Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Paola Mancini, Andrea Marchini and Mariarosaria Simeone

This is an exploratory study on consumer information and behaviour towards green, health, local, social and environmental credentials on labels. It focusses on many…

Abstract

Purpose

This is an exploratory study on consumer information and behaviour towards green, health, local, social and environmental credentials on labels. It focusses on many dimensions of sustainability in the food products that affect consumer choices with a dual purpose: to identify and define “sustainable consumption” behaviour in broad sense and to investigate empirically the factors affecting the real consumption behaviours. The purpose of this paper is to shed light on consumers’ understanding, motivation and use of sustainable labelling in order to understand the role sustainability information plays in the food products market.

Design/methodology/approach

Two focus groups in order to investigate consumer motivation and behaviour in-depth and to prepare the questionnaire. Identification of the outcomes that could summarize sustainable consumption combining: purchase of local products, consume only seasonal fruit, prefer products with recyclable packaging, attention to the fat content in foods, give importance to traceability and purchase products only in the place of origin. Identification of the “at risk” virtuous consumer, using a binary logistic regression approach, taking into account demographic characteristics, the food and nutrition value system, experience, knowledge, institutional factors and marketing.

Findings

Results from the focus groups are mainly in line with the empirical analysis, highlighting the key role of education in influencing consumer attitude and behaviour. Consumers give little attention to information provided on the label for sustainable food consumption and environmental protection and have little knowledge of environmental problems. The virtuous consumer appears to give importance to a better food nutrition value system, to pay more attention to ingredients and instructions on the label, to be more attentive to environmental and sustainable attributes, to be concerned about product quality and to be slightly influenced by brands and special offers.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from the empirical analysis confirm the results from focus groups even if it was not possible from the empirical analysis to investigate in-depth the marketing aspects concerning the food choice. This limit probably comes from the low number of observations. Further research will focus on these marketing aspects.

Practical implications

Products with sustainable attributes can become a strategic variable and allow companies to gain a competitive advantage, especially for small- and medium-sized enterprises. This may encourage the development of new marketing channels based on the direct relationship between producer and the new consumer demand, increasingly sensitive to the food security issues.

Social implications

There is a potential interest and sensitiveness to having sustainable behaviour in a broad sense, but there is a lack of knowledge about how to behave to be sustainable. In the absence of binding rules, it is necessary that government promote information and campaigns to generate greater awareness on sustainability, aiming at increasing knowledge to drive the consumer’s choices. This may lead to virtuous results in terms of reducing social costs related to an unhealthy diet, food waste and unsustainable consumption.

Originality/value

The results show that despite the appearance of attention to the environment and to healthy food which is associated with this emerging critical consumer in the literature, there remains the problem of the consumer giving little attention to information provided on the label for sustainable food consumption and environmental protection. This is the problem of “rules of thumb” in purchasing decisions that prevail in the following situations: when consumers have an overload of information that exceeds their processing limits; when they tend to base their decision making on heuristics, focussing their choices on brands as a proxy for high-quality, product-related characteristics.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Maria Amália Dutra Machado, Stefânia Ordovás de Almeida, Laura Chiattone Bollick and Gabriela Bragagnolo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of consumer motivation in the context of the circular economy (CE) through the reuse of fashion products.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of consumer motivation in the context of the circular economy (CE) through the reuse of fashion products.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was employed through ethnographic as well as in-depth interviews with nine consumers who buy used fashion products in thrift stores and street fairs in Brazil.

Findings

The findings are based on interrelationships and overlaps found in the integration between the three-dimensional consumer motivations to buy second-hand fashion cited in the literature. A framework showing a virtuous circle of motivations involving the consumer in an active role in the CE is proposed as a result.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include participants’ selection and a single region data collection. Implications aim to help researchers to more fully understand a new and complex consumer behavior in a CE.

Practical implications

By highlighting consumers’ motivations for this kind of commerce, the practical implications of this work are the possibilities to inspire retailers to start second-hand fashion businesses. Also, policy makers can focus on engaging consumers in active roles that foster CE events.

Originality/value

This work is one of the first attempts to show the role of consumers in the CE and their motivations to engage in this active behavior.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Monica Fait, Demetris Vrontis, Amedeo Maizza and Federica Cavallo

The purpose of this paper is to observe how the motivational engagement system of the consumers should be established so that communities of practice became a driver to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to observe how the motivational engagement system of the consumers should be established so that communities of practice became a driver to reducing the informative asymmetries of sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes a conceptual framework called connection, discussion and influence (CDI), along which the motivational dimensions to disclose sustainability can be formed. The framework has been tested on 200 firms in the Italian wine industry. A correlation analysis proved to be suitable for identifying groups of representative variables representing the engagement motivations that characterize participation in sustainability-oriented virtual communities.

Findings

The findings of this paper suggest that the pro-social behavior represented by the exchange of knowledge oriented toward sustainability is enhanced by the engagement of online community members. This happens when the online community is structured so as to activate a virtuous circle between CDI.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study is the interviewees do not actually participate in a virtual community, but have only been asked if they would be potentially interested in participating in one, and about the importance they give to specific motivations.

Practical implications

The paper provides important reflections for companies operating in the wine industry that have been called to intervene in the disclosure of sustainability.

Originality/value

The virtuous circle described here is the main contribution of the paper, as it can serve as a driver for managers of virtual communities that choose to disclose their idea of sustainability to reduce informative asymmetries and to engage consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Elaine L. Ritch

The purpose of this study is to explore consumers perceptions of sustainability, including how information is accessed, evaluated and practiced and how sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore consumers perceptions of sustainability, including how information is accessed, evaluated and practiced and how sustainability concepts transfer to fashion consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts a phenomenological approach of unstructured interviews with 28 professionally working mothers. Garment labels indicating concepts of sustainability from UK fashion-retailers were used as a vehicle for discussion. Data was analysed through the theoretical lens of Holbrook’s (1999) typology of consumer value.

Findings

The findings identity that the participants struggle with understanding how sustainability is compromised within fashion-production and how their sustainability practice fluctuates depending on information, guidance and practical support. The findings also identify preferences for sustainability, where sustainable concepts are perceived as adding value.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations are assumed through the small focussed sample, however, the research does provide rich insight into micro-analytic idiographic lifeworlds to better understand how everyday deliberations of household management and sustainability concepts are practiced.

Practical implications

The findings illustrate pathways for retailers, producers and policymakers to guide sustainability and support sustainability through the use of labels and marketing which will enhance notions of value. Similarly, the findings can enable policymakers to position campaigns and practical solutions that advance the sustainability agenda.

Social implications

The research indicates that sustainability is filtering through society and drawing the attention of a broader consumer market, including passive mainstream consumers who are developing expectations that mainstream fashion-retailers address sustainability.

Originality/value

The research is novel in adopting a phenomenological approach that provides a unique insight into how sustainability is experienced in everyday households, through the adaptation of related behaviours and evaluating sustainability concepts.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Francesca De Canio, Elisa Martinelli and Emiro Endrighi

Environmental concern is getting increasing importance in consumer shopping decisions. Nevertheless, to date, sustainable packaged foods are not always the first option…

Abstract

Purpose

Environmental concern is getting increasing importance in consumer shopping decisions. Nevertheless, to date, sustainable packaged foods are not always the first option when consumers go shopping. This paper analyses how environmental concern moderates the role played by external factors – preference towards sustainable retailers and trust in sustainable producers – in determining consumer purchase intentions for sustainable packaged foods. Consumer involvement in eco-friendly labels, increasingly present in food packages, is investigated as indirectly impacting pro-environmental purchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey administered to a sample of Italian food shoppers is used for the empirical analysis. A total of 278 structured questionnaires were modelled using a structural equation modelling approach.

Findings

Findings show that producers and retailers' policies in favour of sustainability are key in determining consumers' sustainable purchase intentions. Further, coherent uses of labels and logos in light of sustainability can support consumer purchase decisions. Relevant is the influence played by the environmental concern in both supporting pro-environmental purchase intentions and in amplifying the trust in sustainable producers-purchase intentions path.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on sustainability showing how producers and retailers may together influence consumers' pro-environmental purchase intentions. Findings extend the retail literature on the impact of producers and retailers' policies on consumers' sustainable purchases. Further, environmental concern is investigated in its moderating role on the impact of external factors on consumers' pro-environmental purchase intentions.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Multi-Channel Marketing, Branding and Retail Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-455-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Marine Cambefort and Elyette Roux

This paper aims to provide a typology of perceived risk in the context of consumer brand resistance and thus answers the following question: how do consumers perceive the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a typology of perceived risk in the context of consumer brand resistance and thus answers the following question: how do consumers perceive the risk they take when resisting brands?

Design/methodology/approach

Two qualitative methods were used. In-depth interviews were carried out with 15 consumers who resist brands. An ethnography was carried out for ten months in an international pro-environmental NGO.

Findings

This multiple qualitative method design led to the identification of four types of risks taken by consumers. The four categories of perceived risks identified are performance (lack of suitable alternatives for the brand), social issues (stigma and exclusion), legal reasons (legal proceedings) or physical considerations (violation of physical integrity). These risks are located along a continuum of resistance intensity. Resistance intensity levels are avoidance, offline word-of-mouth, online word-of-mouth, boycott, activism and finally extreme acts.

Originality/value

This study provides a framework that integrates perceived risks within the context of brand resistance. The paper highlights extreme acts of resistance and questions the limits of such behaviors.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Byoungho Jin and Junghwa Son

The purposes of this study are to empirically test the differences among three major cities in India by their affluence level, selected factors related to consumer

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this study are to empirically test the differences among three major cities in India by their affluence level, selected factors related to consumer purchase behaviors, and to examine the regional differences in purchase behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 652 usable data were collected from consumers of age 18 years or older residing in Mumbai, New Delhi, and Bangalore, India via mall intercept surveys.

Findings

Overall, the findings confirmed that affluence level in each region explains the variances in region's values, attitudes, lifestyles, and consumption patterns of foreign branded goods. That is, Mumbai (i.e. the highest GDP among the three cities) showed individualistic characteristics (i.e. lower levels of face saving and group conformity). Attitude toward economizing was found to be inversely related to a city's affluence level with Bangalore (least affluent) having the highest attitude toward economizing and Mumbai (most affluent) having the lowest attitude toward economizing. Mumbai and New Delhi consumers purchased significantly more foreign jeans than Bangalore consumers. In purchasing foreign brand goods, social attributes (i.e. brand name and latest fashion) were more prominent in Bangalore consumers who are the most collectivistic in this study.

Practical implications

The findings of this study convey a clear message: assuming Indian consumers are the same across regions is a mistake and a localization approach should be considered to market to each region.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first attempts to examine regional differences in the Indian market. This study adds empirical evidence that differing economic affluence levels are critical in estimating consumption differences by region.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

1 – 10 of over 2000