Search results

1 – 10 of 31
Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2014

Jamie Wood, Antonella Liuzzo Scorpo, Silvia Taylor, Muzna Rahman, Erin Bell and Lucinda Matthews-Jones

Social bookmarking is an online tool that can enable students to develop their skills in finding, sharing and (re)organising online information. Research has demonstrated…

Abstract

Social bookmarking is an online tool that can enable students to develop their skills in finding, sharing and (re)organising online information. Research has demonstrated that it has the potential to impact positively on students’ digital literacies – their ability to use the Internet critically to support their learning – and particularly on the kinds of online research skills that are vital to supporting inquiry-based approaches to learning and teaching in history. This chapter provides a detailed overview of how online social bookmarking tools have been used to support the development of students’ digital literacies in history in a number of UK higher education institutions. The general approach which has been adopted is based on constructivist principles and requires students to develop their skills and appreciation of the Internet as a venue for scholarly research in order to strengthen their inquiry skills in preparation for more independent work at higher levels of study. The chapter presents evaluative data that has been collected from students who have used social bookmarking to support inquiry activities within modules and as part of their independent learning activities. We also report staff reflections on the usefulness of social bookmarking to support student learning in history and make some recommendations for the practical application of such tools elsewhere. These include the potential significant impact of social bookmarking on students’ ability to interact productively and creatively with online resources in the course of their learning; the usefulness of the tool in supporting collaborative working and sharing materials; the need to ensure that students receive adequate training in using social bookmarking and that their work receives adequate credit (which will, in turn, increase motivation).

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2021

Alessandra Girardi, Elanor Lucy Webb and Ashimesh Roychowdhury

Self-harm is a cause of concern for health-care professionals. The Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START) is a short-term assessment instrument used to…

Abstract

Purpose

Self-harm is a cause of concern for health-care professionals. The Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START) is a short-term assessment instrument used to rate the likelihood of risk behaviours, including self-harm. As result of the assessment, interventions that are implemented to reduce the risk of self-harm may reduce the strength of the predictive validity of a risk assessment tool. The aim of this study was explore the impact of risk management interventions on the capacity of START to predict self-harm. It was predicted that the interventions would weaken the ability of START to predict self-harm in patients who received the intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary analysis of routinely collected data in a large sample of women in an inpatient secure care setting. Demographic and clinical information, self-harm episodes, safety management interventions and START assessments were extracted and used to build an anonymous database.

Findings

START significantly predicted self-harm in those with and without the safety management intervention. However, the strength of the predictive validity was smaller in those who received the intervention compared to those without.

Practical implications

The results suggest that the implementation of safety management interventions needs to be taken into account when assessing future risk of self-harm.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to explore the impact of safety management interventions on the predictive validity of START in a large sample of women.

Article
Publication date: 22 May 2019

Helen Walker, Lindsay Tulloch, Karen Boa, Gordon Ritchie and John Thompson

A major difficulty identified many years ago in psychiatric care is the shortage of appropriate instruments with which to carry out valid and reliable therapeutic…

Abstract

Purpose

A major difficulty identified many years ago in psychiatric care is the shortage of appropriate instruments with which to carry out valid and reliable therapeutic assessments which are behaviourally based and therefore appropriate for use in a variety of contexts. The aim of this project was to ascertain the utility of a forensic nursing risk assessment tool - Behavioural Status Index (BEST-Index). The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-site cross-sectional survey was undertaken using mixed method design. Quantitative data was generated using BEST-Index to allow comparisons across three different levels of security (high, medium and low) in Scotland and Ireland. Qualitative data were gathered from patients and multi-disciplinary team (MDT) members using semi-structured interviews and questionnaire.

Findings

Measured over an 18-month period, there was a statistically significant improvement in behaviour, when comparing patients in high and medium secure hospitals. Two key themes emerged from patient and staff perspectives: “acceptance of the process” and “production and delivery of information”, respectively. The wider MDT acknowledge the value of nursing risk assessment, but require adequate information to enable them to interpret findings. Collaborating with patients to undertake risk assessments can enhance future care planning.

Research limitations/implications

Studies using cross-section can only provide information at fixed points in time.

Practical implications

The BEST-Index assessment tool is well established in clinical practice and has demonstrated good utility.

Originality/value

This project has served to highlight the unique contribution of BEST-Index to both staff and patients alike and confirm its robustness and versatility across differing levels of security in Scottish and Irish forensic mental health services.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2014

Abstract

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Barry George and M. Somora

On 8 October 1992 the ISHM‐Benelux Chapter organised a one‐day conference entitled ‘New Trends in Electronic Packaging and Interconnection’ which took place in the Holiday…

Abstract

On 8 October 1992 the ISHM‐Benelux Chapter organised a one‐day conference entitled ‘New Trends in Electronic Packaging and Interconnection’ which took place in the Holiday Inn, Gent, Belgium. This conference was attended by 45 participants from the Benelux countries and Great Britain.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

Article
Publication date: 21 July 2020

Arshey M. and Angel Viji K. S.

Phishing is a serious cybersecurity problem, which is widely available through multimedia, such as e-mail and Short Messaging Service (SMS) to collect the personal…

Abstract

Purpose

Phishing is a serious cybersecurity problem, which is widely available through multimedia, such as e-mail and Short Messaging Service (SMS) to collect the personal information of the individual. However, the rapid growth of the unsolicited and unwanted information needs to be addressed, raising the necessity of the technology to develop any effective anti-phishing methods.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary intention of this research is to design and develop an approach for preventing phishing by proposing an optimization algorithm. The proposed approach involves four steps, namely preprocessing, feature extraction, feature selection and classification, for dealing with phishing e-mails. Initially, the input data set is subjected to the preprocessing, which removes stop words and stemming in the data and the preprocessed output is given to the feature extraction process. By extracting keyword frequency from the preprocessed, the important words are selected as the features. Then, the feature selection process is carried out using the Bhattacharya distance such that only the significant features that can aid the classification are selected. Using the selected features, the classification is done using the deep belief network (DBN) that is trained using the proposed fractional-earthworm optimization algorithm (EWA). The proposed fractional-EWA is designed by the integration of EWA and fractional calculus to determine the weights in the DBN optimally.

Findings

The accuracy of the methods, naive Bayes (NB), DBN, neural network (NN), EWA-DBN and fractional EWA-DBN is 0.5333, 0.5455, 0.5556, 0.5714 and 0.8571, respectively. The sensitivity of the methods, NB, DBN, NN, EWA-DBN and fractional EWA-DBN is 0.4558, 0.5631, 0.7035, 0.7045 and 0.8182, respectively. Likewise, the specificity of the methods, NB, DBN, NN, EWA-DBN and fractional EWA-DBN is 0.5052, 0.5631, 0.7028, 0.7040 and 0.8800, respectively. It is clear from the comparative table that the proposed method acquired the maximal accuracy, sensitivity and specificity compared with the existing methods.

Originality/value

The e-mail phishing detection is performed in this paper using the optimization-based deep learning networks. The e-mails include a number of unwanted messages that are to be detected in order to avoid the storage issues. The importance of the method is that the inclusion of the historical data in the detection process enhances the accuracy of detection.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Emma Mckenzie and Joel Harvey

New psychoactive substances (NPS) are increasingly being used in secure mental health settings. Within these settings, NPS use presents a range of challenges and staff…

Abstract

Purpose

New psychoactive substances (NPS) are increasingly being used in secure mental health settings. Within these settings, NPS use presents a range of challenges and staff currently lack adequate training to manage these challenges. The purpose of this paper is to explore nursing staffs’ perception of the challenges of working with patients who use NPS and to explore nursing staffs’ perception of their training needs in relation to NPS.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional qualitative design was employed. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight nursing staff from a medium secure unit (MSU).

Findings

A thematic analysis identified three overarching themes: “There Will Always Be Something”, “We Are Doing Our Best” and “If We Know More, We Can Do More”. The findings describe how nursing staff manage NPS use at present, and their perceptions of how training could improve their management of NPS use in the future.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that MSUs require a local policy for managing NPS use. The research implies that staff training programmes should recognise the existing methods staff use to manage NPS use. The findings also suggest that NPS interventions should target the whole peer group and not just the individual using NPS.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the limited literature on NPS. The findings demonstrate the importance of developing evidence-based mechanisms for managing NPS use. Changes to practice are suggested, with the view of developing ways in which staff currently manage NPS use by complementing this with specific training on NPS.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2022

Qing-Wen Zhang, Pin-Chao Liao, Mingxuan Liang and Albert P.C. Chan

Quality failures in grid infrastructure construction would cause large-scale collapses in power supply and additional expenditures by reworks and repairs. Learning from…

Abstract

Purpose

Quality failures in grid infrastructure construction would cause large-scale collapses in power supply and additional expenditures by reworks and repairs. Learning from quality failures (LFQF) extracts experience from previous quality events and converts them into preventive measures to reduce or eliminate future construction quality issues. This study aims to investigate the influence factors of LFQF in the construction of grid infrastructure.

Design/methodology/approach

The related factors of LFQF, including quality management (QM) practices, quality rectification, and individual learning, were identified by reviewing literature about organizational learning and extracting experience from previous failures. A questionnaire survey was distributed to the grid companies in North, Northeast, Northwest, East, Central, and Southwest China. 381 valid responses collected and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM) to test the influence of these factors on LFQF.

Findings

The SEM results support that QM practices positively affect individual learning and LFQF. Quality rectification indirectly impacts LFQF via individual learning, while the results did not support the direct link between quality rectification and LFQF.

Practical implications

The findings strengthen practical insights into extracting experience from poor-quality issues and continuous improvement. The contributory factors of LFQF found in this study benefit the practitioners by taking effective measures to enhance organizational learning capability and improve the long-term construction quality performance in the grid infrastructure industry.

Originality/value

Existing research about the application of LFQF still stays at the explorative and conceptual stage. This study investigates the related factors of LFQF, including QM practices, quality rectification, and individual learning, extending the model development of learning from failures (LFF) in construction QM.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 January 2022

Mario Diz-Otero, Iago Portela-Pino, Sara Domínguez-Lloria and Margarita Pino-Juste

Continuous training in professional teaching competencies has become one of the challenges of the school of the 21st century, especially if we refer to the mastery of…

Abstract

Purpose

Continuous training in professional teaching competencies has become one of the challenges of the school of the 21st century, especially if we refer to the mastery of digital competence. The aim of this study is to analyze the degree of digital competence of secondary school teachers of different areas of knowledge during the global pandemic of COVID-19 in the Galician autonomous community and obtain data that allow us to infer whether there is an association between individual variables such as age, gender, degree, work experience and their mastery of digital competence.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional descriptive quasi-experimental study is performed using an accidental sample of secondary school teachers from different fields of knowledge.

Findings

The different results obtained determine that the level of knowledge and use of digital media and tools is low. There are no significant differences depending on the variables analyzed, but it is necessary to establish specific continuing education plans for the improvement of digital competence in secondary school teachers to enable the effective use and management of information and communication technologies in future professionals.

Originality/value

Therefore, the findings of this study allow the development of educational interventions focused on increasing the digital competence of teachers, taking into account their individual characteristics.

Details

Education + Training, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Victoria L. Murphy, Allison Littlejohn and Bart Rienties

Learning from incidents (LFI) is an organisational process that high-risk industries use following an accident or near-miss to prevent similar events. Literature on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Learning from incidents (LFI) is an organisational process that high-risk industries use following an accident or near-miss to prevent similar events. Literature on the topic has presented a fragmented conceptualisation of learning in this context. This paper aims to present a holistic taxonomy of the different aspects of LFI from the perspective of front-line staff.

Design/methodology/approach

The 3-P model of workplace learning was used to guide a thematic analysis of interview data from 45 participants, exploring learner factors, learning context, learning processes and learning products.

Findings

The analysis was used to create a taxonomy of 21 aspects of learning, grouped into themes using the 3-P model of workplace learning. Many of the aspects of learning reflected previous literature, such as the importance of open communication. The analysis additionally demonstrated the interconnected nature of organisational and individual level learning, as well as how formal resources are needed to support informal learning in this context.

Originality/value

This study presents a holistic taxonomy of LFI from the perspective of front-line staff, addressing a known challenge of LFI literature being fragmented. Additionally, it provides examples of how aspects of organisational learning would influence individual-level learning and vice versa, adding to the relatively sparse number of studies that have explored this aspect. Finally, the paper highlights how informal learning in contexts where workers continually need to make sense of unseen hazards depends on formal learning activities and resources.

1 – 10 of 31