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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

John Lidstone

Field sales managers are judged by the combined sales produced by their teams. During the course of any one year, individual appraisals will reveal that sales teams have…

Abstract

Field sales managers are judged by the combined sales produced by their teams. During the course of any one year, individual appraisals will reveal that sales teams have some common training needs or weaknesses. These may range from company/competitor product knowledge, a selling technique such as closing or an aspect of their work organisation. When this occurs, there are two choices. You can plan and carry out a programme of training on an individual basis for each salesperson. This will take time and it may be felt that immediate action is needed to correct this common weakness. A more speedy and effective solution might be to bring the sales team together and conduct a group training meeting. In most companies employing large and small sales forces, local training meetings held on a regular basis are commonplace. It has been estimated that more than 10,000 internal sales meetings are held in the British Isles alone every week.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Clifton P. Campbell

Instructional materials enhance the teaching/learning process by exhibiting information necessary to acquire knowledge and skills. Focuses on printed forms of…

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1370

Abstract

Instructional materials enhance the teaching/learning process by exhibiting information necessary to acquire knowledge and skills. Focuses on printed forms of instructional materials and provides detailed information, including examples, on five types of job performance aids, three types of instruction sheets, and two types of modules. Checklists of considerations that affect the quality of finished products are also provided. Job performance aids (JPAs)provide procedural or factual guidance in the performance of tasks. They store essential details in a variety of functional forms for use just before or during task performance. Research shows that JPAs are a cost‐effective supplement or alternative to training. They reduce the time needed to master task performance and facilitate the transfer of learning from the training setting to the job. Instruction sheets assure that all trainees have the same complete and accurate information for performing practical work and for completing assignments. These sheets also help manage large groups of trainees with diverse abilities who are working simultaneously at several different tasks. Modules are carefully structured documents which facilitate self‐directed and self‐paced learning. While their components may vary, modules typically include learning objectives, an introduction, instructional content, directions, learning activities, and test questions with feedback answers. With modules, trainees assume personal responsibility for their progress. Regardless of the care used in their preparation, all types of instructional materials must be evaluated prior to general use. Presents a comprehensive quality control procedure for confirming effectiveness and value. This was prepared to enhance both formal classroom instruction and individual study. Figures, tables, checklists, appendices, and a glossary of keywords and terms, supplement the text in explaining the content.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1972

A. TREBBLE

An account of the present ‘state of the art’ of the librarianship of non‐book materials must begin with a note on terminology. ‘Audiovisual materials’, ‘non‐print items’…

Abstract

An account of the present ‘state of the art’ of the librarianship of non‐book materials must begin with a note on terminology. ‘Audiovisual materials’, ‘non‐print items’, and more imaginatively, ‘metabooks’, are some attempts at a collective description of film materials, sound recordings, and pictures of all kinds. The National Council for Educational Technology (NCET) favour ‘non‐book materials’, abbreviated to NBM. ‘One day, perhaps, the word “document” will be commonly accepted as connoting simply an embodiment of evidence, whether it be in print or pictures or whatever, and we shall take for granted that arrangements for the handling of documents should make provision as a matter of course for all media. In the meantime, the case must not be overlooked, and as an expression “non‐book material” is probably no more offensive and no less apt than its several rivals. “Non‐print document” is perhaps more accurate but is not yet in common use.’ I have adopted NBM.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Mahdi Borzooei and Maryam Asgari

The purpose of this study is to explore the perceptions of Muslim consumers on the Islamic Chamber Research & Information Center (ICRIC) Halal logo. In particular, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the perceptions of Muslim consumers on the Islamic Chamber Research & Information Center (ICRIC) Halal logo. In particular, the paper evaluates the main messages of the logo and describes the organization’s characteristics behind this logo.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory research conducts a semi-structured interview with visual aids method to identify the Malay Muslim’s perceptions toward the ICRIC Halal logo.

Findings

Results of the study indicate that the word “Halal” in Arabic characters is a very strong visual and emotional element of the logo because it is eye-catching and projects a strong image of credibility and trustworthiness. Using Islamic graphical design in a Halal logo can assist businesses to succeed in the marketplace. Simplicity, appropriate font type and size, suitable colors and total harmony of all elements make a Halal logo attractive and meaningful; the logo signals trust and mirrors the values of the organization.

Research limitations/implications

This research used a qualitative research approach to analyze the perceptions of 25 Malay Muslim students.

Practical implications

Practical implications of this study provide a new window for all Halal certification bodies to realize the importance of the different elements of the Halal logo.

Social implications

This research attempts to introduce a unique Halal logo that is approved by 57 Muslim countries. This unity assists religious consumers with various mathahib to purchase Halal products with confidence.

Originality/value

This pioneer study explores the Muslim consumers’ perceptions of a specific Halal logo in the marketplace.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

This special issue contains selected extracts from Marketing and Selling Bank Services, a learning resource from MCB University Press designed to help practising bank…

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1443

Abstract

This special issue contains selected extracts from Marketing and Selling Bank Services, a learning resource from MCB University Press designed to help practising bank managers to refine and apply bank marketing skills. Competition in financial services is growing and an organisation's ability to market and sell its services is essential for success. Marketing, marketing channels, service levels, pricing, communication with customers, persuading the customer, creating an effective salesforce, interviewing the customer, and international banking are all aspects that are discussed. Suggestions for action are made to enable a manager to put into effect some of the ideas presented.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1986

Scott Inglis and Joanna Kozubska

Making presentations is a task undertaken by most managers, yet relished by few. In this excerpt from the The Communications Portfolio, published by MCB University Press…

Abstract

Making presentations is a task undertaken by most managers, yet relished by few. In this excerpt from the The Communications Portfolio, published by MCB University Press, Books, Courseware and Resources Division, the skills and techniques of making presentations effectively are outlined.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Nikki Ashcraft

As new English-medium universities open their doors in the Arabian Gulf andsome Arabic-medium universities switch to using English as the language ofinstruction…

Abstract

As new English-medium universities open their doors in the Arabian Gulf andsome Arabic-medium universities switch to using English as the language ofinstruction, instructors in all disciplines face the challenge of teaching theircourses in English to students who have learned (and who are continuing tolearn) English as a foreign language. This article reviews theories and practicesfrom the field of Applied Linguistics and Teaching English as a SecondLanguage (TESOL) which can help content-area instructors understand andreach these learners.

Second language acquisition research has produced several concepts ofinterest to content-area instructors. Krashen’s theory of comprehensible inputfocuses on the language used by the instructor, while Swain’s of comprehensibleoutput emphasizes providing opportunities for students to produce language. Cummins differentiates between two types of language proficiency: BasicInterpersonal Communication Skills (BICS), which are needed for dailyinteractions, and Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP), which isrequired for academic tasks. Interlanguage and first language interference mayalso influence students’ second language production in classroom settings.

Specific classroom practices for improving students’ language comprehensionand facilitating content learning are recommended. These include modifyingspeech, using visual aids, utilizing a variety of questioning techniques, andextending the time instructors wait for students to respond. Instructors canemploy strategies, such as mind-mapping and quickwriting, to activate students’linguistic and conceptual schemata at the beginning of a lesson. Scaffoldingprovides structure and support for students to complete tasks until they are ableto realize them on their own. Collaborative/cooperative learning lowers students’affective filters and offers opportunities for participation and language practice. Graphics illustrate some of the suggested practices.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1996

Clifton P. Campbell

Research and experience have shown that job performance aids (JPAs) are a cost‐effective alternative or supplement to training. Based on job and task analysis information…

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4419

Abstract

Research and experience have shown that job performance aids (JPAs) are a cost‐effective alternative or supplement to training. Based on job and task analysis information, they store essential details on performance in a variety of functional and durable forms for use just before or during task performance. Although most JPAs are in printed (hard copy) form, a series of illustrations or directions on an audio or video tape as well as information on a computer screen are also JPAs when they reduce the amount of information to be remembered, specify what actions to take, and indicate when to take each action. The five basic types of JPAs are procedural guide, worksheet, checklist, decision table and flowchart. Describes each type and provides preparation guidelines, along with examples. Also presents important information on layout and format, including the use of illustrations and how to provide emphasis, as well as on effective writing. A comprehensive four‐step quality control procedure describes how the effectiveness and value of JPAs can be confirmed.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Pauline Iroeze and Comfort N. Owate

Application of Industry 4.0 in the library is still exploratory and despite an increase research on the rising trend, many challenges remain in designing a more packaged…

Abstract

Application of Industry 4.0 in the library is still exploratory and despite an increase research on the rising trend, many challenges remain in designing a more packaged and accessible information using industry 4.0 components, especially for the special need library users such as the visually impaired, auditory impaired, wheel chair bound among others. Existing research, tends to focus on how special need library users can utilize information services using the third industrial revolution components. However there is very slim evidence that researchers have approached the issue of how industry 4.0 can be impactful on special need library users. This chapter tries to provide an overview of how special need library users can be supported to access and utilize library services effortlessly using industry 4.0 components like IOT services, cyber-physical systems, and cloud computing.

Details

Examining the impact of industry 4.0 on academic libraries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-656-5

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1962

MORE than 200 delegates and observers from sixteen countries attended the International Federation of Airline Pilots' Associations (I.F.A.L.P.A.) Symposium on all weather…

Abstract

MORE than 200 delegates and observers from sixteen countries attended the International Federation of Airline Pilots' Associations (I.F.A.L.P.A.) Symposium on all weather landing, at the Hilton Hotel in Amsterdam from October 17 to 19, 1962. The Symposium, which was opened by Prince Bernhardt of the Netherlands, heard presentations from a considerable proportion of the equipment manufacturers in the automatic landing field, covering the current state of their system development and testing. More than half of the symposium was allotted to discussion and many of the pilots present expressed their opinions. The dominant theme of the discussion, naturally enough, was the proper place of the pilot in the all weather landing operation. This aspect of the operation is probably now the most contentious in the whole field and views expressed at this meeting might have been expected to be of great value to equipment and aircraft manufacturers. In fact, although much of interest was said, it cannot be recorded that there was a large measure of agreement between the pilots present.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 34 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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