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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Vince Edwards and Frances Foster

Seeks to assess the impact of “imported” management education on thedevelopment of managers in former command economies of Eastern Europe.In particular, examines the…

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396

Abstract

Seeks to assess the impact of “imported” management education on the development of managers in former command economies of Eastern Europe. In particular, examines the attitudes of Hungarian managers who have completed a British Diploma in Management. Statements made by the managers in their projects were noted against a number of factors, which have previously been found to be characteristic of command and market economies, in an attempt to measure the extent to which the “cognitive maps” of the managers are evolving in response to the new situation. The analysis showed that in some areas the process has begun tentatively, but in a number of aspects is a long way from being fully internalized. The managers appear to have understood the vocabulary without necessarily internalizing the concepts required.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

David Golding

A good deal of attention has been paid recently to the notion of management competence. One of the main strands of this has been promoted by the Council for Management…

Abstract

A good deal of attention has been paid recently to the notion of management competence. One of the main strands of this has been promoted by the Council for Management Education and Development (CMED) in connection with the Management Charter Initiative and as part of the thrust towards developing Chartered Manager status.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 12 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2007

Ruth Alas and Vincent Edwards

The purpose of this paper is to investigate employees' attitudes toward society, organisations and work in electronic industry of the three Finno‐Ugrian countries from an…

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517

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate employees' attitudes toward society, organisations and work in electronic industry of the three Finno‐Ugrian countries from an institutionalist perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey was done in two plants of the electronics industry in Estonia, Hungary and Finland. The survey was conducted in two plants of the electronics industry in Estonia, Hungary and Finland, respectively: one produces telecommunications equipment and the other electrical goods for household use. Data from the three countries were compared by means of the ANOVA‐test. The factors influencing job satisfaction and organisational commitment were identified by using linear regression analysis.

Findings

The results of an empirical study in the three Finno‐Ugrian countries, Estonia, Finland and Hungary, indicate significant differences, as well as similarities, in attitudes toward society, organisations and work in electronic industry of the three Finno‐Ugrian countries. It is argued that the differences in work‐related attitudes are influenced by the respective countries' historical legacy, in particular differences in levels of institutional development.

Research limitations/implications

In order to draw broader conclusions it is necessary to explore alternative explanations and conduct further empirical research in other industries and countries.

Practical implications

Estonia and Hungary are new EU members and their citizens can now seek employment in another member country. The paper gives information about the work‐related attitudes of Estonian and Hungarian employees compared to Finnish employees.

Originality/value

The model developed explains differences between three countries.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Maxim Voronov

As institutional theory increasingly looks to the micro-level for explanations of macro-level institutional processes, institutional scholars need to pay closer attention…

Abstract

As institutional theory increasingly looks to the micro-level for explanations of macro-level institutional processes, institutional scholars need to pay closer attention to the role of emotions in invigorating institutional processes. I argue that attending to emotions is most likely to enrich institutional analysis, if scholars take inspiration from theories that conceptualize emotions as relational and inter-subjective, rather than intra-personal, because the former would be more compatible with institutional theory’s relational roots. I review such promising theories that include symbolic interactionism, psychoanalytic and psychodynamic perspectives, moral psychology, and social movements. I conclude by outlining several possible research questions that might be inspired by attending to the role of emotions in institutional processes. I argue that such research can enrich the understanding of embedded agency, power, and the use of theorization by institutional change agents, as well as introduce a hereto neglected affective facet into the study of institutional logics.

Details

Emotions and the Organizational Fabric
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-939-3

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Vince Bruni‐Bossio and Norman T. Sheehan

As a result of the many governance failures in the past decade, new legislation, increased regulation, and best practices have been adopted by boards in an effort to

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1125

Abstract

Purpose

As a result of the many governance failures in the past decade, new legislation, increased regulation, and best practices have been adopted by boards in an effort to improve corporate governance. Unfortunately, not all of the changes, such as increasing the number of external directors, have favorably impacted the quality of board governance. While having the majority of external directors on a board increases the board's independence from the CEO, these external directors lack inside directors' understanding of the firm's operations, customers and business model. The board members' lack of understanding presents a key challenge to CEOs, as their tenures depend on keeping their boards informed about the firm's business model. If CEOs are to succeed in this new governance climate, they need to find a way to effectively explain the business model to external directors in order to educate them, access their competencies, and ensure their long term support. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of the strategy map to communicate the firm's business model to the board.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used the authors' experiences, a review of the literature, and a case study as a basis for making recommendations presented in the article.

Findings

Outside directors may struggle to understand the firm's business model. While some may argue this is not the CEO's problem as it is the board's role to govern and management's job to manage, the authors argue it is an important issue for CEOs for two reasons: First, if the board does not understand the impact of changes to a firm's business model then CEOs are not fully leveraging their boards' expertise. Second, if CEOs do not keep the board adequately informed about the business model it hinders, rather than helps CEOs from building open and transparent relationships with their boards. By ensuring that directors receive the right information about the organization's business model and then have the opportunity to have a constructive dialog regarding the quality of the business model, CEOs can build trusting relationships with their boards and thus ensure they succeed over the longer term.

Originality/value

Recent governance failures have demonstrated a need for better communication between boards and CEOs. This is one of the first papers to examine the role of the strategy map to communicate the firm's business model to the board.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Karen Corteen

To discuss the regulation of professional wrestling in the USA in order to explore how the business of professional wrestling is regulated and deregulated.

Abstract

Purpose

To discuss the regulation of professional wrestling in the USA in order to explore how the business of professional wrestling is regulated and deregulated.

Approach

Using desk-based research, the regulation and deregulation of professional wrestling will be explored.

Findings

The regulation of professional wrestling in the USA is inconsistent. The extent of regulation and deregulation of professional wrestling is dependent on the state in which the event takes place. Whether regulated or deregulated, professional wrestling is a painful, risky and injurious business wherein the economic health and well-being of the World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) corporation, and the location in which events take place, take precedence over the health and well-being of working sports participants.

Implications

The research is limited to sports participants working in the dominant, visible and therefore arguably most accountable professional wrestling corporation in the USA. Implication of the research is that a more in-depth investigation into the utility of regulation is needed. Additionally, it raises concerns regarding the potential hidden work-related premature deaths, harms and injuries in other promotions in the USA and beyond.

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Karen Corteen

The purpose of this paper is to explore critically the potentially harmful business of professional wrestling in the USA as state-corporate crime.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore critically the potentially harmful business of professional wrestling in the USA as state-corporate crime.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper comprises desk-based research of secondary sources. The lack of official data on the harms experienced by professional wrestlers means that much of the data regarding this is derived from quantitative and qualitative accounts from internet sites dedicated to this issue.

Findings

A major finding is that with regard to the work-related harms experienced by professional wrestlers, the business may not be wholly to be blamed, but nor is it entirely blame free. It proposes that one way the work-related harms can be understood is via an examination of the political economic context of neo-liberalism from the 1980s onwards and subsequent state-corporate actions and inactions.

Practical implications

The paper raises questions about the regulation of the professional wrestling industry together with the misclassification of wrestlers’ worker status (also known as wage theft and tax fraud) and the potential role they play in the harms incurred in this industry.

Social implications

The potential wider social implications of the misclassification of workers are raised.

Originality/value

The originality and value of this paper is the examination of work-related harms within the professional wrestling industry through the lens of state-corporate crime.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2021

John Fenwick

Abstract

Details

Organisational Behaviour in the Public Sector: A Critical Introduction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-421-2

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2019

Doris Schedlitzki

The purpose of this paper is to explore opportunities for delivering sustainable leadership education through critical reflection embedded in the framework of higher and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore opportunities for delivering sustainable leadership education through critical reflection embedded in the framework of higher and degree apprenticeships.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper contributes to leadership development research that focusses on “leader becoming” as an ongoing process of situated learning (in the classroom and everyday work life). The approach to leadership development adopted in this paper proposes that sustainable leadership practices and decision making are developed when leadership learning is firmly embedded in work-based practices and critical self-reflection.

Findings

The discussion of critical reflection methods focusses on utilising the learning portfolio as a core aspect of all leadership and management apprenticeships to embed sustainable and reflective practice and facilitate situated leadership learning. The paper explores the role of training providers in actively connecting higher and degree apprenticeships to embed this model of leadership development and seeing leadership as a lifelong apprenticeship. It also highlights the potential for resistance by managers and senior leaders in seeing themselves as apprentices rather than accomplished leaders. By paying attention to issues of language and identity in this discussion, it will surface practical implications for the delivery of sustainable leadership education through the framework of apprenticeships.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the theoretical and practical understanding of sustainable leadership education by exploring opportunities for re-framing leadership development as a lifelong apprenticeship focussed on personal and professional development. Recognising the resistance that often exists to reflective practice within leadership development contexts, this paper further explores ways of dealing with such resistance.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

David E. Williams, Elly-Jean Nielsen, Melanie A. Morrison and Todd G. Morrison

This study aims to explore the perceptions and reactions of men, who participate in a female-dominated online consumption space. It looked at the process of men…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the perceptions and reactions of men, who participate in a female-dominated online consumption space. It looked at the process of men, (re)negotiating their digital gendered identity on Pinterest.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory-light approach was taken. Data were collected through 21 one-on-one semi-structured interviews with male Pinterest users. Subsequently, data were extensively coded and analyzed for the key themes and patterns.

Findings

Three core categories emerged, which speak to the ways men account for their practices on Pinterest as autonomous online agents. These categories were: awareness of Pinterest as a feminized digital space; limited sociality due to the solitary use of Pinterest (the exception being when collaborating with an intimate partner); and performed identities (k = 4) serving to justify the men’s activities on a female-dominated social networking site.

Research limitations/implications

The findings establish a firm theoretical basis for understanding male Pinterest users as autonomous online agents. However, reflective of this relatively small, exploratory qualitative project, the process-based interview questions did not render, particularly, long or rich narratives. Future qualitative research might endeavor to ask deeper, more open-ended questions.

Originality/value

This is an original study of men’s use of Pinterest. Research on the identity projects of men entering fields traditionally occupied by women and coded as feminine is established, there is a lack of understanding of how gender identity is (re)constructed digitally, especially on social media.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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