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Article

Vikki Pollard, Andrew Vincent and Emily Wilson

– This paper aims to explore the pedagogical approach of two higher education programmes aiming to develop both discipline-specific and key employability skills in graduates.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the pedagogical approach of two higher education programmes aiming to develop both discipline-specific and key employability skills in graduates.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents two case studies of degree programs in the broad field of the creative industries and focusses on the innovative pedagogy adopted based on a “learning to be” approach (McWilliam, 2008).

Findings

The two case studies describe a different type of pedagogy taken up at one mixed-sector institution over two degree programs. The degrees offered within this institution are recognised as being vocationally oriented yet productive of the higher-order skills expected of degree programs. The case studies illustrate this through a pedagogy designed to orientate the students towards the development of a sense of identity whilst also placing them within the broader professional context of the discipline.

Practical implications

The paper has practical implications for educators in the field and points towards the need to consider the broader professional context of the students in the course design and review phases of programmes in the creative industries.

Originality/value

It is hoped the findings will be useful to educators and curriculum developers in other creative industries’ higher education programs with a vocational orientation to inform future course design, review and planning.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Article

Vikki A. Entwistle, Ian S. Watt and Amanda J. Sowden

The idea that patients should be informed about the benefits and risks of treatment options and involved in decisions about their care is, to many people, appealing and…

Abstract

The idea that patients should be informed about the benefits and risks of treatment options and involved in decisions about their care is, to many people, appealing and sensible. However, it has important implications. This paper briefly considers two motivations for involving patients in clinical decisions and explores some of the issues raised by these. It then makes some practical suggestions for those wanting to provide information to support patient involvement. The paper emphasizes that although the provision of more good‐quality information to patients is widely accepted to be a priority, it is not always a straightforward matter and warrants critical consideration. Substantial resources may be needed if it is to be done well.

Details

Journal of Clinical Effectiveness, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-5874

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Article

Alison Fuller, Vanessa Beck and Lorna Unwin

Gender segregation has been a persistent feature of apprenticeship programmes in countries around the world. In the UK, the Modern Apprenticeship was launched ten years…

Abstract

Purpose

Gender segregation has been a persistent feature of apprenticeship programmes in countries around the world. In the UK, the Modern Apprenticeship was launched ten years ago as the government's flagship initiative for training new entrants in a range of occupational sectors. One of its priorities was to increase male and female participation in “non‐traditional” occupations, that is, those normally practised by just one sex. However, recent figures show that the programme has failed to achieve its aim and this has prompted an investigation by the Equal Opportunities Commission. This paper aims to report the research as part of this investigation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents quantitative and qualitative evidence on the attitudes of young people (aged 14 and 15) and employers to non‐traditional occupational choices. It also explores the factors affecting the decisions of young people to train in a non‐traditional occupation and the recruitment decisions of employers from “traditional sectors”, such as engineering, the construction trades and child care.

Findings

The research provides evidence of the deeply entrenched nature of occupational stereotypes and the psychological and social barriers that have to be overcome if a more evenly balanced workforce is to be created. It also reveals that none of the institutions and organisations which act as gatekeepers between young people and employers is, as yet, taking responsibility for challenging their perceptions and decision‐making processes.

Originality/value

The paper concludes by highlighting the implications of the research findings to stakeholders and suggesting a holistic approach to tackling gender segregation.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 47 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article

Linda Miller

This paper aims to report findings from a UK study funded by the Equal Opportunities Commission to explore gender segregation in apprenticeships in five strongly…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report findings from a UK study funded by the Equal Opportunities Commission to explore gender segregation in apprenticeships in five strongly segregated sectors: construction, plumbing, engineering, information technology (all strongly male‐dominated), and child care (female‐dominated). The aim of the research was to consider the nature of the barriers preventing young people moving into apprenticeships in these areas of work and to investigate the actions that have been taken by local Learning and Skills Councils to address gender segregation in apprenticeships.

Design/methodology/approach

The research consisted of a survey of Local Learning and Skill Councils (the bodies that fund all post‐16 learning provision outside higher education in the UK), case study interviews in five geographical regions selected as examples of good practice, and interviews with representatives of Sector Skill Councils.

Findings

This paper reports some of the barriers encountered by organisations involved in encouraging young people to enter vocational training and by apprentices themselves, and the actions that organisations have taken to try to encourage more diverse groups of young people to consider apprenticeships in these sectors.

Originality/value

This paper is of importance to those wishing to encourage young people to enter into vocational training.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 47 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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