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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Vivien Martin

The developing emphasis in health and social care on working across traditional boundaries will demand different approaches to staff development. If we are to retain the…

Abstract

The developing emphasis in health and social care on working across traditional boundaries will demand different approaches to staff development. If we are to retain the strengths of expertise in the enormous number of areas represented in health and social care we will need to develop better ways of understanding each other in order to work together more effectively. This paper focuses on some of the issues raised in management development programmes which have multiple objectives demanding educational and developmental support. The emphasis is on identification of issues which arise in collaboration amongst those delivering a programme when they come from the different backgrounds of training and development, personal development and higher education. Some of the issues raised in partnership working between commissioning and providing organisations are also considered.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

Vivien Martin

Describes the range of issues considered in designing a programme ofeducation and development for NHS managers. The programme took the formof a certificate and diploma in…

Abstract

Describes the range of issues considered in designing a programme of education and development for NHS managers. The programme took the form of a certificate and diploma in management studies with a very work‐based approach using action learning sets and applied theory and techniques. Briefly discusses the recent history and debates in management education together with the tensions caused by academic focus on critical analysis and evaluation and the workplace focus of being effective and making improvements. This programme attempts to recognize and build on the strengths of both approaches and also to add some of the best practice from trainers′ experience of designing personal development plans. Discusses the emphasis on reflective learning and the use of research‐based assignments instead of conventional exams. Concludes with some indications of possible future developments from this model.

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2009

Vivien Caughley

Hannah King occupies a unique place in missionary and colonial history, the history of education, cross‐cultural relations and material culture in New Zealand. She was the…

Abstract

Hannah King occupies a unique place in missionary and colonial history, the history of education, cross‐cultural relations and material culture in New Zealand. She was the only woman from the first 1814 Missionary settlement of the Church Missionary Society (CMS) in New Zealand to remain in New Zealand for the rest of her life, yet she does not have an entry in the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography, and is rarely indexed in either New Zealand’s general historical works or even works more specifically related to the Missionary era. John and Hannah King were one of three artisan missionary couples who sailed with the Revd Samuel Marsden on his ship, the missionary brig ‘Active’, from Port Jackson, Australia to Rangihoua, in the Bay of Islands, in late 1814. Marsden’s 1814 Christmas Day service on the beach at Rangihoua is recognised as the beginning of missionary activity and planned European settlement on New Zealand soil.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2014

Martin Loosemore, Vivien Chow and Denny McGeorge

A predicted increase in climate change-related extreme weather events will present hospitals with new health-related and physical risks which were not originally…

Abstract

Purpose

A predicted increase in climate change-related extreme weather events will present hospitals with new health-related and physical risks which were not originally anticipated in building and infrastructure designs. Markus et al.'s building systems model is used to analyse a range of adaptive strategies to cope with such events. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus group interviews were conducted with a wide range of hospital stakeholders across three case study hospitals in Australia and New Zealand which have experienced extreme weather events.

Findings

It is concluded that effective adaptive strategies must balance responses across different organisational sub-systems. Contrary to previous research, the findings indicate that hospital managers do see hospital infrastructure as an important component of disaster response. However, it is the least adaptable of all response subsystems, making other options more attractive in the heat of a crisis.

Research limitations/implications

A focus on three case studies allowed the researchers to explore in-depth the experiences of stakeholders who had experienced extreme weather events. While producing highly valid results, the inherent limitation of this approach is the lack of breath. So further case studies are needed to generalise from the results.

Practical implications

Recommendations are made to improve the adaptive capacity of healthcare facilities to cope with the future health challenges of climate change risk.

Originality/value

By acknowledging that no one group holds all the knowledge to deal with extreme weather events, this paper capture the collective knowledge of all key stakeholders who have a stake in the process of responding effectively to such an event. It shows that hospital adaptation strategies cannot be considered in isolation from the surrounding emergency management systems in which a hospital is imbedded.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2017

Anna Sinell, Vivien Iffländer and Antonia Muschner

Successful knowledge and technology transfer (KTT) is necessary to ensure the competitiveness and growth of national innovation systems. In this regard, technology…

Abstract

Purpose

Successful knowledge and technology transfer (KTT) is necessary to ensure the competitiveness and growth of national innovation systems. In this regard, technology transfer offices (TTOs) are becoming indispensable in their capacity as intermediaries between science, policy, industry, and the public. The purpose of this paper is to examine the strategies and operations of particularly productive transfer offices in five different countries in order to account for the high levels of transfer activity.

Design/methodology/approach

To this end, the authors interviewed 34 senior KTT managers in these offices. The collected protocols were analysed in three phases. First, the authors extracted and organised the key characteristics of the transfer practices by applying rigorous method of open-end, qualitative content analysis. The authors then enhanced the thus gathered descriptive statistics and ultimately developed a transfer office typology by building on the concept of attribute space.

Findings

The analysis suggests two ideal types of transfer offices, distinguishable in terms of their intertwined characteristics such as their goals, practices, sources of income, and positions within their associated organisations. While the primarily state-funded common good type would seek benefits to the public, the self-financed entrepreneurial type would pursue commercial success. The former would therefore create opportunities for disseminating knowledge and strengthening the local innovation ecosystem, while the latter would scout for promising ideas and cultivate relationships with industry.

Originality/value

The goal was to uncover the individual characteristics of the offices under study, and the relationships between these characteristics, that can help explain these offices’ exceptional productivity. This study is the first to propose a TTO typology, which can support interorganisational and international transfer collaboration. The findings provide empirical evidence for the theoretical Quadruple Helix model of the innovation system and have implications for research and practice.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Abstract

Details

Knowledge Risk and its Mitigation: Practices and Cases
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-919-0

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Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Abstract

Details

Universities and Entrepreneurship: Meeting the Educational and Social Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-074-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1966

LOUGHBOROUGH was the first of the post‐war schools to be established in 1946. This resulted from negotiations of representatives of the Library Association Council with…

Abstract

LOUGHBOROUGH was the first of the post‐war schools to be established in 1946. This resulted from negotiations of representatives of the Library Association Council with technical and other colleges which followed their failure to secure facilities within the universities on the terms of the L.A. remaining the sole certificating body. The late Dr. Herbert Schofield accepted their terms and added a library school to already varied fields of training within his college.

Details

New Library World, vol. 67 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Abstract

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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