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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Robert M. Randall

W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, professors of strategy at INSEAD and co-directors of the INSEAD Blue Ocean Strategy Institute, introduced and defined the theory and…

Abstract

Purpose

W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, professors of strategy at INSEAD and co-directors of the INSEAD Blue Ocean Strategy Institute, introduced and defined the theory and practice of blue ocean strategy – a unique methodology for creating commercially relevant new market space – in 2005. Despite the widespread interest in the concept, many managers still aren’t clear how blue ocean strategy differs from disruption theory, niche marketing, customer-focused innovation and other pioneering practices.

Design/methodology/approach

To better understand how to use blue ocean strategy methodologies and tools, the interviewer asked the researchers to explain some of the underpinning concepts.

Findings

Blue ocean strategy is about being first to get the customer offering right by linking innovation to value.

Practical implications

A blue ocean strategist gains insights about reconstructing market boundaries not by looking at existing customers, but by exploring noncustomers.

Originality/value

Managers will learn how to use blue ocean strategy to break the value-cost trade off, thereby opening up new market space.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Brian Leavy

To study blue ocean strategy (value innovation management), which not only reframes the strategic challenge – from competing to making the competition irrelevant – but

Abstract

Purpose

To study blue ocean strategy (value innovation management), which not only reframes the strategic challenge – from competing to making the competition irrelevant – but also provides a series of tools and frameworks to act on this insight in a way that maximizes the opportunity and minimizes the risk.

Design/methodology/approach

This interview with Professors W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne considers the concept of value innovation management and examines the ideas and tools they developed in their book Blue Ocean Strategy (Harvard Business School Press, 2005), the product of a successful twenty‐year research and consultancy partnership.

Findings

Blue ocean strategy is applicable across all types of industries from typical consumer product goods to b2b. It offers an alternative approach to the existing strategic planning process, one that is based not on preparing a spreadsheet document but on drawing a strategy canvas.

Research limitations/implications

The interview gives professors Kim and Mauborgne an opportunity to summarize many of their recent research findings.

Practical implications

As blue ocean strategy represents a significant departure from the status quo, managers typically face four hurdles to execution: first, cognitive: waking employees up to the need for a strategic shift; second, limited resources: the greater the shift in strategy, the greater the resources needed to execute it; third, motivation: inspire key players to move fast and tenaciously to carry out a break from the status quo; and fourth, organizational politics. Leaders must identify and effectively deal with internal opponents to change.

Originality/value

Provides a unique overview of value innovation management, its principles, tools, and techniques.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Zach W.Y. Lee, Tommy K.H. Chan, M.S. Balaji and Alain Yee-Loong Chong

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of inhibiting, motivating, and technological factors on users’ intention to participate in the sharing economy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of inhibiting, motivating, and technological factors on users’ intention to participate in the sharing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-reported online survey was conducted among Uber users in Hong Kong. A total of 295 valid responses were collected. The research model was empirically tested using the structural equation modeling technique.

Findings

The results suggested that perceived risks, perceived benefits, trust in the platform, and perceived platform qualities were significant predictors of users’ intention to participate in Uber.

Research limitations/implications

This study bridged the research gaps in the sharing economy literature by examining the effects of perceived risks, perceived benefits, and trust in the platform on users’ intention to participate in the sharing economy. Moreover, this study enriched the extended valence framework by incorporating perceived platform qualities into the research model, responding to the calls for the inclusion of technological variables in information systems research.

Practical implications

The findings provided practitioners with insights into enhancing users’ intention to participate in the sharing economy.

Originality/value

This study presented one of the first attempts to systematically examine the effects of inhibiting, motivating, and technological factors on users’ intention to participate in the sharing economy.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2018

Brian Leavy

This masterclass examines the blue ocean value innovation process, how it works in practice and how it has evolved since the publication of Blue Ocean Strategy (2005) by W

Abstract

Purpose

This masterclass examines the blue ocean value innovation process, how it works in practice and how it has evolved since the publication of Blue Ocean Strategy (2005) by W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne as explored in their new book their new book Blue Ocean Shift (2017).

Design/methodology/approach

The main focus is the value innovation methodology that underlies blue ocean strategy.

Findings

Blue ocean strategy is a process of value innovation that uncovers new aggregations of demand by redefining the offering category.

Practical implications

Blue ocean strategy tends to focus on value innovation that uncovers new aggregations of demand by redefining the category while disruptive innovation tends to concentrate on new demand-creation that expands the current served market.

Originality/value

Blue ocean strategy sets out to reconfigure value propositions in compelling new ways that can deliver a quantum leap beyond the current red ocean value-cost frontier through raising buyer value and lowering company costs simultaneously. The emphasis on both value and innovation is essential to the creation of new “blue ocean” market spaces.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Stan Abraham

This report on the Fifth Annual Conference of the Association of Strategic Planning (ASP), “Strategy in action: lessons from practice,” was held in Long Beach, California…

Abstract

This report on the Fifth Annual Conference of the Association of Strategic Planning (ASP), “Strategy in action: lessons from practice,” was held in Long Beach, California. This report covers the two keynote speakers plus highlights from a selection of the presentations (for more information see the ASP website: www.strategyplus.org). PurposeThe article summarizes the highlights of the Association for Strategic Planning's 2006 Annual Conference held on February 28, 2006 in Long Beach, California, one of the premier strategic‐planning conferences in the US. Design/methodology/approachThis is reportage on the annual ASP conference. FindingsThe remarks of the two keynote speakers are summarized: W. Chan Kim's on “blue ocean strategy” that makes the competition irrelevant, and Milind Lele's remarks on situational monopolies that also, for a time, gets rid of competition. Both authors' remarks were based on recently published best selling books. In addition, of 40 other presentations offered in concurrent sessions, the article highlights a select few, enough to give a flavor of the conference theme of “Strategy in action – lessons from practice”. Practical implicationsThe actual conference (and this report) was targeted both to practitioners and strategic consultants eager to learn about the latest methods and pitfalls in doing strategic planning. Originality/valueBoth audiences will benefit from reading this article principally by learning about the experiences, experiments, and successes of other companies' and consultants' efforts in actually doing strategic planning.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Anna V. Shokhnekh, Olga A. Mironova, Lidiya A. Sizeneva, Marina N. Semenova and Al-Muttar Mohammed Yousif Oudah

The chapter presents a mechanism of innovational development of cluster of the hospitality industry in the system of region's economic security, which formation takes…

Abstract

The chapter presents a mechanism of innovational development of cluster of the hospitality industry in the system of region's economic security, which formation takes place in the conditions of complex turbulent state of economy, which leads to crises of various scales and volumes. Cluster is treated as a platform that unifies efforts and partnership interactions between large, medium, and small business and synthesizes expectations of consumers on the basis of territorial concentration of readiness to care about a customer in the form of provision of the need: (1) selection and readiness of consumer to accept a specific complex service of the hospitality industry (with tourist service complexes); (2) movement (with transport complex); (3) accommodation (with hotel complex), (4) readiness for catering (with catering complex); (5) entertainment (with participation of complex of entertainment); (6) security (with security complex). The process of clustering leads to a new treatment of the notion of competition, development of capabilities to be a business partner, and finding advantages in generation of innovations together with intermediaries and neighbors.

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Huiying Du, Ge Zhu, Limin Zhao and Tingjie Lv

As the market competition becomes increasingly intensive and the profit from traditional voice services margins gradually decline, 3G telecom operators must provide…

Abstract

Purpose

As the market competition becomes increasingly intensive and the profit from traditional voice services margins gradually decline, 3G telecom operators must provide various value‐added services to enhance the ARPU (average revenue per user). The purpose of this paper is to recognize the factors infecting the adoption of 3G value‐added services.

Design/methodology/approach

The TAM (technology acceptance model) was used as the foundation to further understand consumer's behavioral intention to use 3G value‐added services. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to develop a conceptual model of customer adoption and nine important factors were proposed. The authors conducted a questionnaire investigation, using a large sample, in the Chinese 3G value‐added service market. SPSS and AMOS were applied to analyze the survey data.

Findings

The empirical findings are: security and social influence are two of the most important factors in 3G market; 3G value‐added services must be perceived as enjoyment and useful; using context should be friendly and compatible; and in a whole view, the influence from gender, ease of use and need for unique to adoption intention is not significant, but to separate as two models, the difference is huge – the female group considers more about price and usefulness, while the male group thinks about enjoyment and compatibility.

Practical implications

The sample of this study is limited at the range of empirical data; the development of 3G technology has not yet been perfected in China and this study fails to include all of the 3G value‐added services, some of which are still in the exploratory phase of development. At the same time, the cities in this study cannot be said to represent the present stage of the whole of China.

Originality/value

The paper develops a conceptual structural equation model on the area of 3G value‐added services in China. The findings in the paper would help 3G providers to improve their services.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Ben Lowe, Md. Rajibul Hasan and Saju Valliara Jose

Pro-poor innovations are innovations targeted at economically poor consumers. These innovations have the potential to improve consumer wellbeing. However, while take up of…

Abstract

Pro-poor innovations are innovations targeted at economically poor consumers. These innovations have the potential to improve consumer wellbeing. However, while take up of some such innovations has been rapid (e.g., mobile phones) take up of others has been slower (e.g., fuel efficient stoves). What explains why some pro-poor innovations fail and some succeed? While the literature on consumer innovation adoption in economically wealthy countries is vast, there is very little literature in the context of the “bottom-of-the-pyramid” (BoP) and subsistence marketplaces. This chapter aims to begin answering this question through a review of the extant literature in the area of consumer innovation adoption, which is integrated with literature in the area of consumption within subsistence marketplaces and the BoP. A conceptual model is proposed which outlines key parameters for marketers and managers. The chapter closes by outlining implications and a future research agenda.

Details

Bottom of the Pyramid Marketing: Making, Shaping and Developing BoP Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-556-6

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Jian Mou, Jason Cohen, Yongxiang Dou and Bo Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a model of the uncertainties and benefits influencing the repurchase intentions of buyers in cross-border e-commerce (CBEC).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a model of the uncertainties and benefits influencing the repurchase intentions of buyers in cross-border e-commerce (CBEC).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on the valence framework to hypothesize effects of positive valences (utilitarian benefits) along with negative valences (pre- and post-contractual uncertainties) on buyers’ repeat purchase intentions. Data were collected using an online survey from 378 international B2C buyers on a CBEC platform in China.

Findings

Results explain 51.4 percent of the variance and reveal that overall value, as determined by monetary saving, convenience and product offerings as positive valences, exerts the strongest effect on repeat purchase intention. However, negative valences remain significant, and are particularly salient for female shoppers.

Research limitations/implications

The authors extend the valence theory into the study of repeat purchase behavior and contribute to much needed literature on why consumers return to repurchase from a CBEC platform.

Practical implications

Repeat purchase and loyalty of online consumers is essential for success of e-commerce providers. The results help online providers competing in international markets understand how buyers form repurchase intentions based on their evaluations of both value and uncertainty.

Originality/value

Buyer behavior in CBEC has received relatively less attention than domestic e-commerce. This paper is among the first to examine how both positive and negative valences combine to effect repurchase intention of international buyers in CBEC.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

W. Chan Kim and R.A. Mauborgne

The challenge for executives is to transcend the blinders imposed by their home cultures if operations in foreign cultures are to flourish.

Abstract

The challenge for executives is to transcend the blinders imposed by their home cultures if operations in foreign cultures are to flourish.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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