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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Cailing Feng, Mulyadi Robin, Lisan Fan and Xiaoyu Huang

Commitment to change is vital for the success of any organizational change initiative. However, despite a sustained increase in research interest on employees’ commitment

Abstract

Purpose

Commitment to change is vital for the success of any organizational change initiative. However, despite a sustained increase in research interest on employees’ commitment to change, there is still no consistency about the unidimensional or multi-dimensional construct of commitment to change, and previous research tends to ignore the impact vocational drivers may have on it. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on prospect theory, the authors extended Herscovitch and Meyer’s (2002) commitment to change construct by developing and testing an additional dimension of commitment to change centered on employees’ vocational commitment across two studies, adopting a longitudinal design within a Chinese context. As organizational change often has implications that impacts individual decision making, vocational development and work adjustments and attitudes within the workplace, the authors presented the case for vocational commitment to change as an important extension to the commitment to change literature. The authors first provided evidence for the internal consistency, factor structure and the validity of the commitment to change in the Chinese context. Subsequently, the authors examined the changes of employees’ commitment to change across time, and demonstrated its predictive validity by exploring the relationship between commitment to change and change-related behaviors.

Findings

The current research represents improvements in commitment to change measurement, provides construct clarification in the Asia context, and sheds light on theoretical and empirical evidence for how to support change in the Chinese context. Limitations, implications and directions for future research are further discussed.

Originality/value

The current study responds to a call for research to further investigate the mechanisms of commitment to change within non-Western contexts, specifically within the Chinese context. Through a rigorous scale development process, the authors clarified Herscovitch and Meyer’s (2002) commitment to change model and present an augmented model with a fourth dimension –vocational commitment to change. Furthermore, through a longitudinal study, the current study also demonstrates that the cultivation of commitment to change has great importance to improving employees’ change-supportive behavior and reducing their resistance to change. This is consistent with cross-cultural research, which shows that Chinese individuals are more likely to possess inconsistent attitudes toward an object, including themselves, compared to Western individuals (Spencer-Rodgers et al., 2004). The study also explained the change of commitment to change over time, showing the significant relationships among the commitment to change and change-related behaviors.

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

The purpose of the study was to develop and validate an integrative measure of commitment to change using a mixed-methods approach. Changes in employees' commitment to

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to develop and validate an integrative measure of commitment to change using a mixed-methods approach. Changes in employees' commitment to change over time were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a longitudinal study using participants in China. The researchers used a mixed-methods design.

Findings

Three hypotheses were supported: 1. Initial and later commitment to change were positively correlated 2. Commitment to change and change supportive behaviour was positively correlated 3. Initial commitment to change was negatively related to resistance to change.

Research limitations/implications

Construct clarification can be further examined across cultures to make its cross-cultural validity clearer. The research uses participants from a Chinese context and adds significantly to understanding of commitment to change in this culture.

Practical implications

Employers would do well to attend to the needs and interests of employees who have higher vocational commitment to change.

Originality/value

This research report gives data from participants from a Chinese cultural background which gives new information regarding vocational commitment to change and opens new areas for further research.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2003

Walter C Borman, Jerry W Hedge, Kerri L Ferstl, Jennifer D Kaufman, William L Farmer and Ronald M Bearden

This chapter provides a contemporary view of state-of-the science research and thinking done in the areas of selection and classification. It takes as a starting point the…

Abstract

This chapter provides a contemporary view of state-of-the science research and thinking done in the areas of selection and classification. It takes as a starting point the observation that the world of work is undergoing important changes that are likely to result in different occupational and organizational structures. In this context, we review recent research on criteria, especially models of job performance, followed by sections on predictors, including ability, personality, vocational interests, biodata, and situational judgment tests. The paper also discusses person-organization fit models, as alternatives or complements to the traditional person-job fit paradigm.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-174-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1988

Eric Frank

An attempt is made to illustrate the multi‐faceted and multifarious nature of human resource development worldwide, following a definition of it and a description of how…

Abstract

An attempt is made to illustrate the multi‐faceted and multifarious nature of human resource development worldwide, following a definition of it and a description of how it operates in a number of countries throughout the world, including the US, the EEC countries, India, Singapore, Japan, Australia and New Zealand. The roles and functions of HRD practitioners are examined, and the competences required listed. A short history of the International Federation of Training and Development Organisations is offered and a list of conferences described.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2020

Yilmaz Akgunduz and Seckin Eser

This empirical study explored how tourist incivility, job stress and job satisfaction affect tourist guides' vocational commitment.

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical study explored how tourist incivility, job stress and job satisfaction affect tourist guides' vocational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via a questionnaire on a convenience sample of tourist guides during February–March 2018. A total of 172 valid questionnaires were collected, of which 100 were online and 72 face-to-face. The hypotheses were tested through multiple regression analyses.

Findings

The results show that job stress reduces both the affective and normative commitment of tourist guides whereas tourist incivility only reduces their normative commitment. The results also show that job satisfaction increases their affective commitment.

Practical implications

The results show that vocational commitment of tourist guides can be strengthened when job stresses are reduced, they are faced with less incivil behaviors and job satisfaction increases. Tour operators and travel agency managers can implement managerial practices that will reduce the job stress of tourist guides and increase job satisfaction. At the same time, it can be ensured that tourist guides develop a positive attitude toward their profession by supporting the legalization and implementation of regulations that protect from incivil tourist behavior.

Originality/value

Although both job stress and job satisfaction have received past research attention, no research has studied them in an integrated form with tourist incivility and vocational commitments of tourist guides. In this study, it is predicted that tourist incivility and job stress both affect the job satisfaction and vocational commitment of tourist guides. Conducting such a study of tourist guiding is important because the literature survey reveals that only very limited research has been done into the work of this profession.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Fernando Marhuenda, Ignacio Martínez and Almudena Navas

This article investigates the formation of vocational identities of workers in the sector of tourism in the Czech Republic, Greece and Spain. Major challenges and…

Abstract

This article investigates the formation of vocational identities of workers in the sector of tourism in the Czech Republic, Greece and Spain. Major challenges and conflicts shape the sector of tourism as a particular labour space. Emerging issues relate to the need for diversifying the offer of services to face seasonality, strategies of entrepreneurial merging and demands for mobility and flexibility of the workforce. For the individual worker, a complex combination of related factors lead to tensions and contradictions, particularly in terms of changes in work organization, flexibility and how vocational identities of workers are shaped. An active policy for social dialogue and the improvement of working conditions seem to be vital in order to avoid flexibility becoming a synonym for precariousness of employment. Furthermore, the promotion of continuing training, greater recognition of formal vocational education and the development of an entrepreneurial culture are key elements that would enhance opportunities to develop a professional career in tourism.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Simone Kirpal

The contributions in this CDI special issue present research findings that have been generated in the course of the research project, Vocational Identity, Flexibility and…

Abstract

The contributions in this CDI special issue present research findings that have been generated in the course of the research project, Vocational Identity, Flexibility and Mobility in the European Labour Market, funded under the 5th EU Framework Programme. Investigating identity formation processes at work, the guiding research question focused on what individuals identify with in their work context when they are challenged to respond to increasing demands for flexibility, mobility, changing work settings and shifting skill requirements. Project partners from seven European countries (Czech Republic, Estonia, France, Germany, Greece, Spain and the UK) interviewed more than 500 employees at intermediate skills level and over 100 managers and representatives of human resources departments about how employees cope with changes at work and how this might affect their work identity, work attitude and career orientation. This paper gives an overview of the background, research questions, basic theoretical considerations, methodology and general findings of this project. It serves as a general introduction to the other five papers presented in this issue which are all based on a common approach and understanding of the research carried out.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Krista Loogma, Meril Ümarik and Raivo Vilu

Information technology (IT) is a new service sector characterised by an intensive dynamic that puts high demands of learning, flexibility and mobility on IT specialists…

Abstract

Information technology (IT) is a new service sector characterised by an intensive dynamic that puts high demands of learning, flexibility and mobility on IT specialists. This article identifies two features that are decisive for the formation of work identities of employees working in the sector: first, an “entrepreneurial” employment model that transfers responsibilities for skills acquisition, professional development and risk management to the individual; and second, a conflict between a strong identification with IT‐related technology and flexibility requirements. The article analyses the implications these features have in terms of the role of initial and continuing vocational training, skills demands and the professional development of employees working in the sector. It also discusses how boundaryless career paths, characterised by ambiguity and uncertainty, influence work‐related identities of IT specialists.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2010

Peter W. Hom, Frederick T.L. Leong and Juliya Golubovich

This chapter applies three of the most prominent theories in vocational and career psychology to further illuminate the turnover process. Prevailing theories about…

Abstract

This chapter applies three of the most prominent theories in vocational and career psychology to further illuminate the turnover process. Prevailing theories about attrition have rarely integrated explanatory constructs from vocational research, though career (and job) choices clearly have implications for employee affect and loyalty to a chosen job in a career field. Despite remarkable inroads by new perspectives for explaining turnover, career, and vocational formulations can nonetheless enrich these – and conventional – formulations about why incumbents stay or leave their jobs. To illustrate, vocational theories can help clarify why certain shocks (critical events precipitating thoughts of leaving) drive attrition and what embeds incumbents. In particular, this chapter reviews Super's life-span career theory, Holland's career model, and social cognitive career theory and describes how they can fill in theoretical gaps in the understanding of organizational withdrawal.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-126-9

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