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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Deidre M Le Fevre

Much enthusiasm exists for using video in teacher education and professional development. As this volume attests to, video-based resources are being used in a variety of…

Abstract

Much enthusiasm exists for using video in teacher education and professional development. As this volume attests to, video-based resources are being used in a variety of teacher-learning contexts. Many educators are discussing their use of video; however, a problem receiving less attention is what it takes to design usable video-based curriculum for teacher learning. This chapter addresses a specific problem faced in using video as a tool for teacher professional development. The problem that is often overlooked is that video in of itself is not a curriculum. We cannot consider video a curriculum perhaps anymore than we can consider a whiteboard and markers a curriculum. Video is rather a medium which can be developed into a resource and used in specific ways to enhance learning. Video can become a part of a curriculum for learning if it is designed to be used in intentional ways towards intentional learning goals. The question then is – what does it take to actually assemble a usable video-based curriculum for teacher learning? Answering this question demands consideration of what and how teachers are intended to learn with this curriculum, and what opportunities the medium of video affords.

Details

Using Video in Teacher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-232-0

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Fahad Ahmed Otaif

With the growing use of technology in second language learning (L2), many techniques of incorporating digital video in L2 learning and platforms of task implementation…

Abstract

Purpose

With the growing use of technology in second language learning (L2), many techniques of incorporating digital video in L2 learning and platforms of task implementation appear in the field, however, with little, if any, research on how tasks can be designed and developed in these contexts. Based on Chapelle (2001, 2014) task design criteria, the current paper evaluates specifically the “interactivity” of task design interface and how it may contribute towards either dispersing or directing the learners' attention (Robinson, 2011) during the process of task completion in video-based L2 listening.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative approach – mainly focus groups and interviews – the current study evaluated a number of tasks that were used for computer-based L2 listening when digital video is the mode of presentation. The participants, i.e. English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers and learners, were presented with a number of task designs to try and evaluate.

Findings

The findings revealed that some task designs are perceived to be less interactive and can disperse the learner's attentional resources during the process of task completion. They also shed light on the importance of improving EFL teachers' current practices of task design in computer-based L2 listening.

Originality/value

This paper has contributed to our growing understanding of interactivity in relation to video-based learning and its task designs.

Details

Saudi Journal of Language Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-243X

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Dawn Surgenor, Christopher McLaughlin, Una McMahon-Beattie and Amy Burns

The aim of this research is to examine the impact of video-based learning on the cooking skills development of students. More specifically, exploring the first stages in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to examine the impact of video-based learning on the cooking skills development of students. More specifically, exploring the first stages in the learning process through embedding declarative knowledge utilising both video content and learner profiles, with the purpose to make teaching practice more effectively and efficiently targeted.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative social experimental approach was employed. The sample consisted of 414 students from three post primary schools in Northern Ireland. Students were randomly allocated into both control and experimental video content groups. All participants were made aware of ethical procedures and the nature of the study.

Findings

Through the application of latent class analysis (LCA), three distinct types of students were classified. Class one (n = 250) students were termed independent learners, class two (n = 88) students were motivated and benefited from video-based learning and class three (n = 52) students demonstrated an inability to apply information because video did not assist in embedding declarative knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

Implications from this research inform content generation for video-based cooking skills.

Practical implications

Given the unprecedented move towards online teaching in 2020 due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) restrictions, there is increasing interest in targeting resources effectively to meet the requirements of all learning groups. This paper fulfils an identified need to study how video impacts on skills development and learning within specific learning typologies.

Originality/value

This research will be of interest to educationalists in promoting a cost-effective resource in line with constructivist values to streamline and meet the needs of individual learners.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Patrick Mikalef, Ilias O. Pappas and Michail Giannakos

Video-based learning (VBL) is gaining increased attention as an educational means in settings such as the flipped classroom and massive open online courses. The value of…

Abstract

Purpose

Video-based learning (VBL) is gaining increased attention as an educational means in settings such as the flipped classroom and massive open online courses. The value of VBL has been recognized in a range of contexts due to the ability to extend opportunities for life-long education for all socio-economic levels, removing geographical boundaries while at the same time alleviating time constraints. Yet, despite the advantages featured by VBL and some promising early outcomes regarding its effectiveness, little is known about what influences individuals to adopt VBL systems and technologies. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on behavioral and adoption-acceptance theories as well as on past empirical studies on e-learning, a conceptual model of VBL adoption is proposed. By analyzing survey data from 260 VBL learners, the conceptual model is put to test by means of structural equation modeling.

Findings

Outcomes indicate that performance expectancy (PE) and computer self-efficacy (CSEF) have a positive direct effect on behavioral intention to adopt VBL. In addition, effort expectancy (EE) and social influence positively impact PE, while CSEF is found to enhance EE and perceived behavioral control.

Originality/value

This study integrates several theoretical perspectives that are applied to adoption of novel information technologies and in addition builds on findings of past empirical research on learning technologies. In effect, the conceptual model along with outcomes provide an integrative perspective of adoption determinants.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2015

Cheryl Rosaen

This critical analysis investigates 23 studies on the use of video in pre-service literacy teacher preparation to gain a better understanding of the potential of…

Abstract

Purpose

This critical analysis investigates 23 studies on the use of video in pre-service literacy teacher preparation to gain a better understanding of the potential of video-based pedagogy for supporting pre-service teachers’ development of the complex set of knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed for teaching literacy in today’s classrooms.

Methodology/approach

This study extends what has been learned from prior reviews to investigate research focused on the use of video in pre-service literacy teacher preparation with particular attention paid to the extent to which pre-service teachers’ work with video helps them examine literacy teaching and learning in relation to race, language, culture, and power.

Findings

Working with video has strong potential for engaging pre-service teachers in reflecting on their own teaching, deepening their understanding of the challenges of engaging in literacy practices, fostering expertise in systematically describing, reflecting on, and analyzing their teaching, providing multiple perspectives on instruction, analyzing and assessing student growth, and discussing developmentally appropriate instruction. Results were mixed regarding changing teachers’ knowledge and beliefs. Overall, the tasks pre-service teachers completed did not explicitly guide them to focus on the relationship between characteristics of the diverse learners featured in the videos and issues of teaching and learning.

Practical implications

Literacy teacher educators could do more to take advantage of the affordances of using video to work more explicitly toward goals of helping pre-service teachers develop a critical consciousness, an inquiring stance, and a sense of agency, along with examining teaching practices that represent culturally responsive teaching. Pre-service teachers need explicit guidance in what to observe for and more focused discussion regarding their developing knowledge and beliefs about student diversity.

Details

Video Reflection in Literacy Teacher Education and Development: Lessons from Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-676-8

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Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Janie Busby Grant and Karin Oerlemans

Tertiary teaching in Australia, as elsewhere, now incorporates a wide array of learning resources delivered across different modes to support student learning. Since the…

Abstract

Tertiary teaching in Australia, as elsewhere, now incorporates a wide array of learning resources delivered across different modes to support student learning. Since the late 1990s, the sector has seen a rapid increase in use of materials that can be delivered online; however, not all students benefit, with static or falling participation rates among vulnerable student groups. This chapter describes the development and implementation of the federally funded Structural Adjustment Fund Flexibility, Innovation, Retention, Engagement (SAFFIRE) initiative to use new technologies to provide choice, flexibility, access, and support for students through a revamped curriculum in a medium-sized Australian university. SAFFIRE provided an opportunity to explore the introduction of flexible resources in tertiary teaching, including understanding the drivers, barriers, supports, and key factors in successful deployment of the changes. Within this context, the authors present a case study examining the effectiveness of course content delivery via video in an undergraduate psychology statistics course. The efficacy of video-based learning in the course was assessed through access rates, feedback, and performance, revealing strong evidence for the inclusion of video aids to improve student performance and satisfaction. The interpretation of the case study is embedded in the wider context of the process of deploying flexible online delivery within tertiary education.

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Jere Brophy

My original intention in writing this discussion chapter was to conduct a fine-grained comparison and contrast of what the contributors had to say about several aspects of…

Abstract

My original intention in writing this discussion chapter was to conduct a fine-grained comparison and contrast of what the contributors had to say about several aspects of making and using video in teacher education. However, my initial notes indicated that I would have nothing different and not much more to say than Ladewski (1996) already said in her comparison of four video-based teacher education programs. Furthermore, continued study of the chapters underscored the fact that seeming disagreements were mostly reflections of differences in the authors’ target learners and program goals, not actual disagreements about what or how video should be used.

Details

Using Video in Teacher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-232-0

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Subarna Sivapalan

This paper aims to discuss the outcomes of a study conducted to explore the perceptions and expectations of undergraduate engineering learners on the potential of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the outcomes of a study conducted to explore the perceptions and expectations of undergraduate engineering learners on the potential of incorporating sustainability within the Professional Communication Skills (PCS) module, via blended learning.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods case study approach was used, using surveys, learner reflections and interviews.

Findings

Key findings include (a) learners finding a heightened sense of awareness of environmental, social and cultural dimensions of sustainability, (b) development of sustainability literacy and communication skills for the real world, (c) scepticism and apprehension of blended learning teaching and learning methods, (d) development of capacity for self-directed learning resulting from flipped learning and (e) differences in quality of peer and lecturer interaction online and in the traditional classroom set up.

Originality/value

Sivapalan’s (2015) study suggests that Malaysian engineering graduates lack sustainability knowledge, competences and values, and often struggle to cope with professional responsibilities that require them to exercise these literacies. Much of this is attributed to the lack of sustainability integration within the undergraduate engineering curriculum, and within teaching approaches used. To date, there is little research within the Malaysian engineering education context to gauge the extent to which non-technical academic modules such as the PCS module could be used as a platform to incorporate sustainability learning outcomes. Research to gauge learners’ feedback and reflections on the integration of sustainability via non-technical modules and blended learning approaches is also scarce.

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Tingting Liu and Suria Zainuddin

This study aims to explore the extrinsic and intrinsic motivational factors that affect accounting students’ acceptance behaviour towards the online component of blended…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the extrinsic and intrinsic motivational factors that affect accounting students’ acceptance behaviour towards the online component of blended learning (OCBL) in the context of COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 354 accounting students from a Malaysian public university was selected. Confirmatory factor analysis, correlation and regression analysis and an independent sample t-test were used for data analysis.

Findings

The results showed that the predictor motivational variables in this study affected the acceptance behaviour of the participants except for perceived ease of use. Moreover, perceived value appeared to be the most influential factor. The results also indicated that postgraduates tend to accept the OCBL more than undergraduates.

Research limitations/implications

As the study participants were from only one public Malaysian university, generalisability is limited. In addition, this study only focussed on accounting students who were already enrolled in blended learning courses. Future studies could expand the population by considering those who have not signed up for such courses. Nevertheless, this study offers many theoretical and practical implications.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the OCBL literature, especially in accounting education, which was affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. It also offers practical suggestions for educational institutions and technology system designers to expand on the usage of OCBL and improve users’ acceptance of it.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 29 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2020

Kam-Cheong Li and Billy Tak-Ming Wong

This paper aims to present a review of case studies on the use of learning analytics in Science, Technology, Engineering, (Arts), and Mathematics (or STE[A]M) education…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a review of case studies on the use of learning analytics in Science, Technology, Engineering, (Arts), and Mathematics (or STE[A]M) education. It covers the features and trends of learning analytics practices as revealed in case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 34 case studies published from 2013 to 2018 reporting relevant learning analytics practices were collected from Scopus and Google Scholar for analysis. The features and trends of practices were identified through a comparison of the first (2013–2015) and the second period (2016–2018).

Findings

The results showed an increasing adoption of learning analytics in STE(A)M education, particularly in the USA and European countries and at the tertiary level. More specific types of data have been collected for the learning analytics practices, and the data related to students’ learning processes has also been more frequently used. The types of STE(A)M learning practices have become more diversified, with technology enhancement features increasingly introduced. The outcomes of the case studies reflect the overall benefits of learning analytics and address the specific needs of STE(A)M education. There have also been fewer types of limitations encountered in the learning analytics practices over the years, with unknown correlation among variables, small sample size and limited data being the major types.

Originality/value

This study reveals the implementation of learning analytics in relation to the contexts and needs of STE(A)M education. The findings also suggest future work for examining the adoption of learning analytics to cope with the development of STE(A)M and, in particular, how the successful experience of learning analytics in other disciplines could be transferred to STE(A)M.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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