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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Vincent Cho, Erica R. Hamilton and Kaitlyn F. Tuthill

Although organizational visions can guide everyday work, little is known about how visions relating to non-academic goals, such as social justice, might be integrated into…

Abstract

Purpose

Although organizational visions can guide everyday work, little is known about how visions relating to non-academic goals, such as social justice, might be integrated into educators’ technology practices. The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze one school’s 1:1 iPad initiative, including the potential role played by the school’s social justice mission.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed-methods case study drew upon data collected in a 1:1 school enrolling approximately 1,500 students. In total, approximately 138 educators responded to the online survey, and 18 educators participated in interviews. Social network analysis (SNA) techniques (i.e. faction analysis) and analysis of variance helped to describe educators’ instructional practices and attitudes involving iPads, including the extent to which devices were used in alignment with the school’s mission and vision.

Findings

Lacking a centralizing core of actors, the school was found to be divided into nine distinct, cohesive subgroups (i.e. factions). Statistically significant differences were found among these communities of discourse. Leaders’ lack of centrality in school change, especially as it related to helping teachers envision ways to connect mission with practices, may have hindered technology integration and instructional innovation.

Originality/value

Whereas prior research has described the centralizing role leaders may play in 1:1 initiatives, this study demonstrates how a lack of centralized leadership structures may adversely impact a sense of mission, and ultimately, technology integration. Moreover, this study advances the use of SNA methodologies in studies of leadership, especially the use of latent, underlying communities of discourse as categories for further analysis. As such, the authors discuss recommendations for leaders regarding the development of cohesion around issues of mission, vision and technology integration. Further, the authors point toward ways in which scholars might conceptualize about technologically supported educational change.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 57 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2021

Vincent Cho, Katrina Borowiec and Kaitlyn F. Tuthill

Applications for tracking and managing classroom behavior have become increasingly commonplace, thus making it possible to incorporate nonacademic data into collaborative…

Abstract

Purpose

Applications for tracking and managing classroom behavior have become increasingly commonplace, thus making it possible to incorporate nonacademic data into collaborative problem-solving and school improvement. Whether or how these platforms might support such aims, however, is not known. Accordingly, this study explores practices involving these applications, focusing especially on problem-solving among educators and with students' families.

Design/methodology/approach

This comparative case study took place in three schools. In total, 34 semistructured interviews were conducted with teachers and school leaders. Analysis included qualitative coding as well as the development of within- and cross-case summaries.

Findings

Schools varied greatly when it came to using behavior management platforms as a part of problem-solving. At a basic level, it was not uncommon for educators to use behavioral data for classroom troubleshooting or check-ins with students and transactional communications with families. However, only two schools attempted to use behavioral data for more systemic, “big picture” problem-solving, such as to make discipline policies more equitable or to improve teacher practices. The richness of collaboration with families seemed especially shaped by how and how frequently data were shared (e.g. automated notifications and paper printouts).

Originality/value

Empirical research about behavior management applications has been limited and focused only at the classroom level. The present study contributes new knowledge about the school-level implications of these platforms, while also expanding conversations about how behavioral data may be incorporated into data-informed problem-solving. Implications for leadership and theory are also discussed.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 59 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2020

Vincent Cho and Wing Lam

This study applies self-determination theory to investigate how motivations to participate in LinkedIn would influence a professional's intention to leave an organization…

Abstract

Purpose

This study applies self-determination theory to investigate how motivations to participate in LinkedIn would influence a professional's intention to leave an organization for professional advancement (ILPA).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors randomly sampled 5810 professionals who are actively participating in LinkedIn for at least six months and collected 379 completed questionnaires.

Findings

This study examines the effect of motivation to participate in LinkedIn on ILPA. Perceived autonomy support, perceived competence support and perceived relatedness support have positive influences on intrinsic motivation. Introjected regulation is positively influenced by perceived autonomy and competence support but unaffected by perceived relatedness support. External regulation is positively influenced by perceived autonomy and competence support but has no relationship with perceived relatedness support. ILPA from using LinkedIn is positively influenced by intrinsic motivation, introjected and external regulations.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should consider other professional network sites as well as longitudinal research designs to address external validity and causality issues.

Practical implications

Organizations should understand that professional network sites play an important role for professional advancement. The motivations to participate in professional network sites are supports on autonomy and competence. For platform designers, it is vital to enhance supports on autonomy and competence to sustain users' participation in professional network sites.

Originality/value

This study extends the scope of self-determination theory to understand the motivations to participate in professional network sites, which will have impacts on professionals' ILPA.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 April 2015

Jeffrey C. Wayman, Vincent Cho, Jo Beth Jimerson and Virginia W. Snodgrass Rangel

The effective use of student data has gained increasing attention in the past 10 years. Although district leaders would like to support data use and improvement, exactly…

Abstract

The effective use of student data has gained increasing attention in the past 10 years. Although district leaders would like to support data use and improvement, exactly how to go about such work systemically is often unclear. Accordingly, the aim of this chapter is to illuminate the inner workings of data use throughout a mid-sized school district. In doing so, we highlight issues in how data were used and supported, and provide discussion about how districts such as this one may improve data use throughout the district.

Details

Leading Small and Mid-Sized Urban School Districts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-818-2

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2016

Vincent Cho

As digital devices (e.g., laptops, tablets) have become increasingly ubiquitous, so too has students’ potential for digital distraction. It is yet unknown how teachers and…

Abstract

Purpose

As digital devices (e.g., laptops, tablets) have become increasingly ubiquitous, so too has students’ potential for digital distraction. It is yet unknown how teachers and schools might effectively handle such challenges. Accordingly, this study explores educators’ encounters with digital distraction among students, including their work toward addressing the problem.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed-methods case study drew upon interview and survey data. Data were analyzed to describe educators’ encounters with and problem solving around digital distraction. This included the use of social network analysis. Specifically, a core-periphery model helped illuminate patterns in collaborative problem solving.

Findings

Students’ distractions included online entertainment and sending messages. This added to an overall atmosphere of distractedness in classrooms. Rather than collaborate around digital distraction, teachers tended to handle these issues on their own. If teachers did talk to others, these instances were more likely complaints to leaders than peer-to-peer collaborations.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides a descriptive account of one school and its problem solving around digital distraction. Building upon this study, future research might address the effectiveness of approaches for handling distraction, the influence of network structures on problem solving, and the factors influencing educators’ collaboration around technology.

Originality/value

Digital distraction is a new challenge in schools and in society. This study lays groundwork for understanding and addressing this issue. It also demonstrates one way to apply core-periphery analyses toward understanding problem solving.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2016

Vincent Cho

Although there has been increasing optimism about the potential for social media platforms such as Twitter to support educators’ professional learning, it is yet unclear…

Abstract

Purpose

Although there has been increasing optimism about the potential for social media platforms such as Twitter to support educators’ professional learning, it is yet unclear whether such promises hold true. Accordingly, the purpose of this study is to explore school administrators’ use of Twitter for professional learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative case study draws data collected from 17 school administrators from throughout the United States and Canada. In addition to individual, semi-structured interviews, administrators’ tweets were collected for two weeks. This resulted in 1460 tweets. Analyses were aimed at perceptions about Twitter, the knowledge shared, and its impact on practice.

Findings

Findings presented a paradox: although administrators were enthusiastic about the social and professional benefits associated with Twitter, they did not share or apply much knowledge commonly associated with administrator work. Topically, administrators’ tweets tended to focus on technology, rather than other leadership issues. Also, administrators’ informal tweets focused on norms and relationships in the online community, rather than other dimensions to leadership craft. What’s more, leaders were rarely able to point to direct changes in their school policies or practices resulting from Twitter.

Research limitations/implications

The present study raises issues for future research, including: How do administrators evaluate the expertise of peers or other resources online? How do leaders negotiate conflict or dialogue online? How might leaders leverage social media as public relations tools?

Practical implications

Whereas popular media have described the benefits of platforms like Twitter in broad strokes, the present study provides a detailed account of the practitioner experience. This account includes not only descriptions of what leaders might (or might not) be learning via Twitter, but also some of the benefits of being able to socialize with colleagues online.

Originality/value

As social media use has grown, so has interest in using such platforms for professional learning. However, there is a gap in knowledge regarding the strengths and shortfalls facing administrators. This study breaks new ground by comparing Twitter's purported benefits to user's tweets and outcomes.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration , vol. 54 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Vincent Cho and Xu Huang

Given the increasing influence and importance of professionals in modern society, this study aims to investigate the influence of organizational commitment and…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the increasing influence and importance of professionals in modern society, this study aims to investigate the influence of organizational commitment and professional commitment on professionals' intention to leave their organizations for professional advancement (ILPA).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 500 members of a large Hong Kong association of computer specialists were drawn randomly from the membership list. E‐mails were sent directly to those 500 members through a web‐based survey, which is an effective way to collect confidential information and potentially reduced the resistance due to the survey sensitivity. After two follow‐ups via e‐mail, a total of 265 responses were collected with a response rate of 53 percent.

Findings

The study found that organizational affective commitment (OAC) would be more effective for reducing ILPA. For the interactions between different commitment components, there is a substitution effect of professional affective commitment (PAC) and professional continuance component (PCC) toward their impacts on ILPA.

Research limitations/implications

The findings would be explained by the self‐justification process due to cognitive dissonance on the professional's continuance commitment and his/her affective commitment in an organization. Moreover, there would be a complementary relationship between organizational and professional commitment.

Originality/value

This study would answer the question on how to effectively avoid a professional leaving an organization.

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Vincent Cho and Humphry Hung

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of mobile messaging for the purposes of information sharing and social networking based on the types of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of mobile messaging for the purposes of information sharing and social networking based on the types of social ties involved. The authors identify two psychological traits in the model: perceived time shortages (TSs) and anxiety trait. These traits can influence individuals’ mobile-messaging usage by facilitating users’ connections to different social ties in modern urban life.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors distributed questionnaires at random on the streets of certain densely populated areas in Hong Kong to young urbanites, who are the dominant users of technological social media. The authors collected 492 valid responses, which the authors analysed via multivariate regression analysis.

Findings

Mobile messages are more effectively used to share information within strongly tied groups rather than weakly tied groups. However, there is little difference between weakly and strongly connected groups in terms of the perceived effectiveness of mobile messages used for social networking. Anxious people are more inclined to send mobile messages to individuals with whom they have weak ties, and people who perceived TSs send more mobile messages to individuals with whom they have strong ties.

Research limitations/implications

The rapid nature of information and communication technology has enabled new “richer” forms of mobile media. For instance, WhatsApp allows people to attach images and other multimedia files to their messages, and WeChat provides a location-sharing service that enables users to meet new people based on their friendship preferences. Future studies should examine this trend.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by elaborating the mobile-messaging behaviour of urban citizens who are anxious and perceive TSs within strongly and weakly connected social groups.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 2 April 2015

Abstract

Details

Leading Small and Mid-Sized Urban School Districts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-818-2

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