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Article

Holley R. Lange, George Philip, Bradley C. Watson, John Kountz, Samuel T. Waters and George Doddington

A real potential exists for library use of voice technologies: as aids to the disabled or illiterate library user, as front‐ends for general library help systems, in…

Abstract

A real potential exists for library use of voice technologies: as aids to the disabled or illiterate library user, as front‐ends for general library help systems, in online systems for commands or control words, and in many of the hands‐busy‐eyes‐busy activities that are common in libraries. Initially, these applications would be small, limited processes that would not require the more fluent human‐machine communication that we might hope for in the future. Voice technologies will depend on and benefit from new computer systems, advances in artificial intelligence and expert systems to facilitate their use and enable them to better circumvent present input and output problems. These voice systems will gradually assume more importance, improving access to information and complementing existing systems, but they will not likely revolutionize or dominate human‐machine communications or library services in the near future.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part

Katerina Berezina, Olena Ciftci and Cihan Cobanoglu

Purpose: The purpose of this chapter is to review and critically evaluate robots, artificial intelligence and service automation (RAISA) applications in the restaurant…

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this chapter is to review and critically evaluate robots, artificial intelligence and service automation (RAISA) applications in the restaurant industry to educate professors, graduate students, and industry professionals.

Design/methodology/approach: This chapter is a survey of applications of RAISA in restaurants. The chapter is based on the review of professional and peer-reviewed academic literature, and the industry insight section was prepared based on a 50-minute interview with Mr. Juan Higueros, Chief Operations Officer of Bear Robotics.

Findings: Various case studies presented in this chapter illustrate numerous possibilities for automation: from automating a specific function to complete automation of the front of the house (e.g., Eatsa) or back of the house (e.g., Spyce robotic kitchen). The restaurant industry has already adopted chatbots; voice-activated and biometric technologies; robots as hosts, food runners, chefs, and bartenders; tableside ordering; conveyors; and robotic food delivery.

Practical implications: The chapter presents professors and students with a detailed overview of RAISA in the restaurant industry that will be useful for educational and research purposes. Restaurant owners and managers may also benefit from reading this chapter as they will learn about the current state of technology and opportunities for RAISA implementation.

Originality/value: To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this chapter presents the first systematic and in-depth review of RAISA technologies in the restaurant industry.

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Robots, Artificial Intelligence, and Service Automation in Travel, Tourism and Hospitality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-688-0

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Article

Holley R. Lange

Voice as the communications device for computer—human interaction is not a new concept, having been a favorite of the SF writers for many years. It is the most immediate…

Abstract

Voice as the communications device for computer—human interaction is not a new concept, having been a favorite of the SF writers for many years. It is the most immediate and natural means of communication, and is in use today as voice response or voice recognition systems for human—computer interfaces in business, industry and medicine. This article examines the potential for their use within the library environment, as an additional tool for computer input or output.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article

David J. Bertuca

Increased demands on catalogers to increase productivity, while maintaining quality and accuracy, can be difficult to meet, and may even be hazardous to their health. OCLC…

Abstract

Increased demands on catalogers to increase productivity, while maintaining quality and accuracy, can be difficult to meet, and may even be hazardous to their health. OCLC Passport for Windows (PFW) and CatME provide some ability to create macros and shortcuts to speed cataloging activities, but do not solve the problems created by long work sessions. Voice recognition software, which works with most applications, is an effective way to input commands and data accurately into a computer. The software can be customized to provide single word input of complex commands, allowing the cataloger to concentrate more on the content of their records, rather than the input. This type of software is helpful not only to workers with repetitive strain injury (RSI) or physical disabilities, but also to anyone requiring accurate input during extended work sessions. This article explains how the software works, offers examples, and provides tips on working with using voice recognition.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article

Susan Jennifer Ni Chuileann and Jean Quigley

This paper assesses the ability of the minimally verbal child with autism to recognise their own voice. The rationale for this study rests in recent advances in technology…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper assesses the ability of the minimally verbal child with autism to recognise their own voice. The rationale for this study rests in recent advances in technology aimed at making the voice of speech generating devices (SGDs) sound more like the child using them (van Santen and Black, 2009). The purpose of this paper is to investigate the child’s ability to actually recognise the sound of their own voice in a series of short experiments using computer-based methodology.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a voice-face matching computerised paradigm, the performance of 33 children with autism was compared to that of 27 children with developmental delay (DD), and 33 typically developing (TD) children. The children were matched for verbal and non-verbal ability and a training period was conducted prior to the main test to ensure children’s understanding of what was expected of them.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest that the child with autism recognise the sound of their own voice at test, but with much greater difficulty than age-and-ability matched comparison groups. The implications of this finding are useful for researchers in the field of speech mimicry technology and manufacturers of SGD software packages. The paper also provides empirical insights about how the child with autism may process voice in their everyday social interactions.

Research limitations/implications

Some limitations to this study exist, for instance, there were only a small number of presentations involving self-voice in this task. This may have over simplified the process for the young TD children and the children with DD. Nevertheless, it is striking that despite being matched for non-verbal mental age, the children with autism performed significantly less well than either of the other two groups of children. However, future studies would benefit from adjusting the number of presentations of voice and face accordingly. It is also important to note that for some children with autism the simultaneous presentation of faces and voices may act more as an interference effect (Cook and Wilding, 1997; Joassin et al., 2004) than a facilitation effect (Molholm et al., 2002). Future studies may wish to test a subgroup on voice recognition without the aid of visual prompts.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for the type of voice children with autism may prefer to use when communicating via a SGD. The authors suggest that if the child does not recognise or prefer the sound of their own natural voice on such devices, partial or complete abandonment of the SGD may occur.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to research how children’s abilities and preferences can be taken into account at the point of decision making for particular communication tools.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article

Sunhee Kim, Yumi Hwang, Daejin Shin, Chang-Yeal Yang, Seung-Yeun Lee, Jin Kim, Byunggoo Kong, Jio Chung, Namhyun Cho, Ji-Hwan Kim and Minhwa Chung

This paper describes the development process of a mobile Voice User Interface (VUI) for Korean users with dysarthria with currently available speech recognition technology…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes the development process of a mobile Voice User Interface (VUI) for Korean users with dysarthria with currently available speech recognition technology by conducting systematic user needs analysis and applying usability testing feedback to prototype system designs.

Design/methodology/approach

Four usability surveys are conducted for the development of the prototype system. According to the two surveys on user needs and user experiences with existing VUI systems at the stage of the prototype design, the target platforms, and target applications are determined. Furthermore, a set of basic words is selected by the prospective users, which enables the system to be not only custom designed for dysarthric speakers but also individualized for each user. Reflecting the requests relating to general usage of the VUI and the UI design preference of users through evaluation of the initial prototype, we develop the final prototype, which is an individualized voice keyboard for mobile devices based on an isolated word recognition engine with word prediction.

Findings

The results of this paper show that target user participation in system development is effective for improving usability and satisfaction of the system, as the system is developed considering various ideas and feedback obtained in each development stage from different prospective users.

Originality/value

We have developed an automatic speech recognition-based mobile VUI system not only custom designed for dysarthric speakers but also individualized for each user, focussing on the usability aspect through four usability surveys. This voice keyboard system has the potential to be an assistive and alternative input method for people with speech impairment, including mild to moderate dysarthria, and people with physical disabilities.

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Article

Adrialdo Azanha, Mauro Vivaldini, Silvio R.I. Pires and João Batista de Camargo Junior

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse the difficulties encountered in the implementation of a voice picking system at a large multinational company of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse the difficulties encountered in the implementation of a voice picking system at a large multinational company of the tractor industrial segment, outlining a comparison related to the main critical factors concerning the system implementation at a Brazilian and a USA plant.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology utilised was qualitative and exploratory conducted through case studies in the two plants of the multinational company. The main data were collected through interviews with key managers directly involved in the project of voice picking system implementation.

Findings

The results indicate that the picking processes in the two plants were similar, since both were designed for the production line and conducted using bar-code readers and paper lists. Nevertheless, the internal warehousing process in the USA was more mature and computerised, whereas the Brazilian process still had opportunity for improvement, such as, the visual storage process, where the operator was responsible for locating an empty position.

Research limitations/implications

Since this research is an exploratory case study, its results cannot be generalised.

Practical implications

The paper provides relevant practical information and experiences to managers interested in implementing voice picking systems, as well as interested in improving the accuracy and productivity of logistics processes within warehouses.

Originality/value

The voice picking systems are more widespread in the USA than in Brazil, and therefore, companies around the world can use this studied case to better understand about the voice picking systems implementation process in both emerging and mature marketplaces.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 65 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article

There are believed to be something in the region of 250 different speech recognition systems available worldwide. This brief review, together with the articles on two…

Abstract

There are believed to be something in the region of 250 different speech recognition systems available worldwide. This brief review, together with the articles on two British connected speech systems and the report on the Japanese scene, can do no more than give a taste of what is currently available in Britain.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article

Juline E. Mills, Matthew Meyers and Sookeun Byun

The purpose of this paper is to review viable biometric technologies and examine their applicability in the hospitality and tourism businesses.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review viable biometric technologies and examine their applicability in the hospitality and tourism businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the different types of biometrics in the market with their advantages and disadvantages are reviewed, followed by a discussion of current applications within the hospitality and tourism sector.

Findings

Potential business impacts of biometrics are identified such as increased consumer convenience, operational efficiency, and security. Meanwhile, despite its great benefits, consumers' privacy concerns that are raised during biometric data collection and management processes may keep the technology from realizing its full potential.

Research limitations/implications

The paper only presents a glimpse of what may be done with the technology, as the potential extent of its usage is bound only by management's imagination while the possibilities that the technology brings to industry may be numerous.

Practical implications

Hospitality and tourism companies must have clear goals and logical approaches for usage and implementation of biometric technologies. They also need to be acutely aware of any privacy, guest perceptions, attitude towards, and trust factors that may surround the usage of biometric technologies. Moreover, corporate responsibility and ethical usage of the information obtained from biometrics may influence guest willingness to use the technology.

Originality/value

The paper has value in that there has been a lack of research on the impact of biometrics on the service industry, as well as user concerns towards the technology, rather than system development.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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