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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

J. Gordon and W. Dryden

Presents an overview of the basic theory and practice ofRational‐Emotive Therapy (RET). Discusses the goals and values of RET,including its view of the three main…

Abstract

Presents an overview of the basic theory and practice of Rational‐Emotive Therapy (RET). Discusses the goals and values of RET, including its view of the three main irrational ideas which underpin emotional disturbance. Outlines RET in action through a case example. Concludes that, while RET focuses on the individual, its emphasis on striving for well‐being and fulfilment usually entails social and organisational dividends.

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Employee Councelling Today, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

R. Kwiatkowski and W. Dryden

Discusses four ways of conceptualising counselling: as a set ofskills, as a relationship, as a means of attaining outcomes, and as aset of definable tasks. Considers the…

Abstract

Discusses four ways of conceptualising counselling: as a set of skills, as a relationship, as a means of attaining outcomes, and as a set of definable tasks. Considers the issues arising from the BAC definition of counselling, Patterson′s (1974) approach, and the debate about counselling versus psychotherapy. Surmises that the four conceptualisations of counselling are not mutually exclusive, but it is important to examine the exact nature of counselling in order to do the job well.

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Employee Councelling Today, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Stacey L. McCallum, Antonina A. Mikocka-Walus, Hannah Keage, Owen Churches and Jane Andrews

This paper describes the development of a novel integrative self-directed treatment tool which uses cognitive behavioural therapy techniques to reduce anxiety symptoms in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes the development of a novel integrative self-directed treatment tool which uses cognitive behavioural therapy techniques to reduce anxiety symptoms in patients presenting to treatment for alcohol-related problems. More specifically, the purpose of this paper is to explore patient and health practitioner perceptions of the booklet, in order to determine its suitability and utility in the context of existing alcohol treatment services. The extent of cross-informant agreement between patient and health practitioner responses is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

This research utilises a cross-sectional qualitative research design using semi-structured interview methods with patients presenting to hospital for alcohol-related diseases/illnesses/accidents/injuries (n=15) and practitioners (n=10) working at inpatient, outpatient and residential substance treatment facilities.

Findings

The present study found that the majority of patients (80 per cent) and practitioners (90 per cent) expressed a motivation to utilise the proposed booklet, agreeing that the booklet was a practical, achievable and educational resource for patients suffering from co-occurring anxiety symptoms in substance abuse facilities. Participants outlined limitations of the resource, suggesting that the booklet would be most suitable for patients with moderate to high cognitive ability, who also exhibit a motivation to change alcohol consumption and have access to additional support.

Practical implications

Findings from the present study suggest that the booklet may be most effective in improving treatment accessibility and patient treatment seeking behaviours; rather than reducing practitioner-patient contact.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the development and utility of a novel resource suitable for substance abuse treatment facilities. The findings and feedback produced from the present study can assist with modifications of the intervention and in improving the effectiveness of future trials.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Radha R. Sharma and Sir Cary Cooper

Abstract

Details

Executive Burnout
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-285-9

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Scott Harris Waltman and Angelique Palermo

The term catastrophizing was coined by Ellis (1962) and commented on by Beck (1979). Since that time, much research has been done on the topic and a recent review article…

Abstract

Purpose

The term catastrophizing was coined by Ellis (1962) and commented on by Beck (1979). Since that time, much research has been done on the topic and a recent review article postulated that catastrophizing served as a transdiagnostic mechanism across the psychiatric disorders (Gellatly and Beck, 2016). In rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT), there is a greater emphasis placed on the underlying irrational beliefs than the surface-level automatic thoughts; therefore, REBT therapists tend to focus on Awfulizing as opposed to catastrophizing. While these terms sound similar, it is unclear what theoretical overlap and distinction exists between the concepts. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a review and synthesis of the extant literature, drawing from both theorists and empirical studies, to map out the similar and unique aspects of each cognition.

Findings

Awfulizing and catastrophizing are distinct concepts with differing effects on cognitive, affective and behavioral responses; these findings extend beyond theoretical models and are supported by empirical literature.

Originality/value

This review has direct implications for practitioners of the cognitive and behavioral therapies, including REBT, and those seeking an integration of the cognitive therapies.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2013

Darren Good, Bauback Yeganeh and Robin Yeganeh

Traditional clinical psychological practices have often been adapted for the context of executive coaching. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in particular is the most…

Abstract

Traditional clinical psychological practices have often been adapted for the context of executive coaching. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in particular is the most scientifically supported psychological modality. CBT like other practices has been used in coaching as cognitive behavioral coaching but rarely discussed more explicitly for the executive population. Here, we offer a specific adaptation – cognitive behavioral executive coaching (CBEC) – and suggest that it presents a flexible structure that can meet the multiple agendas that are framed for executive coaching. Additionally, the core features of CBT and CBEC in particular satisfy the major needs of executives in coaching arrangements. We conclude by demonstrating a CBEC process model for coaching the high-performing executive.

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Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-891-4

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Abstract

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The Future of HR
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-179-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

O.S. Aleksić, P.M. Nikolić and D.M. Todorović

A new model for thick film resistor calculation accounts for the physical effects which make variations in local sheet resistivity and local volume resistivity: geometry…

Abstract

A new model for thick film resistor calculation accounts for the physical effects which make variations in local sheet resistivity and local volume resistivity: geometry and terminal diffusion effects. Taking the criterion of homogeneity in the observations of local resistivity, a resistor is transformed geometrically and electrically into equivalent modular parts. Comparing the resistor transformed by equivalent geometrical and electrical transformation (EGET) with an ideal resistor a new semi‐empirical formula for thick film resistor calculation was evaluated. This model takes into account the technological process which makes possible more accurate resistor projection compared with other models.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Wolfgang G. Scherl

This chapter introduces a new theoretical framework for developing emotion-related abilities according to the emotional intelligence (EI) construct definition of Mayer…

Abstract

This chapter introduces a new theoretical framework for developing emotion-related abilities according to the emotional intelligence (EI) construct definition of Mayer, Salovey, and Caruso (2006). The awareness, reflection, and management (ARM) model has been devised and demonstrates a triadic cycle of emotional ARM relating to affect, cognition, and behavior. The ARM model constitutes an approach to nurture emotion-related abilities (ability EI) and responds to criticism raised by Zeidner, Matthews, and Roberts (2009). The ARM Theory was corroborated by both learning theory and schools of counselling (SOC). The potential to develop emotion-related abilities in emotional awareness, reflection and reasoning, coping and management is discussed.

Details

Individual Sources, Dynamics, and Expressions of Emotion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-889-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Petruska Clarkson

The article seeks to differentiate counselling and psychotherapy sothat users can distinguish between different kinds of service provision.Roles, functions…

Abstract

The article seeks to differentiate counselling and psychotherapy so that users can distinguish between different kinds of service provision. Roles, functions, qualifications, training, areas of competence, distinctive focus and professional organisations are specifically defined for counsellors and psychotherapists. The article similarly but more briefly describes the “core professions”: psychiatrist, psychologist; clinical, occupational and counselling psychologists. Emphasis is placed on areas in common and the value of counselling.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

Keywords

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