Search results

1 – 1 of 1
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Vladimir Ponczek and Enlinson Mattos

The purpose of this paper is to decompose the effects of democracy and risk of expropriation on economic volatility.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to decompose the effects of democracy and risk of expropriation on economic volatility.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors follow Acemouglu et al. and use settler mortality in former colonies in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries as an instrument of “risk of expropriation,” in addition to a democracy index to capture institutional effects on economic stability.

Findings

The authors present empirical evidence that the economic performance of more centralized former European colonies is not more volatile than that of democratic ones, once the exogenous variation of expropriation risk across countries is included in the model

Originality/value

The paper investigates the role of a spectrum of different institutions on economic stability. In this sense, the paper contributes to the literature analyzing the effect of property‐rights protection, as measured by a risk‐of‐expropriation index, on the relation between democracy and economic stability.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

1 – 1 of 1