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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Vinod Shastri

Every year, tonnes of flower waste from religious places is dumped into India’s holiest river Ganges, polluting it to virtual death. Pesticides and insecticides used in…

Abstract

Every year, tonnes of flower waste from religious places is dumped into India’s holiest river Ganges, polluting it to virtual death. Pesticides and insecticides used in growing these flowers mix with the water, affecting millions of lives through water-borne diseases. Most others may just lament these facts, Ankit Agarwal and Karan Rastogi, childhood friends from Kanpur, used them as inspiration to innovate. Two years of relentless experimentation led to a brilliant idea; that of recycling the flower waste. They founded HelpUsGreen® in 2014 to convert the waste into bio-fertilisers and lifestyle products. Widely appreciated and heavily awarded now, success has not come easy for this well-educated duo. HelpUsGreen® processes hundreds of kilos of flower waste, creating employment for hundreds of underprivileged women. An entirely bootstrapped project with no carbon foot print, the venture hopes to revive the Ganges through Flowercycling®. Currently at 8.5 tonnes per day and at the tipping point of scaling, HelpUsGreen® hopes to process over 50 tonnes of flower waste per day by 2020. Apart from the environmental impact, HelpUsGreen® has achieved huge societal impact, employing over a thousand women who did not previously have formal employment. What also makes the social entrepreneurs stand apart is their entrepreneurial market savviness. They have positioned their products not at the sympathy market but at the high-end premium market. Their products sell under the name ‘Phool’. HelpUsGreen® has set its eyes firmly on spreading operations across 2,000 kilometres along the Ganges and creating over 25,000 jobs for women.

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Abstract

Details

Start-up Marketing Strategies in India
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-755-9

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Rajani Jain, Sangeeta Sahney and Gautam Sinha

The changes in social and cultural framework, and even more in the economic order, have pushed the education system and higher education in particular, into a new…

Abstract

Purpose

The changes in social and cultural framework, and even more in the economic order, have pushed the education system and higher education in particular, into a new environment in which quality plays an important role. Thus, the purpose of the current study is to develop a multidimensional scale to measure service quality in higher education in the Indian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study, descriptive, diagnostic, and causal in nature, has been conducted on students of higher education, particularly technical education in India. A questionnaire consisting of 26 items was developed to measure the service quality construct and its dimensions. Construct validation using exploratory factor analysis showed an interpretable latent structure consisting of seven dimensions.

Findings

It was observed that service quality in higher education setting comprises seven dimensions viz., input quality, curriculum, academic facilities, industry interaction, interaction quality, support facilities and non academic processes.

Research limitations/implications

The study holds implications for institutes of technical education in India that seek to improve the quality of service that they provide. The scale developed can be used by practitioners as a diagnostic tool for identifying poor and/or excellent service performance.

Originality/value

While studies in quality management for education have been conducted, this study lays emphasis on the student as a customer of education, and proposes to develop a scale to measure their perception of service quality. The study is an attempt towards developing and empirically validating a measurement scale for service quality in higher education in the Indian context.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2011

Rajani Jain, Gautam Sinha and Sangeeta Sahney

In a pursuit of excellence, it is increasingly important to identify customer values and demands. Service quality has been identified as one such demand. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

In a pursuit of excellence, it is increasingly important to identify customer values and demands. Service quality has been identified as one such demand. The purpose of this paper is to develop the model for service quality in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model is based on a current conceptualization of service quality, which suggests that service quality is a multidimensional and hierarchical construct.

Findings

In the proposed model, service quality consists of two primary dimensions which are defined by several corresponding sub‐dimensions: program quality: curriculum, industry interaction, input quality, academic facilities; and quality of life: non‐academic processes, support facilities, campus and interaction quality.

Originality/value

The paper has value for the institutes seeking to improve the quality of services they provide.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

Keywords

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