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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Dong Hee Shin

This research provides a contextual analysis of the introduction of a distributed inter‐organizational system (DIOS) in three organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

This research provides a contextual analysis of the introduction of a distributed inter‐organizational system (DIOS) in three organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory case study was conducted to assess the user reactions and the consequences of implementing a videoconferencing system in the organizations.

Findings

Respondents reported radically different experiences with the DIOS videoconferencing. Activity theory is used as a framework for analyzing the organizational context at the three sites and exploring the consequences of using the system. It describes a range of human activities and innovation underlying the inter‐organizational work process and suggests that deficiencies in actors' activity of the process limit the value of DIOS process.

Research limitations/implications

A context‐sensitive research approach to explain the DIOS design and use shows how human activities are included into DIOS. Meso level focus of activity analysis suggests an implication for IOS literature which supplements the findings from activity theory. The paper concludes by examining extant theorizing about innovation and suggests points of departure suggested by the conceptual frame.

Practical implications

The research provides a valuable reference for DIOS designers in particular public organizations' process innovation. It further gives a lesson that DIOS design engages not only technical innovations, but also accompanies significant organizational changes.

Originality/value

This research contributes to DIOS planning research by clarifying the relations of the DIOS planning process and its consequences. It further clarifies the environmental and organizational factors in terms of political economy perspective identified by previous IOS research.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Johannes M. Basch, Klaus G. Melchers, Julia Kegelmann and Leonie Lieb

Videoconference interviews and asynchronous interviews are increasingly used to select applicants. However, recent research has found that technology-mediated interviews…

Abstract

Purpose

Videoconference interviews and asynchronous interviews are increasingly used to select applicants. However, recent research has found that technology-mediated interviews are less accepted by applicants compared to face-to-face (FTF) interviews. The reasons for these differences have not yet been clarified. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to take a closer look at potential reasons that have been suggested in previous research.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study surveyed 154 working individuals who answered questions concerning their perceptions of FTF, videoconference and asynchronous interviews in terms of perceived fairness, social presence and the potential use of impression management (IM) tactics. Furthermore, potential attitudinal and personality correlates were also measured.

Findings

Technology-mediated interviews were perceived as less fair than FTF interviews and this difference was stronger for asynchronous interviews than for videoconference interviews. The perceived social presence and the possible use of IM followed the same pattern. Furthermore, differences in fairness perceptions were mediated by perceived social presence and the possible use of IM tactics. Additionally, affinity for technology and core self-evaluations correlated positively with perceptions of videoconference interviews but not with those of FTF and asynchronous interviews.

Originality/value

This is the first study to compare fairness perceptions of FTF, videoconference and asynchronous interviews and to confirm previous assumptions that potential applicants perceive technology-mediated interviews as less favorable because of impairments in social presence and the potential use of IM.

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Gregg Harry Rawlings, Christopher Gaskell, Keeley Rolling and Nigel Beail

The novel coronavirus and associated restrictions have resulted in mental health services across the UK having to adapt how they deliver psychological assessments and…

Abstract

Purpose

The novel coronavirus and associated restrictions have resulted in mental health services across the UK having to adapt how they deliver psychological assessments and interventions. The purpose of this paper is to explore the accessibility and prospective acceptability of providing telephone and videoconference-mediated psychological interventions in individuals with intellectual disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a service evaluation, a mixed-methods questionnaire was developed and completed by clients who had been referred for psychological therapy at an adult intellectual disabilities’ community health service in the north of England. All clients were assessed using the Red/Amber/Green (RAG) system by a consultant clinical psychologist for risk and potential suitability for indirect service delivery given their ability and needs.

Findings

Overall, 22 clients were invited to take part, of which, only seven (32%) were accepting of telephone or videoconference-mediated psychological therapy. Most of the clients were unable to engage in video-conference therapy and therefore, only suitable for phone therapy. This paper presents the remaining findings and discusses the clinical implications and unique considerations for intellectual disability services drawing on the existing literature.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that the authors are aware of, examining videoconference-mediated psychological therapy in this population. It is hoped the data will be used to help inform practice or policy when using such therapeutic approaches in adults with an intellectual disability.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Nancy Pyrini, Orestes Johns Varonis and Evangeline Marlos Varonis

The purpose of this paper is to report the implementation and outcomes of the “Open Wings” project, a continuing effort to create a community of self-directed elementary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the implementation and outcomes of the “Open Wings” project, a continuing effort to create a community of self-directed elementary school learners and to enhance their homonomy. Technology-enhanced international videoconference presentations resulted in both knowledge gains and attitude changes. These, in turn, inspired creative, collaborative interdisciplinary projects through which students demonstrated that they could embed themselves in contexts that contribute to homonomous identification and development.

Design/methodology/approach

Over the 2015-2016 school year, interactive international videoconferences were delivered to first and sixth grade classrooms in two elementary schools in Athens, Greece. Topics included a personal immigration story and responsible citizenship. Impact was measured quantitatively by a pre-test/post-test design that measured changes in knowledge and attitudes and qualitatively by student group projects at six stations inspired by e-reflect methodology.

Findings

Students demonstrated gains in factual knowledge and changes in attitudes toward immigrants and refugees. Individual and group work at each station revealed that they could plan, research, and present projects that demonstrated their personal sense of self and their place in the community.

Originality/value

With many in Greece directly affected by the economic crisis and an influx of refugees and immigrants, students feel they have no control over their lives and become fearful of outsiders. Even when resources are limited, innovative use of learning technologies can help educate students in the prescribed curriculum and guide them beyond hopelessness to see themselves as empowered individuals who can enrich their own lives and those of their communities.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Book part
Publication date: 19 March 2013

Stephanie E. Raible and Wayne Jacoby

The chapter presents findings from five qualitative reports from educators within the compulsory education sector who have partnered with a United Nations-recognized…

Abstract

The chapter presents findings from five qualitative reports from educators within the compulsory education sector who have partnered with a United Nations-recognized, nongovernmental organization (NGO), Global Education Motivators (GEM), in order to either introduce or expand curricular support for their students or to engage in professional dialogue with fellow educators facilitated through international videoconferencing programs. Through a long-standing collaboration between these educators, GEM has jointly developed programming which educates students on the United Nations and global issues including sustainability, human rights, child labor, poverty, and peace and conflict studies. Using an email-based survey questionnaire, the reported cases aim to explore the educators’ motivations to introduce and expand their students’ global engagement through the media of videoconferencing. The chapter highlights the potential outcomes of international videoconferencing for educators as a classroom tool or a professional development resource, as well as detailing a case study of an NGO–college partnership in which the NGO provides expertise, student internships, and noncredit professional development opportunities to its campus community and beyond.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention using Multimedia Technologies: Video Annotation, Multimedia Applications, Videoconferencing and Transmedia Storytelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-514-2

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Bente Meyer

This study aims to present findings from an ongoing study in three rural schools in Denmark where videoconferences are used as part of the teaching at lower secondary…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present findings from an ongoing study in three rural schools in Denmark where videoconferences are used as part of the teaching at lower secondary level. The research focuses on how students learn from videoconferences that are both one-to-many and peer-to-peer. Videoconferencing, conceptualized by the schools in question as telepresence, is performed in a unique combination of desktop interaction through mobile devices (iPads) and studio-based large screen lectures and interaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data have been collected through multi-sited ethnography, which has contributed to mapping relationships between schools and studying their collaboration through telepresence. As collaboration between schools is built into the project, multi-sited ethnography has followed telepresence as a phenomenon that emerges within these collaborations, i.e. the idea is that looking at it from one locality is only seeing it partially.

Findings

Preliminary results from the project suggest that schools need to work more on organizational frameworks for collaboration and that synchronous connections could be extended through asynchronous communication to support the potential of collaboration via telepresence with iPads.

Research limitations/implications

The study has followed schools for two years in the initial development phase, but can be further qualified by following the next phase of the project, which will be initiated in the Autumn of 2015.

Practical implications

The study has implications for the development of telepresence practices in which mobile devices are used in home classrooms and combined with stationary devices in auditoriums. In addition to this, the study provides examples of how schools can collaborate through telepresence activities in which both teacher-driven and student-driven activities are involved.

Originality/value

The study fulfils a need for knowledge about ways in which telepresence and videoconferencing is used in elementary education and for different educational goals.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Mark Wolfe

The purpose of this article is to augment evaluation of the effectiveness of broadband videoconferencing among distributed research teams.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to augment evaluation of the effectiveness of broadband videoconferencing among distributed research teams.

Design/methodology/approach

Textual output from informal interaction in videoconferencing and chat room sessions was recorded and analyzed using qualitative and content analysis methods to test for knowledge processes thought to be embedded in informal collaborative interaction. An exit survey used nominal and ordinal data categories to measure participant perceptions of using videoconferencing technologies to enhance knowledge‐based collaboration. Indicators of informal interaction and knowledge processes were drawn from the knowledge management (KM) and videoconferencing literatures.

Findings

Analysis confirms communication and informal interaction dynamics supportive of knowledge creation and transfer. A summary assessment of the research addresses barriers identified in the study and suggests approaches for future KM research in video‐mediated research domain.

Research limitations/implications

Project time and resource constraints imposed research limits in terms of inter‐coder reliability and attention to several human factors and behavioral considerations highlighted in the study. The latter, however, are suggestive of further research opportunities, specifically in terms of user expectations and cultures of use of videoconferencing in the organizational setting.

Practical implications

The research provides a template for communications‐based evaluation of advanced applications using broadband technology and collaborative workwares.

Originality/value

The paper is a first‐of‐its‐kind evaluation of true broadband videoconferencing that advanced a knowledge management perspective based on human communication dynamics over a normative information technology framework.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2019

Markus Langer, Cornelius J. König, Diana Ruth-Pelipez Sanchez and Sören Samadi

The technological evolution of job interviews continues as highly automated interviews emerge as alternative approaches. Initial evidence shows that applicants react…

Abstract

Purpose

The technological evolution of job interviews continues as highly automated interviews emerge as alternative approaches. Initial evidence shows that applicants react negatively to such interviews. Additionally, there is emerging evidence that contextual influences matter when investigating applicant reactions to highly automated interviews. However, previous research has ignored higher-level organizational contexts (i.e. which kind of organization uses the selection procedure) and individual differences (e.g. work experience) regarding applicant reactions. The purpose of this paper is to investigate applicant reactions to highly automated interviews for students and employees and the role of the organizational context when using such interviews.

Design/methodology/approach

In a 2 × 2 online study, participants read organizational descriptions of either an innovative or an established organization and watched a video displaying a highly automated or a videoconference interview. Afterwards, participants responded to applicant reaction items.

Findings

Participants (n=148) perceived highly automated interviews as more consistent but as conveying less social presence. The negative effect on social presence diminished organizational attractiveness. The organizational context did not affect applicant reactions to the interview approaches, whereas differences between students and employees emerged but only affected privacy concerns to the interview approaches.

Research limitations/implications

The organizational context seems to have negligible effects on applicant reactions to technology-enhanced interviews. There were only small differences between students and employees regarding applicant reactions.

Practical implications

In a tense labor market, hiring managers need to be aware of a trade-off between efficiency and applicant reactions regarding technology-enhanced interviews.

Originality/value

This study investigates high-level contextual influences and individual differences regarding applicant reactions to highly automated interviews.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Line Lundvoll Nilsen

Videoconferencing between general practitioners and hospitals has been developed to provide higher quality health care services in Norway by promoting interaction between…

Abstract

Purpose

Videoconferencing between general practitioners and hospitals has been developed to provide higher quality health care services in Norway by promoting interaction between levels of care. This article aims to explore the use of videoconferencing for information exchange and consultation throughout the patient trajectory and to investigate how collaboration affects learning and the patient's treatment.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach was interaction analysis supplemented by interviews. Medical discussions concerning the patient were observed for 15 days, creating a trajectory of seven videoconferences. Interviews were conducted to examine the collaboration.

Findings

General practitioners and specialists use a different repertoire of knowledge and experiences to report and consult throughout the course of treatment. Over time, new medical problems arose, and the treatment had to be adjusted. The activity remained continuous and contributed to an integrated knowledge and information exchange. Collaboration using videoconferencing across levels of care created opportunities for workplace learning in health services and can lead to continuity, improved coordination, and a higher quality of care.

Originality/value

In contrast to other studies, which state effects, the need for continuity and cooperation in health care, and the ways in which individual differences make it difficult to achieve seamless health care services, this study offers insight into how continuity and cooperation can be achieved. It includes both observations of interactions and interviews of the participants, providing analysis of collaborative work in situ. This provides insight into the content of the interaction over time as a resource for understanding the outcome of the use of technology and improving health care.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Edurne Martínez‐Moreno, Pilar González‐Navarro, Ana Zornoza and Pilar Ripoll

The purpose of this paper is to examine which communication contexts – virtual or traditional interactions – is more disruptive or beneficial to the effects of intragroup…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine which communication contexts – virtual or traditional interactions – is more disruptive or beneficial to the effects of intragroup conflicts on team performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A laboratory experiment was conducted comparing 22 face‐to‐face (FTF) teams, 22 videoconference (VC) teams and 22 computer‐mediated communication (CMC) teams over a month.

Findings

Results showed that VC teams are the highest performing teams and CMC teams the lowest. However, when task conflict increases VC team performance diminishes at the first stage of the teamwork. FTF team performance is also improved by task conflict, but also by process conflict. After a period where team members develop teamwork experience, relationship conflict and process conflict damage more seriously team performance in CMC teams than in FTF teams. In conclusion, traditional teams and virtual teams behave in different ways, but also there are differences between VC and CMC teams.

Research limitations/implications

This study concludes with a discussion of the obtained results in terms of their implications for traditional and virtual team managers, taking into account the limitations provided by the student sample used.

Originality/value

The paper sheds light on the beneficial impact of task conflict and process conflict on team performance in traditional contexts in several stages of teamwork, and it provides new evidence for hopeful expectations for virtual teams.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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