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Case study
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Ameet Morjaria and Charlotte Snyder

Roger Cagle, the co-founder and deputy CEO of SOCO International, watched the dreary London rain outside his office window one February morning in 2015. Never had SOCO…

Abstract

Roger Cagle, the co-founder and deputy CEO of SOCO International, watched the dreary London rain outside his office window one February morning in 2015. Never had SOCO, the oil-and-gas exploration and production player that ranked among Britain’s top 200 companies, experienced such a public backlash against its operations. For nearly 20 years, Cagle had helped steer his company’s projects around the world—often in volatile regions where others feared to tread, such as Vietnam, Russia, and Yemen—while delivering significant returns to investors. But the international uproar surrounding SOCO during the past year had been nothing short of mind-boggling.

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Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Book part
Publication date: 14 June 2012

Judith Benz-Schwarzburg and Sophia Benz

Purpose – This study addresses the great apes' fatal situation in the wild by integrating perspectives from conservation biology, conflict research, and bioethics.

Abstract

Purpose – This study addresses the great apes' fatal situation in the wild by integrating perspectives from conservation biology, conflict research, and bioethics.

Design/methodology/approach – We introduce the great apes' red list status and describe habitat destruction and bushmeat commerce as main threats to their survival. We analyze the complex context in which great ape extinction takes place in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and thereby focus on a threatening factor that is interlinked with habitat destruction and bushmeat commerce: armed conflict.

Findings – The study shows that some characteristics of so-called “New Wars” are apparent in the DRC and that they directly or indirectly impact the great apes' situation. Because the human role in the animals' extinction is so severe and so obvious, ethical consequences become apparent. Animal ethics (the welfare as well as the rights approach) has to acknowledge the severity of the situation of the great apes in the wild. Implications for the human–animal relationship and the human identity come into play. After all, we have to ask ourselves what it means for us and for coming generations if our nearest relatives are going to be extinct one day.

Practical implications – It is argued that conservation policy has to include insights from conflict research. Likewise, peacemaking has to address ecological consequences of warfare.

Originality/value – Our findings promote an interdisciplinary approach. Armed conflict as a threatening factor to great ape survival has so far largely been neglected within the literature on conservation biology as well as in conflict research.

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Biopolicy: The Life Sciences and Public Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-821-2

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2019

Ildephonse Musafili, Jean Chrysostome Ngabitsinze, Fidèle Niyitanga and Dave Weatherspoon

Policymakers and stakeholders lack empirical evidence on the effectiveness of community participatory management for agribusiness development and environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

Policymakers and stakeholders lack empirical evidence on the effectiveness of community participatory management for agribusiness development and environmental conservation. The purpose of this paper is to assess the management preferences, approaches and practices of farm communities in Rwanda’s Volcanoes National Park (VNP).

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data collected from 191 farmers were used. A choice experiment on current and potential park management practices and utilization levels was conducted along with a survey on socioeconomic, farm and institutional behavior characteristics.

Findings

Results show that farmers prefer preserving VNP resources for the production of agribusiness crops that are low input and environmental friendly and provide high income to farmers in addition to handcraft production to enhance cultural, plant and wild animal tourism development. Farmers highly value integrated stakeholder participatory decision making about the parks natural resources. High-income farmers prefer to restore traditional cultural heritage park sites for recreation, and ancestral intellectual and cultural property rights.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size limited the analysis to a conditional logit model.

Originality/value

This is the first study to assess the management preferences of farm communities in the VNP area.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1975

Norman Myers

Tourism is sometimes described as a worthwhile activity for a developing economy. Among countries of emergent Africa, for example, Kenya derives a significant portion of…

Abstract

Tourism is sometimes described as a worthwhile activity for a developing economy. Among countries of emergent Africa, for example, Kenya derives a significant portion of its national economic advancement from tourism. But cogent socio‐economic arguments modify the general proposition for Kenya, as for several other developing countries. If these reservations are accorded proper attention, the tourist may yet prove the unwitting agent for development. If, however, the cost‐benefit construct is not adjusted to take account of these further factors, tourism in emergent Africa may end up by the way it is going in the Caribbean and several other parts of the Third World: a source of economic, cultural, social and ultimately political friction.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Case study
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Craig Furfine

32-year-old Heather Wilson was about to become a property investor. After years of painstaking savings, she had finally reached agreement to purchase her first buy-to-let…

Abstract

32-year-old Heather Wilson was about to become a property investor. After years of painstaking savings, she had finally reached agreement to purchase her first buy-to-let property, a 1 bedroom flat in London's sought-after Kensington and Chelsea neighborhood. She looked forward to a lifetime of building wealth through property investments. Of course, some of the income the property would generate would be owed to Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs (HMRC). But such was the nature of life. Unfortunately, the tax laws had only recently become less favorable for property investors, but Wilson expected to negotiate a lower purchase price as a result and so she felt confident that her investment remained solid.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 21 February 2018

Insecurity in eastern Congo

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DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB229912

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Patrick Ojera

The purpose of this chapter is to identify African financial management practices, highlight their origin and explain how they differ from their Western counterparts. The…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to identify African financial management practices, highlight their origin and explain how they differ from their Western counterparts. The study identified indigenous African financial practices using literature review, archival sources and library research covering the five areas of Africa comprising Northern Africa, Eastern Africa, Central Africa Western Africa and Southern Africa. The study found out that pre-colonial indigenous African financial management features prevalent use of trade finance, trade credit management, investment management and accounting. While there is also evidence of modification of Western financial management practices to suit African contexts, it is on the whole scarce. This is suggestive of the fact that they were in existence in the first instance. The clear conclusion is that many indigenous African financial management practices pre-dated and foreshadowed their Western counterparts. Yet, it is confounding that this has been largely lost sight of, and both scholars and financial management practitioners depict the former as inferior. There is clearly a need to remedy this situation. Educators need to focus on incorporating ethno-finance concepts into the entire curricula chain from basic to higher education. The anchor point for such curricula is Ubuntu philosophy. Financial management practitioners, on their part, need to shed notions that the indigenous practices are inferior and seek to journalise their day-to-day work experiences to build a body of documented practice.

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Indigenous Management Practices in Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-849-7

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Ebola and insecurity in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB240375

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2013

Johan M.G. van der Dennen

Purpose – This chapter contributes to comparative biopolitics and reviews primatological literature, especially about our nearest relatives, the Great…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter contributes to comparative biopolitics and reviews primatological literature, especially about our nearest relatives, the Great Apes.

Design/methodology/approach – Biopolitics in this chapter means evolutionarily informed political science, with emphasis on power relations. I review the literature on intrasexual and intersexual dominance interactions among individuals and competitive and/or agonistic interactions among groups in the Great Apes (Hominidae, formerly Pongidae): orangutan (Pongo with two species and three subspecies), gorilla (Gorilla with four subspecies), bonobo (Pan paniscus), and common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes with four subspecies). In the final section I present some (speculative) thoughts on Pan prior or the modern human ancestor.

Findings – Not only Man is a political animal.

Originality/value – Impartial, objective, and as complete as possible review of the literature for the students of (comparative) politics, ethology, and psychology.

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The world of biology and politics: Organization and research areas
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-728-3

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 11 February 2020

Rwanda's tourism sector.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB250595

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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