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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

Zahra Alvandi Poor, Mahdieh Mirzabeigi and Majid Nabavi

The purpose of this study aims to identify the impact of verbal-visual cognitive styles on the level of satisfaction and behavior in the textual and content search of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study aims to identify the impact of verbal-visual cognitive styles on the level of satisfaction and behavior in the textual and content search of Google Images.

Design/methodology/approach

“Riding” cognitive style test and satisfaction questionnaire were used as data collection tools. Also, to collect data related to the image search behavior, the subjects’ transaction files were recorded using Camtasia software and then the files observed and reviewed. The research sample was 90 postgraduate students of Shiraz University.

Findings

The results showed that cognitive styles in interaction with the text-based and content-based search system of “Google Images” affected user’s satisfaction. Text-based image retrieval, in which vocabulary-based information needs were expressed, was more compatible with the verbal cognitive style and resulted in greater satisfaction. In contrast, in content-based image retrieval, where it was possible to express information needs in the form of images, users were more satisfied with the visual cognitive style. Verbal users performed more positively in text-based search and visual users in content-based search.

Originality/value

Considering the research gap, which has identified the performance of visual text-based and content-based systems in terms of satisfaction and cognitive style search behavior, the present study could be considered a small effort to promote science.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Juanjuan Wu, Hae Won Ju, Jieun Kim, Cara Damminga, Hye-Young Kim and Kim K.P. Johnson

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of three virtual fashion stores using product display methods dominant by colour, visual texture and style

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5772

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of three virtual fashion stores using product display methods dominant by colour, visual texture and style coordination on consumers' retailer interest, retail pleasure, perception of merchandise quality, patronage intention, and purchase behaviour to provide empirically tested, actionable product display methods to visual merchandising researchers and practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used mixed methods for this exploratory study, combining experimental and focus group methods to gather data. For the experiment, data were collected via a between-subjects design reflecting manipulation of three variables (i.e. colour, style coordination, visual texture). After the experiment, participants completed a self-administered online questionnaire. A segment of the participants also participated in focus group discussions of the virtual stores.

Findings

Participants who shopped in the style coordination store spent significantly more money than those who shopped in colour or visual texture stores. Participants who shopped in the colour store experienced significantly more retail pleasure and showed significantly higher patronage intention than those who shopped in the visual texture and style coordination stores; and they showed more retailer interest than subjects in the visual texture store. Retail pleasure and interest were found to mediate the link between methods of product display and patronage intention. Participants' fashion involvement moderated the relationship between fashion product display methods and retail interest.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first to create three virtual stores featuring product display methods dominant by colour, visual texture, and style coordination using 3D technology – a Mockshop software package. The effect of these different display methods on shoppers' reactions and responses was tested, which provided actionable results for visual merchandising practitioners, not only in the physical but also in the virtual store environment.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 41 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Hayward P. Andres and Obasi H. Akan

The purpose of this paper is to determine if “fit” and “non-fit” between authoritarian versus demonstrator teaching and visual versus verbal learning preferences differ in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine if “fit” and “non-fit” between authoritarian versus demonstrator teaching and visual versus verbal learning preferences differ in impact on Chinese MBA student academic performance in a large local urban Chinese university setting. In addition, the role of Chinese cultural behavioral tendencies in dictating specific teaching and learning style preferences among Chinese MBA students is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Subjects were 135 Chinese MBA students that indicated their learning style preference (verbal or visual) and predominant teaching style encountered (authoritarian or demonstrator). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) main effects were used to identify the best teaching style and best learning style. ANOVA interaction effects were used to test the meshing hypothesis (i.e. teaching-learning style “fit” versus “non-fit” conditions).

Findings

The results provided support for the mesh hypothesis – teaching style – learning style fit does matter. In general, authoritarian teaching was superior to demonstrator, and verbal learning was superior to visual. Findings also suggest that the demonstrator teaching style may better handle different learning styles (e.g. both verbal and visual) simultaneously as compared to the classic authoritarian teaching style.

Research limitations/implications

The findings support and contribute to the body of knowledge about the mesh hypothesis and provide the foundations for further longitudinal studies evaluating teaching and learning styles learning styles in a multicultural and cross-cultural context. A limitation of the study is that self-report responses were used and the data were collected at one Chinese university.

Practical implications

The results suggest that instructors are likely to reach only a selected few students if it is assumed that all students learn in the same way or based on cultural orientation alone. University administrators should be aware of the role of cultural tendencies related to teaching and learning and how cross-cultural communication and multicultural awareness can provide insights into strategies for social and academic integration of foreign students.

Originality/value

To date, the meshing hypothesis has received far less theoretical or empirical attention than the general learning style and teaching style hypotheses. This study addresses that gap.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

William A. Drago and Richard J. Wagner

It has become evident that students have diverse preferred learning styles and effective instructors must design and deliver courses to meet the needs of those students…

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12657

Abstract

It has become evident that students have diverse preferred learning styles and effective instructors must design and deliver courses to meet the needs of those students. This study investigates the four physiological learning styles of visual, aural, read‐write and kinesthetic as they apply to online education. Findings suggest that online students are more likely to have stronger visual and read‐write learning styles. Further, read‐write learners and students that were strong across all four learning styles were likely to evaluate course effectiveness lower than other students while aural/readwrite learners and students that were not strong on any learning style were more likely to evaluate course effectiveness higher than other students.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

James Poon Teng Fatt

Learning styles have gained awareness in managerial circles. The learning styles of accountancy students in tertiary institutions cannot be overlooked as they can enable…

Abstract

Learning styles have gained awareness in managerial circles. The learning styles of accountancy students in tertiary institutions cannot be overlooked as they can enable educators to structure their accountancy curricula and teaching methods to maximise learning. A survey on the learning styles of 71 accountancy students in the Nanyang Technological University was conducted. The students were found to be convergent and analytical in thinking, kinesthetic, and reflective in problem solving. The implications of the results will be discussed.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Yvette James‐Gordon and Jay Bal

An investigation was conducted in the design department of a medium‐sized automotive company to establish engineers’ preferred learning styles. This was achieved by using…

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2850

Abstract

An investigation was conducted in the design department of a medium‐sized automotive company to establish engineers’ preferred learning styles. This was achieved by using two proven questionnaires followed by statistical analysis methods. The evidence showed that the engineers investigated have a significant visual learning style preference. This means that their learning is more effective by using diagrams, sketches, photographs, schematics, flow charts, pictures, videos, computer graphics, and demonstrations in training programmes and in their everyday working environment. The present computer‐aided design (CAD) training in the company does incorporate some of these visual techniques and so does satisfy the engineers’ visual learning style preference. Evidence also suggested that there is not a need to have different training and learning methods for design engineers and for managerial engineers such as project engineers and team leaders.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2009

Tofi Rahal and David Palfreyman

Learning styles based education is becoming influential at higher education institutions around the world. Learning styles are characteristics of how students prefer to…

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21

Abstract

Learning styles based education is becoming influential at higher education institutions around the world. Learning styles are characteristics of how students prefer to learn; they draw their origin from both biological and experiential conditions that make each student unique in the way he/she learns. An important first step in improving learning is to identify or assess students’ learning styles, and there are several instruments that can be used for this purpose. This is necessary for teachers and students who wish to improve learning and study strategies. Students who perform poorly in a conventional educational setting may suffer from a mismatch of learning and teaching styles; for example kinesthetic learners may not adapt to learning by listening or by reading. When we teach tactual and/or kinesthetic students by talking, they focus for only a brief amount of time and then wander off into their own thoughts and quickly forget (Burke & Dunn, 2002). We can improve students’ academic performance by providing them with alternative strategies and activities that respond to their learning style needs (Dunn & Dunn, 1993). In spring 2008, the learning styles of over 700 Zayed University students were assessed using the BE (Building Excellence) survey developed by Rundle & Dunn. The data collected is being analyzed with a view to making recommendations for teachers, students and parents to improve students’ learning. This paper represents the first in a series of publications on this subject; it reviews the survey process, and focuses on the nature and learning preferences of ZU students in perceptual elements (e.g. visual, auditory) and cognitive elements (e.g. Analytic-sequential (left-brain) vs. Global-simultaneous (right-brain) preferences).

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2018

Emelie Havemo

Disclosure research has argued that visuals are increasingly used in annual reports as a way to increase readability of the annual report, but comparatively little is…

Abstract

Purpose

Disclosure research has argued that visuals are increasingly used in annual reports as a way to increase readability of the annual report, but comparatively little is known about of diagrams compared to graphs and photographs. The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical account of visuals use in corporate disclosure, with an emphasis on diagrams, to show changes from the 1940s until present-day reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

Visual research methods were applied to analyze how diagrams, photographs and graphs were used in 69 annual reports of the Swedish telecom company Ericsson.

Findings

Photographs have been used with increasing frequency since the 1950s. Graph and diagram use has increased significantly since the 1990s while photograph use remained stable, suggesting that graphs and diagrams increasingly complement photographs for visually representing the organization in corporate disclosure. Factors explaining the case company’s development include both internal (performance, individual preferences, shifting from a manufacturing-based strategy to a service-based strategy) and external (legislation, transformation of the telecom industry).

Originality/value

Visual elements in annual reports are increasingly oriented toward immaterial representations of the organization’s standings and identity and diagrams are increasingly used and contribute to this. This finding motivates further research about diagram use in corporate communication, such as how different diagram types convey accounting messages, and whether diagrams serve as impression management devices. For regulators, it will be important to follow the emerging trend of diagram use, since it is becoming part of reporting practice.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2017

Candace Jones and Silviya Svejenova

City identity is a distinct form of collective identity based on the perceived uniqueness and meanings of place, rather than group category and membership. A city’s…

Abstract

City identity is a distinct form of collective identity based on the perceived uniqueness and meanings of place, rather than group category and membership. A city’s identity is constructed over time through architecture, which involves three sign systems – material, visual, and rhetorical – and multiple institutional actors to communicate the city’s distinctiveness and identity. We compare Barcelona and Boston to examine the identity and meaning created and communicated by different groups of professionals, such as architects, city planners, international guide book writers, and local cultural critics, who perform the semiotic work of ­constructing city identity.

Details

Multimodality, Meaning, and Institutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-332-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1993

James Poon Teng Fatt

Today, learning styles have gained awareness in managerial circles.To trainers, a knowledge of learning styles can help to structure theirprogrammes and teaching methods…

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2987

Abstract

Today, learning styles have gained awareness in managerial circles. To trainers, a knowledge of learning styles can help to structure their programmes and teaching methods to maximize learning. Focuses on the learning styles of learners. The aim is to understand from the heterogeneous mix of learners′ learning styles the group learning style so that trainers can best adapt their teaching style and materials to suit the learners′ group learning style. A discussion of the learning style inventory, learning styles, teaching style, and course design, follows.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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