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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 68 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Hong T.M. Bui, Vinh Sum Chau and Jacqueline Cox

The importance of foresight is discussed in relation to why traditional scenario planning methodology is problematic at achieving it. The “survivor syndrome” is borrowed…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of foresight is discussed in relation to why traditional scenario planning methodology is problematic at achieving it. The “survivor syndrome” is borrowed from the human resources literature and presented as a metaphor for foresight to illustrate how better “scenarios” can be achieved by understanding the syndrome better. A practice perspective is given on the use of a seven-theme framework as a method of interviewing survivors. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from an empirical research that took place during the 2008 global financial crisis to illustrate the richness of the insights that would otherwise not be obtainable through scenario planning methods that do not involve “survivors.” In that research, semi-structured interviews were employed with key personnel at multiple levels of one private and one public organization that had undergone a redundancy process at the time of the crisis to explore its effect on the remaining workforce.

Findings

The “survivor syndrome” itself would be minimized if managers consider the feelings of survivors with more open communication. Survivors in private firms were found generally to experience anxiety, but are more likely to remain more motivated, than their counterparts in the public sector. These detailed insights create more accurate “scenarios” in scenario planning exercises.

Originality/value

Organizational performance can be better enhanced if the survivor syndrome can be better managed. In turn, scenario planning, as a form of organizational foresight, is better practiced through managing the survivor syndrome. Scenario planning methodology has proliferated well in the human resource management literature.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 68 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Vinh Sum Chau

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce the special issue on the relationship of strategic performance management to team strategy, company performance and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce the special issue on the relationship of strategic performance management to team strategy, company performance and organizational effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explains each of the components in this relationship before introducing the problematic issues regarding this relationship and where the gaps are missing in the extant literature; hence the need for the special issue is justified.

Findings

The paper finds that the concluding remarks are offered to suggest that strategic performance management can take place at top management, middle management, or strategic operations levels, and the their impact on team strategy, company performance and organizational effectiveness can be regarded as a special phenomenon, termed “strategic team performance management”.

Originality/value

This editorial provides an overview of this compilation which comprises five original papers that are examples of latest developments in this research area, and each of these articles contains a brief introduction on how they contribute to filling in gaps in the literature.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Vinh Sum Chau and Barry J. Witcher

The purpose of this paper is to explain how hoshin kanri (policy management) is used as a higher order dynamic capability at Nissan. The paper also seeks to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how hoshin kanri (policy management) is used as a higher order dynamic capability at Nissan. The paper also seeks to examine the role of top executive audits as part of the FAIR strategy execution process to develop core competences as part of team management.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used semi‐retrospective ethnographic case summaries recorded by an active manager involved in the implementation process of the researched organizational phenomenon. These documented observations were triangulated against internally published company reports and those made public, and any externally published documentation about Nissan.

Findings

The paper finds that the use of a top executive audit (TEA) as a part of hoshin kanri, works as a high‐order dynamic capability according to Teece et al. . Hoshin kanri is premised on a strong reliance on teamwork, and the effectiveness of teams is a major contributory factor to organizational performance. It works well because TEAs are a special form of organizational audit of lower‐level operations against top‐level strategy (i.e. it is a strategic review framework).

Originality/value

How Nissan's business philosophies and methodologies are managed as core capabilities is explored. TEAs, as a key component of hoshin kanri, are examined as a strategic team performance management system.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Vinh Sum Chau and Barry J. Witcher

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of reflexivity in ensuring quality in the conduct of qualitative organizational and management (especially case study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of reflexivity in ensuring quality in the conduct of qualitative organizational and management (especially case study based) strategic performance management research. It argues the importance of research reports to include a reflexive account of the comings and goings about the circumstances that may have impacted upon the research to justify its validity. A project on UK‐regulated public utilities is used to illustrate the benefit of such an account and how it may be presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a two‐year longitudinal research project, which used longitudinal case studies to examine the impact of regulatory policy incentives on the strategic management of UK monopoly network utilities, to present a developed approach for presenting reflexive accounts in qualitative research. It focuses on the longitudinal tracer methodology that allows a close examination of detailed yet holistic operational activities, which is particularly good for strategic performance management research.

Findings

The paper suggests that the more explicit the reflexive appreciation during the conduct of the research, the better it satisfies the conditions of reliability and validity which are themselves well‐known prerequisites for ensuring quality in qualitative research.

Practical implications

Strategic performance management research is characterised by a need to examine closely detailed internal decision‐making processes. Such an approach is supported by the emerging activity‐based view of management, known as strategy‐as‐practice, that concerns understanding micro‐activities of the organization. The provision of a reflexive account in research reports alerts the reader to these equivocal conditions under which the findings were derived.

Originality/value

The paper concludes that an appreciation of the epistemological and ontological positions of the tracer methodology has an impact upon the way in which a reflexive account of organizational research should appropriately be presented. It suggests some potential issues to include in the presentation of reflexive accounts.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 58 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

Vinh Sum Chau

The purpose of this paper is to review the evolution and development of customer service performance measures in the electricity sector since privatization in 1989, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the evolution and development of customer service performance measures in the electricity sector since privatization in 1989, and then examine the impact of a specific recent energy regulatory requirement (known as information and incentives project (IIP)) on the organizational management of an exemplar electricity distribution company. Also discussed is how the sector has tried to learn from benchmarks from a number of such literary disciplines as economics, marketing service quality, and total quality management.

Design/methodology/approach

The research first presents a survey of the historical development of performance standards based on archival documentation. It is then augmented by the employment of a longitudinal “tracer study”, involving the isolation and firsthand real time qualitative observations of a company's key strategic and operational activities, to understand how they related to the other organizational phenomena at large. This process spanned an investigative period of two years.

Findings

The paper finds that much of the early standards used in electricity immediately after the sector's privatization rested much on those in the water and gas safety sectors, which themselves were then admittedly inadequate in UK. The IIP, a complementary set of service quality standards, worked on these early problems, but the implementation of the new scheme proved problematic and warranted major organizational reengineering, as shown in the exemplar company, ElectriCo. IIP has impacted on organizational management mostly in the areas of: higher‐level strategic change, causing noticeable internal confusion during strategic transitions, building a performance management system, improvements in performance data, and establishing more effective ways for management.

Research limitations/implications

While the case example used in the research is a regional monopoly and is a good representation of the context in which the service standards operate, the findings are limited to the one company. It is a UK specific context without international comparison.

Originality/value

The research has combined archival research with an innovative firsthand methodological approach (tracer studies). Its value is in how the story of service standards in electricity (and specifically distribution) has been augmented from the early customer service standards to the most recent IIP considerations. It also looks from within the company, which has been missing in longstanding research in the more traditional disciplines such as economics.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2009

Vinh Sum Chau and Yu‐Ying Kao

This paper seeks to apply the SERVQUAL model to identify critical performance measures in the airline industry, exploring differences between Eastern and Western…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to apply the SERVQUAL model to identify critical performance measures in the airline industry, exploring differences between Eastern and Western expectations of airline service quality and delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 263 effective questionnaire responses were collected from two locations – Taipei (Taiwan) and London (UK) – to compare differences between the well‐documented gap‐5 (between perceived and expected levels of service quality) values of respondents from these places of origin.

Findings

The paper generally finds that: there is a statistically significant difference between the perceived and expected levels of service quality in the airline industry; these are affected by such demographic factors as education, occupation and income levels (but not all that were examined); the SERVQUAL model's dimensions represent appropriately the airline industry; and the gap‐5 sizes of these quality dimensions have a significant impact on customer satisfaction and service value; but there does not seem to be a statistically significant difference between the gap‐5s of respondents from the two locations.

Research limitations/implications

The paper limited the research to data from two locations, and makes a bold assumption that the two locations make adequate representations of views from the East and West.

Practical implications

Gap‐5 and general SERVQUAL analyses seem to apply well to the airline industry. Further, management effort need not be different for the delivery of service quality between Eastern and Western passengers/customers. The findings are generalizable to other sectors for which service quality is an important public sector concern (e.g. household utilities).

Originality/value

A generic framework is presented for how service quality dimensions, and issues of gap‐5, relate to overall service quality, customer satisfaction, and service value, in the passenger airline industry.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2007

Barry J. Witcher, Vinh Sum Chau and Paul Harding

The paper explores the involvement of top management in strategic reviews of the organization's operational activities (known as top executive audits or TEAs). These are…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper explores the involvement of top management in strategic reviews of the organization's operational activities (known as top executive audits or TEAs). These are discussed in relation to strategy process and business excellence.

Design/methodology/approach

The case of Nissan South Africa (NSA) is used to illustrate their importance and their relation to hoshin kanri (policy deployment) practice.

Findings

The paper argues that TEAs are a very important and integrative aspect of the holistic management of the organization. TEAs are also crucial to hoshin kanri and facilitate operational effectiveness.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that strategic reviews, such as TEAs, are best operated when integrated together as an organization‐wide managed system of review.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2009

Fiona Lettice and Martin McCracken

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Barry J. Witcher, Vinh Sum Chau and Paul Harding

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of top executive audits (TEAs) as part of hoshin kanri (policy management) at Nissan South Africa (NSA). It relates these…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of top executive audits (TEAs) as part of hoshin kanri (policy management) at Nissan South Africa (NSA). It relates these to the emerging importance of core competencies in the resource‐based view of strategy to discuss “nested” sets of dynamic capabilities and superior performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study of NSA is considered in terms of how the firm defines its core areas, evaluates its business methodologies and management philosophies, and conducts its diagnosis of management. This was through real time internal company observation during an intensive phase of organizational change and documentation supplied by a senior manager.

Findings

The style of TEAs at Nissan is related to the concepts of “core competency” and “dynamic capability.” The core business areas of NSA are organization‐wide competencies necessary for competitive success, and the management of these is shown to be most effective in the form of a TEA, which in the hoshin kanri form, is arguably a nested set of dynamic capabilities.

Originality/value

The paper concludes that hoshin kanri and TEAs are used at Nissan as a higher order dynamic capability to develo0p both core competences in key areas of the business, and core capabilities in terms of its corporate methodologies and business philosophies. The recovery of Nissan during the East Asian Crisis of the late‐1990s was the result of improved productivity practices, such as the uses of hoshin kanri and TEAs, and not just of economic recovery.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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