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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Vincent Obedgiu, Vincent Bagire and Samuel Mafabi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB) among local government civil servants.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB) among local government civil servants.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a cross-sectional survey research design with a response of 239 civil servants in the local government sector; data was collected using a questionnaire and quantitative approaches were used in analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal that there is a significant positive relationship between organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour. The predictive power of organizational commitment on OCB is, however, lower than other similar studies in extant literature. Despite being significant, the coefficient of determination in the final model was very low raising thoughtful concerns hence recommendation for further analytical studies in the local government context in the African setting.

Research limitations/implications

The results in this study cannot be without limitations. The authors take a note of the sector that the authors studied, i.e., local governments, in which the authors may not have contextualized the concepts very well and had challenges of interpretation by the respondents. The authors were also limited by the lack of context-specific literature to underpin our discussion. The paper is also limited by the narrow scope of one region in Uganda and thus generalizability to the African level may be done with caution.

Practical implications

This study provides important implications to policy, practice and research. While policies provide for expected efficiencies and productivity, the authors note that an environment in which these are to be achieved is important when it promotes OCB. Policy makers should bear in mind behavioural elements for affective, normative and continuance commitment.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the body of knowledge by finding further support for the relationship between organizational commitment and OCB, and advances a likely debate that among local government civil servants in a developing country context the predictive power could be very low. This possibly explains the efficiency gaps at this level of state governance.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Kasimu Sendawula, Vincent Bagire, Cathy Ikiror Mbidde and Peter Turyakira

This study aims to examine the relationship between environmental commitment and environmental sustainability practices of manufacturing small and medium enterprises…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between environmental commitment and environmental sustainability practices of manufacturing small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a cross-sectional and correlational design using evidence from 106 manufacturing SMEs in Uganda. Data was analyzed through Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 23.

Findings

Results show that environmental commitment is a significant predictor of environmental sustainability practices and its dimensions which comprise of eco-friendly packaging, energy efficiency, waste management and water conservation of the manufacturing SMEs in Uganda.

Originality/value

This study offers initial evidence on the association between environmental commitment and environmental sustainability practices using evidence from a developing country’s perspective. The results also provide new insights on the relationship between environmental commitment and the dimensions of environmental sustainability practices which comprise of eco-friendly packaging, energy efficiency, waste management and water conservation.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2019

Rogers Mwesigwa, Vincent Bagire, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi and John C. Munene

The purpose of this paper is to assess stakeholder management antecedents in public private partnership (PPP) projects in Uganda.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess stakeholder management antecedents in public private partnership (PPP) projects in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is cross sectional and quantitative in nature. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire survey from a sample of 94 PPP projects in Uganda. Stratified random sampling was used in selecting projects for this study. Smart PLS–SEM was used for analysis.

Findings

Results from the study show that the key antecedents of stakeholder management include; communication, engagement, commitment and trust. Communication was found to be the strongest antecedent of stakeholder management. Results also show that trust and commitment are insignificantly associated with stakeholder management in PPP projects.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to the antecedents of stakeholder management in PPP projects in Uganda. Further studies should be conducted in the public and private sectors where there are also multiple stakeholders.

Practical implications

The paper has documented the antecedents of stakeholder management in PPP projects in Uganda. The results will help project managers and policy makers appreciate the different antecedents of stakeholder management and how they are important in managing interests and expectations of different stakeholders.

Originality/value

This research focused on the key antecedents of stakeholder management in PPP projects within the Ugandan context.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Vincent Bagire, Jolly Byarugaba and Janet Kyogabiirwe

The purpose of this paper is to examine the management and benefits of meetings so as to draw conclusions on their effectiveness in organizations given the increasing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the management and benefits of meetings so as to draw conclusions on their effectiveness in organizations given the increasing discontent about their set up.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was a cross-sectional survey, data were collected from 325 respondents in 22 service organizations in Kampala, using a questionnaire and participant observations; the instrument was tested for reliability and analysis done using descriptive and statistical techniques.

Findings

The key finding was that policy regarding meetings and reasons for convening them jointly account for 57 percent variations in the benefits organizations have. The way meetings are conducted was found to have no significant effect, contrary to anecdotal evidences. The internal and external contextual factors did not affect the effectiveness of meetings. In general meetings have benefited organizations but the discontent on how they are managed is still high.

Research limitations/implications

The lack of analytical and local literature on the study variables limited this study. There were also methodological challenges especially operationalization of variables, sampling and choice of respondents.

Practical implications

The study underpins policy as a key factor for effectiveness of meetings; the literature supported this account. For governance boards there is need to review policy on meetings; and for managers, the paper emphasizes the need for improving how meetings are convened, conducted and the follow up action. The study has provided rich ground for scholars; the authors have extended the debate on meetings, brought into view an African context and made it possible for further studies.

Social implications

Meetings involve many people in the organization and affect entire operations. There are critical personal factors that are pertinent in the outcome of meetings. The finding that personal factors do not have a significant relationship with effectiveness of meetings should not be applauded till further investigations and conceptualization is done in similar contexts. There are social implications on if meetings are not managed well as the authors have established like time wastage, employee motivation and poor management among others.

Originality/value

Many papers that the authors accessed on meetings were on organizational experiences from western countries, the authors have made an original focus on Uganda and underpinned the debate on management development in Africa. The authors have also examined and provided an empirical basis for understanding effectiveness of meetings using key factors of policy, preparation, conduct and contextual factors.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Vincent Bagire

Abstract

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

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Article
Publication date: 25 March 2020

Vincent Obedgiu, Gideon Nkurunziza, Gabriel Simiyu and Bumaali Lubogoyi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the key predictors of organizational citizenship behavior of civil servants in local governments in Uganda.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the key predictors of organizational citizenship behavior of civil servants in local governments in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on a quantitative approach and cross-sectional survey design. Data were collected using a self-administered closed-ended questionnaire from a sample size of 265 respondents derived using Krejcie and Morgan (1970) from a population of 844 civil servants using stratified simple random sampling technique. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS statistical software vs 23 and Hypotheses tested using Hayes (2018) Process Macro v3.2 (Model 4).

Findings

The findings revealed that organizational justice has a significant positive effect on organizational commitment, which impact positively on organizational citizenship behavior of civil servants. The study further reveals an indirect-only mediation where organizational justice affects organizational citizenship behavior through organizational commitment. The study proves that there is no direct relationship such a relationship is enhanced through organizational commitment.

Originality/value

This study contributes to knowledge by providing key information on the predictors of organizational citizenship behavior of civil servants. The indirect-only mediation findings give some new insights into theory and literature. This study has eventually changed the direction of the debate popularly held among previous scholars who believe that organizational justice relates to organizational citizenship behavior. This is relevant in understanding the concept of organizational citizenship behavior and filling the practical gap that exists in Ugandan context.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

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