports a summary of the results of a survey conducted to explore empirically the relationship between the environmental characteristics faced by the manufacturing function and manufacturing performance of firms using alternative MPC systems. Presents the results of an analysis of the environment faced by best and worst performers using different MPC systems. The results indicate key linkages between the MPC systems, environment, and performance.

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2003

Jonathan L Gifford

Abstract

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Flexible Urban Transportation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-050656-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

W. Rocky Newman and Mark D. Hanna

Explores the interrelationships between environmental issues and manufacturing strategy. Based on the theoretical underpinnings of previous work in the field of…

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2333

Abstract

Explores the interrelationships between environmental issues and manufacturing strategy. Based on the theoretical underpinnings of previous work in the field of manufacturing strategy and insights from an open‐ended and exploratory survey of strategic decision makers in a wide variety of manufacturing settings, attempts to illustrate the potential synergies between environmental management and manufacturing strategy. Expands the models of Wheelwright and Hayes (1985) and Hill (1994) in order to suggest that operational excellence may provide leverage towards environmental excellence for manufacturers.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Joshua Doane, Judy A. Lane and Michael J. Pisani

Volume 25 celebrates the 25th year of publication for the American Journal of Business (AJB). Launched by eight MAC schools of business in March 1986, the Journal has…

Abstract

Volume 25 celebrates the 25th year of publication for the American Journal of Business (AJB). Launched by eight MAC schools of business in March 1986, the Journal has featured more than 700 authors who have contributed more than 330 research articles at the intersection of theory and practice. From accounting to marketing, management to finance, the Journal prominently covers the breadth of the business disciplines as a general business outlet intended for both practitioners and academics. As the Journal reaches out beyond the MAC in sponsorship, authorship, and readership, we assess the Journal’s first quarter century of impact.

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American Journal of Business, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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