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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Lelanie Smith, Oliver Oxtoby, A. Malan and Josua Meyer

– The purpose of this paper is to introduce a unique technique to couple the two-integral boundary layer solutions to a generic inviscid solver in an iterative fashion.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a unique technique to couple the two-integral boundary layer solutions to a generic inviscid solver in an iterative fashion.

Design/methodology/approach

The boundary layer solution is obtained using the two-integral method to solve displacement thickness point by point with a local Newton method, at a fraction of the cost of a conventional mesh-based, full viscous solution. The boundary layer solution is coupled with an existing inviscid solver. Coupling occurs by moving the wall to a streamline at the computed boundary layer thickness and treating it as a slip boundary, then solving the flow again and iterating. The Goldstein singularity present when solving boundary layer equations is overcome by solving an auxiliary velocity equation along with the displacement thickness.

Findings

The proposed method obtained favourable results when compared with the analytical solutions for flat and inclined plates. Further, it was applied to modelling the flow around a NACA0012 airfoil and yielded results similar to those of the widely used XFOIL code.

Originality/value

A unique method is proposed for coupling of the boundary layer solution to the inviscid flow. Rather than the traditional transpiration boundary condition, mesh movement is employed to simulate the boundary layer thickness in a more physically meaningful way. Further, a new auxiliary velocity equation is presented to circumvent the Goldstein singularity.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

MICHAEL J. NUSCA

An aerothermodynamic design code for axisymmetric projectiles has been developed using a viscous‐inviscid interaction scheme. Separate solution procedures for the inviscid…

Abstract

An aerothermodynamic design code for axisymmetric projectiles has been developed using a viscous‐inviscid interaction scheme. Separate solution procedures for the inviscid and the viscous (boundary layer) fluid dynamic equations are coupled by an iterative solution procedure. Non‐equilibrium, equilibrium and perfect gas boundary layer equations are included. The non‐equilibrium gas boundary layer equations assume a binary mixture (two species; atoms and molecules) of chemically reacting perfect gases. Conservation equations for each species include finite reaction rates applicable to high temperature air. The equilibrium gas boundary layer equations assume infinite rate reactions, while the perfect gas equations assume no chemical reactions. Projectile near‐wall and surface flow profiles (velocity, pressure, density, temperature and heat transfer) representing converged solutions to both the inviscid and viscous equations can be obtained in less than two minutes on minicomputers. A technique for computing local reverse flow regions is included. Computations for yawed projectiles are accomplished using a coordinate system transformation technique that is valid for small angle‐of‐attack. Computed surface pressure, heat transfer rates and aerodynamic forces and moments for 1.25 &le Mach No. &le 10.5 are compared to wind tunnel and free flight measurements on flat plate, blunt‐cone, and projectile geometries such as a cone‐cylinder‐flare.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1955

There are three lateral dynamic attitudes, delineated by rolling, yawing, and sideslipping. It is possible to solve for the pressures on the rolling wing by quasi‐steady…

Abstract

There are three lateral dynamic attitudes, delineated by rolling, yawing, and sideslipping. It is possible to solve for the pressures on the rolling wing by quasi‐steady analysis. This approach is, however, inapplicable for the yawing or sideslipping wing, and it is with the latter two cases that this paper deals.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

N. Baldock and M.R. Mokhtarzadeh‐Dehghan

Aims to present a methodology for analysing a solar‐electric, high‐altitude, long‐endurance, unmanned aircraft.

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Abstract

Purpose

Aims to present a methodology for analysing a solar‐electric, high‐altitude, long‐endurance, unmanned aircraft.

Design/methodology/approach

The study focuses on the aerodynamics, flight performance and power requirements of a heavier‐than‐air, solar‐electric, HALE UAV. The methodology is founded on using an analytical approach to determine the power required to undertake various flight manoeuvres. An analytical approach is also undertaken in determining the intensity of the solar radiation available to the aircraft. Finally to demonstrate the methodology, a HALE concept was generated and evaluated.

Findings

When using estimates of current solar‐electric propulsion and energy conversion efficiencies, the HALE concept was only able to sustain year round, level flight up to latitudes of 10°N.

Research limitations/implications

Further analysis needs to be undertaken into the effect of altitude on the intensity of solar radiation, which could be as much as 25 per cent higher at an altitude of 21.3 km (70,000 ft). Further study into this subject area may provide proof that sustained flight is possible at more northerly latitudes.

Originality/value

This paper provides a simple methodology for persons wishing to undertake an initial feasibility study of a solar‐electric HALE concept.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 78 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

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