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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Sari Jusi and Maarit Virtanen

Water resources development plays a central role in reducing poverty and achieving sustainable economic growth in Laos. The development of irrigation is vital for the…

Abstract

Water resources development plays a central role in reducing poverty and achieving sustainable economic growth in Laos. The development of irrigation is vital for the rural population dependent on agricultural production, but irrigation projects have suffered from low levels of maintenance, as farmers have felt little ownership for the government projects. At the moment, a process of Irrigation Management Transfer (IMT) is undertaken in Laos with the aim of transferring the management and operation of schemes to farmers. This article aims at evaluating, how IMT has been implemented in Laos and how it is affecting the sustainability of agriculture.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Inpaeng Sayvaya and Phouphet Kyophilavong

– The purpose of this study is to examine whether the village development fund (VDF) program reduces poverty in terms of income and expenditure.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine whether the village development fund (VDF) program reduces poverty in terms of income and expenditure.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use cross-sectional data that are collected from 361 households in 15 villages in the rural district of Sukhuma of Champasak province in 2012 and use regression for analysis.

Findings

The estimate of the empirical model that is used for the econometric analysis is based on the model constructed by Coleman (1999). This study finds that VDF program has a positive impact on household income and expenditure but that the impact is statistically insignificant.

Research limitations/implications

The authors conclude that the VDF program has a minimal impact on poverty reduction in the study area.

Practical implications

Policy-maker should be aware that promotion of the VDF program might not reduce poverty in terms of income and expenditure.

Social implications

This finding might have significant impacts on poverty reduction strategy of Lao PDR.

Originality/value

It is the first study to investigate the impact of the VDF program on poverty in Lao PDR.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Nafisa Priti Sanga and Rajeev Kumar Ranjan

Addressing probable complexities of climate change on rural livelihoods, food security, and poverty reduction, requires mainstreaming of cross-sectoral interventions and…

Abstract

Purpose

Addressing probable complexities of climate change on rural livelihoods, food security, and poverty reduction, requires mainstreaming of cross-sectoral interventions and adaptations into existing frameworks. Indigenous communities due to their isolation, reluctance to current practices, and knowledge deprivation are difficult to reach by many developmental programs. The purpose of this paper is to identify relevant adaptations from indigenous rural Jharkhand (India), applicable to improving livelihoods through integrated natural resource management (NRM). Prospects of rainwater harvest and management for supporting local rural livelihoods were also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Tested and applicable models of participatory research methods widespread in sociological research were used. Focussed group discussions and structured interviews were conducted for primary data collection from micro-watershed units of this study.

Findings

In-situ soil and water conservation methods showed increased availabilities of freshwater both for food and non-food consumption in the area. Construction of rural infrastructure and land husbandry practices improved agricultural productivity and resulted in subsequent reductions in women's drudgeries. Culture fishery provided ample scope for livelihood diversification, food and nutrition security of households. Overall, micro-watershed area developmental approach improved food and nutrition securities, generated employment opportunities, improved agricultural productivity, diversified livelihoods and were widely accepted by communities.

Originality/value

Creating greater sense of ownership among grass-root communities was an important thrust behind the success of this particular project. By entrusting tribal communities with fund management, rural planning, and execution of various interventions, a successful replicable model was produced, which has wider community implications extending beyond societies and geographies.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Nafisa Priti Sanga and Rajeev Kumar Ranjan

The purpose of this paper is to study Indian aspects of policy convergence in the context of budgetary linkage of two nationalized flagship programs – Mahatma Gandhi…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study Indian aspects of policy convergence in the context of budgetary linkage of two nationalized flagship programs – Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA) and Integrated Watershed Management Program (IWMP). Therefore, in lieu of inter-departmental convergences; issues related to water resource development of Jharkhand’s (India) rain-fed areas were addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

Centered on policy convergence strategy, present study applied comprehensive review and analysis approach for formulation of research base. A conceptual framework was thus designed for analytical purposes and therefore advancing toward conjectural knowledge base.

Findings

Application of inter-departmental policy convergence strategy suggested ample opportunities for optimal water resource development. Presence of abundant wage labor, rich indigenous water management techniques, tested replicable models, under-harvested rainwater potential, etc., appeared as catalysts of policy convergence. Yet, State’s lack of inter-departmental coordination and grass-root institutional framework will continually challenge policy convergences in absence of good governance.

Originality/value

An initiative of Indian government; MGNREGA has received international attention due to its wider coverage including natural resource management, besides guaranteed wage employment. Targeted at freshwater management discourse of Jharkhand; present paper reviewed prospective inter-departmental policy convergence strategy within various arena of MGNREGA, by exploring associated scopes and challenges. Similarly for cost effectiveness, related to maintenance and lift-irrigation demands of rain-fed area development; the present study suggested optimum utilization of inter-departmental funding linkages for development of sustainable water resources.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Xi Jiao, Yuan Zheng and Zhen Liu

A better understanding of the processes that shape households’ adaptation decisions is essential for developing pertinent policies locally, thereby enabling better…

Abstract

Purpose

A better understanding of the processes that shape households’ adaptation decisions is essential for developing pertinent policies locally, thereby enabling better adaptation across scales and multiple stakeholders. This paper aims to examine the determinants of household decisions to adapt, it is also possible to target factors that facilitate or constrain adaptation. This helps to identify key components of current adaptive capacity, which leads to important insights into households’ competence to adapt in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a full-pledged approach examining factors and processes that shape households’ climate adaptation decision-making in rural Cambodia at three levels: adaptation status, adaptation intensity and choices of adaptation strategy. The three-stage analyses are materialized by applying the double hurdle model and multivariate probit model, which provides a potential way to systematically assess household adaptation decision-making in rural settings.

Findings

Results show a high level of involvement in adaptation among local households who are facing multiple stressors including climatic risks. The findings suggest that perceived climate change influence households’ decisions in both adaptation status and intensity. Access to financial credit, farmland size, water availability and physical asset holdings are identified as key factors promoting the adoption of more adaptation measures. To facilitate adaptation, collective effort and support at community level is important in providing knowledge based climate information dissemination and early warning systems. Public sector support and development aid programs should focus on positive triggers for targeted community and household adaptation.

Originality/value

The study, to the authors’ best knowledge, is one of the first studies to investigate the determinants of local adaptation decision-making systematically in Cambodia. It also provides a comprehensive approach to improve understanding of adaptation decision-making processes by exploring how various capital assets are associated with different stages of adaptation decisions. The findings contribute to policy implications enlightening adaptation planning at multi-scales with knowledge of key factors, which enhance local adaptive capacity to reduce climate change vulnerability.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Christiane Kirketerp de Viron and György Mudri

The concept of smart village emerged in the European Union (EU) level policy debates on rural development in 2016, following the stakeholder-driven Cork 2.0 Declaration…

Abstract

The concept of smart village emerged in the European Union (EU) level policy debates on rural development in 2016, following the stakeholder-driven Cork 2.0 Declaration. It was developed through a pilot project initiative on ‘Smart, Eco, Social Villages’ and spelled out in the ‘EU Action for Smart Villages’ initiative.

While the concept of smart villages remains unclear for many, substantial work has been carried out to develop the concept and to prepare the underlying supporting instruments at the EU level over the last three years.

The aim of this chapter is to give an overview of how the concept of smart villages has evolved at the EU level and to draw some recommendations for future policy work. The chapter reveals difficulties in the utilization efficiency of the EU funds in rural areas and shows a patched landscape of fragmented policy instruments. The key arguments are that while the mixture of these tools is important, the glue that binds them together is still missing, and that the general utilization efficiency is not sufficient. The authors offer a set of five recommendations for the short to medium term, which is needed for the successful implementation of the smart approach: integration, simplification, communication, innovation, and ‘rural proofing.’

Details

Smart Villages in the EU and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-846-8

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Masudul Alam Choudhury, Mohammad Shahadat Hossain and Mohammad Solaiman

The paper's purpose is to present and empirically validate a learning model of participatory grassroots development among the poor and needy in Bangladesh.

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2054

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's purpose is to present and empirically validate a learning model of participatory grassroots development among the poor and needy in Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach used is conceptual modeling and its empirical validation for a case study of poor women's sewing project in an interior village of Chittagong, Bangladesh.

Findings

A perpetual charity‐fund with endogenous values and productive transformation of the needy at the grassroots can prove to be an effective approach to socioeconomic development.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical validation can be enhanced with more data being generated with experience in the women's sewing project in the near future.

Practical implications

This is a policy‐oriented paper with practical ways and means‐test for implementation in development planning.

Originality/value

A formal modeling of grassroots development premised on human resource development and perpetual charity‐fund for financing and their empirical validation is presented. Such an approach is not presently found in the hierarchical models of development planning. It should be included for making development meaningful as the grassroots. Particular reference is made here to Bangladesh development planning.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 28 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Enrique Nieto and Pedro Brosei

Over recent decades, rural areas have been facing significant challenges that exacerbate the existing discontent in their communities. These challenges are mostly…

Abstract

Over recent decades, rural areas have been facing significant challenges that exacerbate the existing discontent in their communities. These challenges are mostly reflected in depopulation trends, increased vulnerability to external shocks, and reduced quality of basic services. Local Action Groups (LAGs) all over Europe have been working on these challenges since the early 1990s. More recently, the smart villages concept is starting to generate enthusiasm among rural development stakeholders to try to revert these trends by supporting communities to move toward a more sustainable future while taking advantage of new emerging opportunities. This chapter demonstrates that the LEADER approach and its principles are also part of the smart villages concept. However, practical differences between the two emerge as a result of limitations imposed by restrictive LEADER regulatory frameworks in many member states. Our main argument is that LEADER has what is needed to be the main tool for driving smart villages in Europe as long as there is a policy framework in place that enables LEADER to exploit its full potential. This conclusion is grounded on the analysis of the role that LEADER played in a number of smart village initiatives across the EU.

Details

Smart Villages in the EU and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-846-8

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Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Xénia Szanyi-Gyenes

Smart village is a new concept and it may be the key to the European rural future. To create an operative smart system for smart villages, it needs the participation of…

Abstract

Smart village is a new concept and it may be the key to the European rural future. To create an operative smart system for smart villages, it needs the participation of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). In the smart villages concept local needs require real local solutions; a kind of ‘I can do this for you’ philosophy. SMEs, especially microenterprises or, even, self-employed individuals, have the potential and the capacity to develop local solutions to local problems and have the flexibility to think on a very microlevel. New ideas are needed for the smart villages, new solutions, and new perspectives. The potential of success is in the SMEs, indeed. Because it is not enough to create a system, it must be operated too. Small businesses can ensure the effective functioning of smart villages.

The idea of smart villages is about people. It is intended that the rural population should be able to use all modern technological tools and get closer to the services common in an urban environment. The question is how to make rural life attractive, especially for the young generations. To this end we need smooth connections by broadband Internet and enhanced potential for mobility. It is also a social and ecological project that is driven by public efforts assisted by larger budgetary means or in the case of the EU by a good coordination of the various development funds with broader rural development goals. However, we should not believe that SMEs operating in small settlements are to become more competitive than those in big business hubs. It is needed to acknowledge that matching urban/rural balances is a matter of financial solidarity; thus, we can keep our landscapes soundly populated and protected.

Details

Smart Villages in the EU and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-846-8

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Hafiez Sofyani, Suryo Pratolo and Zakiah Saleh

This study aims to examine the determinants of accountability and transparency of Indonesian village government(s), namely, the competence and organisational commitment of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the determinants of accountability and transparency of Indonesian village government(s), namely, the competence and organisational commitment of village government staff, and the consequences of accountability and transparency for village community trust.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was conducted in village governments in the province of the Special Region of Yogyakarta, covering four regencies: Sleman, Bantul, Kulon Progo and Gunung Kidul. A total of 128 village governments participated in this research. Data were collected by distributing a questionnaire survey, and a partial least squares technique was used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The study revealed that village government staff's competence and organisational commitment are positively associated with accountability. However, organisational commitment and accountability are not associated with transparency. In addition, it was discovered that transparency is positively associated with village community trust but accountability is not.

Originality

By testing the determinants and consequences of accountability and transparency following the ratification of the new village law regulating village government governance, this study is, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, pioneering research.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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