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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Phil Lambert, Warren Marks, Virginia Elliott and Natalie Johnston-Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study examining the existence and perceived influence of “generational collide” for teachers and leaders across three…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study examining the existence and perceived influence of “generational collide” for teachers and leaders across three generations – Baby Boomers, Generation X (Gen X) and Generation Y (Gen Y). The study sought to further determine if a teacher’s generation, gender, school level or position influenced their beliefs about generational leadership change.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a cross-sectional survey using an explanatory sequential mixed methods design. A random sample of teachers and leaders from schools in the Sydney metropolitan area participated in a questionnaire (n=244) and a purposive sample of eight participants from each of the three generational groups (n=24) participated in a follow up interview.

Findings

The data revealed that teachers and leaders across all three generations agreed that “generational collide” is real and is currently happening in some schools. Each generation has their own perceptions about the “collide” and often do not recognise that this may differ for other generations. In relation to the key variables, this study demonstrated that primary teachers were significantly more likely to believe that generational leadership change was happening than secondary teachers and that Baby Boomers were significantly more likely to view their staying on past retirement age as positive compared to both Gen X and Gen Y.

Practical implications

The findings from this study have practical implications for system leaders charged with the responsibility of providing the supply of quality leadership for schools through effective succession planning programmes and policies.

Social implications

The findings from this study have social implications for principals’ (and deputy principals’) professional associations who have the responsibility for the personal, professional and career welfare of principals and aspiring principals.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the growing body of evidence around generational collide in schools by providing an Australian perspective on the phenomenon. Moreover, this paper raises important concerns for school leaders and administrators involved in leadership development initiatives at the micro, meso and macro levels. Teachers in each generation have specific beliefs around promotion, career pathways, knowledge transfer and talent retention that need to be recognised and considered in future succession planning.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Rachel Crane

Film provides an alternative medium for assessing our interpretations of cultural icons. This selective list looks at the film and video sources for information on and…

Abstract

Film provides an alternative medium for assessing our interpretations of cultural icons. This selective list looks at the film and video sources for information on and interpretations of the life of Woody Guthrie.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Case study
Publication date: 23 November 2005

Marlene Friesen and Elliott N. Weiss

This case outlines the history of JetBlue Airways from its inception in 2000 until 2004. The case provides details of JetBlue's business model and reasons for success. It…

Abstract

This case outlines the history of JetBlue Airways from its inception in 2000 until 2004. The case provides details of JetBlue's business model and reasons for success. It can be used in a course on service operations or strategy.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Susan L. Porter and Marcia L. Pentz

This paper aims to contribute to the special issue by sharing reflections on and best practices derived from the successful five-year iteration of a semester-long, hybrid…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the special issue by sharing reflections on and best practices derived from the successful five-year iteration of a semester-long, hybrid, international accounting course which centers on a short-term cultural immersion component in Ireland. The course provides students with an opportunity to learn about international business and to learn about the importance of tolerance and finding common ground with people.

Design/methodology/approach

Discussion of the process the course designer used to combine traditional technical content with a “liberal arts,” soft-skills content and places both firmly within the international cultural context of a short-term, study abroad experience. The paper includes insight into how the authors choose a country to visit, develop international academic partners, administer an international case competition and assess student performance throughout the course.

Findings

The paper identifies practices that were successful and implementation of changes over time for course improvement.

Originality/value

This describes a unique approach to incorporating a hybrid-based course that was developed to embrace cultural differences while maintaining high expectations for understanding and application of technical accounting material.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Randolph T. Barker, Glenn H. Gilbreath and Warren S. Stone

This paper discusses the need for and possible resistance to interdiscplinary education and development in the US business schools today. In‐depth structured interviews…

Abstract

This paper discusses the need for and possible resistance to interdiscplinary education and development in the US business schools today. In‐depth structured interviews were conducted with executives from 12 companies located in the Mid‐Atlantic states of the USA, each of which is included in the Fortune 1000 listing. Interview questions sought input on the appropriateness of recent new hires’ knowledge and skill level to meet organizational demands. Content analysis of interview responses produced five major content themes. These themes indicate that newly hired employees need to possess greater: communication skills in speaking, writing and interpersonal relations; team‐oriented skills; cross‐functional/ interdisciplinary perspective; change receptivity; and intercultural awareness. One approach for meeting these organizational needs and increased interdisciplinary interaction among the faculty is presented.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Kashef A. Majid, David W. Kolar and Michel Laroche

Crises threaten the operations of small businesses and endanger their survival; however, when the crisis is not attributable to the firm, consumers may rally around the…

Abstract

Purpose

Crises threaten the operations of small businesses and endanger their survival; however, when the crisis is not attributable to the firm, consumers may rally around the business. This study aims to examine how attitudes toward helping others can create support for small businesses, which in turn can direct consumers to help businesses with increased financial support. It is hoped that this paper will inform how consumers will help firms pivot during crises.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model was proposed which linked support for helping others to increased willingness to tip/amount tipped. The model was tested using structural equation modeling from two surveys given to customers of two small businesses, a coffee shop and an independent movie theater, respectively.

Findings

During a crisis, support for helping others has a positive impact on feelings of support for small businesses. Consumers direct their support to small businesses that they are interested in seeing survive and continue operations. They either tip more or tip when they otherwise would not have tipped.

Practical implications

Firms that pivot their operations because of a crisis imposed on them can still generate revenues. Consumers who have a self-interest in the continuing operations of the firm want to support it, and by pivoting their business model, the firm gives consumers the opportunity to give the firm and its employees more than they would have in the form of tips.

Originality/value

Prior work in crisis management has focused primarily on how firms recover and respond to a crisis of their doing. Overwhelmingly, consumers have been shown to punish firms during times of crisis. However, for a crisis that is imposed on the firm, consumers may rally behind the firm and respond by supporting it more than they are required to.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Diane Lynch, Barbara Ann Elliott and Debbi D. Brock

There has been great interest in social enterprise as an innovative response to challenging social problems, where mission and market are intertwined in a hybrid…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been great interest in social enterprise as an innovative response to challenging social problems, where mission and market are intertwined in a hybrid organization. The purpose of this paper is to provide students with a rich learning experience about social enterprises and how a social entrepreneur balances the double bottom line while trying to create social value.

Design/methodology/approach

The teaching case study was developed using personal interviews with the founder, board of directors and employees of the organization, observations and materials from the organization.

Findings

The findings from the field show that it is one thing to design a social enterprise that fulfils a social mission, quite another to make it sustainable. At the end of the 2005, the founder of Appalachian By Design (ABD), Diane Browning was faced with the difficult task of improving the financial condition to save the organization. The epilogue and detailed teaching notes provides insights into the impact of the organization on creating job opportunities for rural women in a shifting global economy.

Practical implications

This longitudinal descriptive case study provides social enterprises with the lessons learned and raises questions that all social entrepreneurs face when developing a social enterprise. The case provides a detailed analysis of the organization development and sustainability which will assist social entrepreneurs in addressing these issues early in the organizations development.

Originality/value

The value of the case of Appalachian By Design to the field is providing a robust analysis of the issues facing social enterprises and building a business model that sustains social value.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2009

Delbert Elliott

On 20 April 1999, at Columbine High School in Colorado, two students, Eric Harris (aged 18) and Dylan Klebold (17), embarked on a massacre, killing 12 students and one…

Abstract

On 20 April 1999, at Columbine High School in Colorado, two students, Eric Harris (aged 18) and Dylan Klebold (17), embarked on a massacre, killing 12 students and one teacher. The pair then committed suicide. The event provoked vigorous debate around topics such as the gun culture, bullying, violent video games, goth culture and teenage use of the internet and anti‐depressants. In nearby Boulder is the Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, part of the University of Colorado. Del Elliott, a world‐renowned criminologist and sociologist, has been director there since 1993. Columbine was the catalyst for Del and a team of researchers, policy‐makers and practitioners to develop the Blueprints for Violence Prevention database of evidence‐based programmes. On 2 July 2009, Del gave the annual Social Research Unit, Dartington, lecture at the Commonwealth Club in London. This article is based on his talk.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Book part
Publication date: 28 April 2021

Stephen P. Kilgus and David A. Klingbeil

Tier 2 intervention is defined by the application of brief, efficient, and accessible supports for students who are at risk for social-emotional and behavioral concerns…

Abstract

Tier 2 intervention is defined by the application of brief, efficient, and accessible supports for students who are at risk for social-emotional and behavioral concerns. Historically, Tier 2 interventions have been delivered in accordance with a standard protocol, with each student receiving the same general strategy in an undifferentiated manner. Yet, research has suggested the potential value of an adaptive Tier 2 approach, wherein brief assessments are conducted to determine which intervention (or adapted version of one particular intervention) is best suited to a student's individual needs. Within this chapter, we provide an overview of procedures related to adaptive Tier 2 intervention and discuss different approaches one might take to this practice. We conclude with a discussion of directions for future research in this area if adaptive Tier 2 intervention is to be widely adopted, implemented, and sustained within schools.

Details

The Next Big Thing in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-749-7

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Elliott N. Weiss and Marlene Friesen

This case details the history of Southwest Airlines from its inception in 1971 until 2004. The case provides details of Southwest's business model and reasons for its…

Abstract

This case details the history of Southwest Airlines from its inception in 1971 until 2004. The case provides details of Southwest's business model and reasons for its success. It ends with a description of the company's competitive pressures in 2004. The case can be used for a course in service operations or strategy.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

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