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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Vivek V. Jog and Senthil Murugan T.

Due to the connectivity of the multiple devices and the systems on the same network, rapid development has become possible in Internet of Things (IoTs) for the last…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the connectivity of the multiple devices and the systems on the same network, rapid development has become possible in Internet of Things (IoTs) for the last decade. But, IoT is mostly affected with severe security challenges due to the potential vulnerabilities happened through the multiple connectivity of sensors, devices and system. In order to handle the security challenges, literature presents a handful of security protocols for IoT. The purpose of this paper is to present a threat profiling and elliptic curve cryptography (ECC)-based mutual and multi-level authentication for the security of IoTs. This work contains two security attributes like memory and machine-related attributes for maintaining the profile table. Also, the profile table stores the value after encrypting the value with ECC to avoid storage resilience using the proposed protocol. Furthermore, three entities like, IoT device, server and authorization centre (AC) performs the verification based on seven levels mutually to provide the resilience against most of the widely accepted attacks. Finally, DPWSim is utilized for simulation of IoT and verification of proposed protocol to show that the protocol is secure against passive and active attacks.

Design/methodology/approach

In this work, the authors have presented a threat profiling and ECC-based mutual and multi-level authentication for the security of IoTs. This work contains two security attributes like memory and machine-related attributes for maintaining the profile table. Also, the profile table stores the value after encrypting the value with ECC to avoid storage resilience using the proposed protocol. Furthermore, three entities like, IoT device, server and AC performs the verification based on seven levels mutually to provide the resilience against most of the widely accepted attacks.

Findings

DPWSim is utilized for simulation of IoT and verification of the proposed protocol to show that this protocol is secure against passive and active attacks. Also, attack analysis is carried out to prove the robustness of the proposed protocol against the password guessing attack, impersonation attack, server spoofing attack, stolen verifier attack and reply attack.

Originality/value

This paper presents a threat profiling and ECC-based mutual and multi-level authentication for the security of IoTs.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-378X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2007

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2020

Michael Rogerson, Andrew Crane, Vivek Soundararajan, Johanne Grosvold and Charles H. Cho

This paper investigates how organisations are responding to mandatory modern slavery disclosure legislation. Experimentalist governance suggests that organisations faced…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates how organisations are responding to mandatory modern slavery disclosure legislation. Experimentalist governance suggests that organisations faced with disclosure requirements such as those contained in the UK Modern Slavery Act 2015 will compete with one another, and in doing so, improve compliance. The authors seek to understand whether this is the case.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is set in the UK public sector. The authors conduct interviews with over 25% of UK universities that are within the scope of the UK Modern Slavery Act 2015 and examine their reporting and disclosure under that legislation.

Findings

The authors find that, contrary to the logic of experimentalist governance, universities' disclosures as reflected in their modern slavery statements are persistently poor on detail, lack variation and have led to little meaningful action to tackle modern slavery. They show that this is due to a herding effect that results in universities responding as a sector rather than independently; a built-in incapacity to effectively manage supply chains; and insufficient attention to the issue at the board level. The authors also identity important boundary conditions of experimentalist governance.

Research limitations/implications

The generalisability of the authors’ findings is restricted to the public sector.

Practical implications

In contexts where disclosure under the UK Modern Slavery Act 2015 is not a core offering of the sector, and where competition is limited, there is little incentive to engage in a “race to the top” in terms of disclosure. As such, pro-forma compliance prevails and the effectiveness of disclosure as a tool to drive change in supply chains to safeguard workers is relatively ineffective. Instead, organisations must develop better knowledge of their supply chains and executives and a more critical eye for modern slavery to be combatted effectively. Accountants and their systems and skills can facilitate this development.

Originality/value

This is the first investigation of the organisational processes and activities which underpin disclosures related to modern slavery disclosure legislation. This paper contributes to the accounting and disclosure modern slavery literature by investigating public sector organisations' processes, activities and responses to mandatory reporting legislation on modern slavery.

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