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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2021

Adarsh Anand, Mohammed Shahid Irshad and Yogesh K. Dwivedi

YouTube allows its users to upload and view videos on its platform. YouTube provides notification to the subscribers whenever a channel uploads a new video thereby making…

Abstract

Purpose

YouTube allows its users to upload and view videos on its platform. YouTube provides notification to the subscribers whenever a channel uploads a new video thereby making the channel subscribers the potential viewers of the video. And thus, they are the first to come to know about any new offering. But later on, the view count also increases due to virality, that is, mass sharing of the content by the users on different social media platforms similar to word-of-mouth in the field of marketing. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to examine different diffusion patterns as they can help to inflate traffic and generate revenue.

Design/methodology/approach

YouTube's view count grows majorly through virality. The pattern of view count growth has generally been considered unimodal in most of the available research in the field of YouTube. In the present work, the growth process due to views through the subscribers and views due to word-of-mouth (virality) is presented. Considering that the impact of virality in view count growth comes later in the video life cycle; the viewing patterns of both the segments have been mathematically modeled; independently.

Findings

Different models have been proposed to capture the view count growth pattern and how the impact of virality changes the view count growth curve and thereby results in a multimodal curve structure. The proposed models have been verified on various view count data sets of YouTube videos using SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences), and their ranks have been determined using a weighted criteria–based approach. The results obtained clearly depict the presence of many modes in the life cycle of view counts.

Originality/value

Till now, the literature is evident of the video life cycle following a bell shape curve. This study claims that the initial thrust is by subscribers and then the contribution in the view count by people watching via word-of-mouth comes into picture and brings in another hump in the growth curve.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Wondwesen Tafesse

YouTube's vast and engaged user base makes it central to firms' digital marketing effort. With extant studies focusing on viewers' post-view engagement behavior, however…

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3353

Abstract

Purpose

YouTube's vast and engaged user base makes it central to firms' digital marketing effort. With extant studies focusing on viewers' post-view engagement behavior, however, research into what motivates viewers to click on and watch YouTube videos is scarce. This study investigates the implications of marketers' video optimization practices for video views on YouTube.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a data set of videos (N = 4,398) gathered by scraping YouTube's trending list. Using a combination of text and sentiment analysis, the study measured four video optimization practices: information content of video titles, emotional intensity of video titles, information content of video descriptions and volume of video tags. It then analyzed the effect of these video optimization practices on video views.

Findings

The study finds that greater availability of information in video titles is negatively associated with video views, whereas intensity of negative emotional sentiment in video titles is positively associated with video views. Further, greater availability of information in video descriptions is positively associated with video views. Finally, an inverted U-shaped relationship is found between volume of video tags and video views. Up to 17 video tags can contribute to more video views; however, beyond 17 tags, the relationship turns negative.

Originality/value

This study investigates the effect of marketers' video optimization practices on video views. While extant studies mainly focus on viewers' post-view engagement behavior, such as liking, commenting on and sharing videos, this study examines video views. Similarly, extant studies investigate videos' internal content, while this study investigates elements of the video metadata.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2018

Kennedy Kam Ho Chan, Cuiling He, Richard Chi Keung Ng and Jessica Shuk Ching Leung

The purpose of this paper is to explore the emotions reported by a group of student teachers (STs) after viewing their own teaching videos and those of their peers, as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the emotions reported by a group of student teachers (STs) after viewing their own teaching videos and those of their peers, as well as the reasons for those emotions. It also investigated the perceived influence of the STs’ emotions on their learning from the videos.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study involved 12 STs, and was situated in the context of a science methods course on a postgraduate teaching diploma program. The emotions associated with watching different types of video materials were investigated using a variety of data-collection methods, including written surveys, student-generated metaphors, and interviews. The emotion labels/words (e.g. horrible, joyful) and metaphors the STs used to describe their video-viewing experience, as well as the reasons for their emotions, were analyzed. The perceived influence of the participants’ emotions on their learning from the different types of video material was also analyzed qualitatively.

Findings

The findings suggested that most of the STs experienced negative emotions when viewing their own videos, whereas all of them reported positive emotions when viewing their peers’ videos. Distinct groups of STs displaying similar emotions while viewing the different video materials were distinguished. Their characteristics and the reasons for their emotions were identified. Analysis of the perceived influence of emotions suggested that they exert differential influences on learning from video materials, with the negative emotions associated with viewing one’s own videos reported to hinder such learning in most cases.

Originality/value

This study represents one of the few attempts to investigate the emotions related to STs’ video-viewing experience. The case study problematizes the lack of attention to the emotions associated with ST’s video-viewing experience in existing scholarship and highlights the fact that research findings on in-service teachers’ emotions associated with viewing different types of video material might not be transferable to novice teachers. The identification of distinct groups of STs who experience particular emotions when viewing different types of video material, as well as the differing perceived influence of those emotions on their learning, has implications for the effective use of videos to enhance learning in initial teacher education.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2020

Niyati Aggrawal, Anuja Arora, Adarsh Anand and Yogesh Dwivedi

The purpose of this study/paper is to propose a mathematical model that is able to predict the future popularity based on the view count of a particular YouTube video

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study/paper is to propose a mathematical model that is able to predict the future popularity based on the view count of a particular YouTube video. Since the emergence of video-sharing sites from early 2005, YouTube has been pioneering in its performance and holds the largest share of internet traffic. YouTube plays a significant role in popularizing information on social network. For all social media sites, viewership is an important and vital component to measure diffusion on a video-sharing site, which is defined in terms of the number of view counts. In the era of social media marketing, companies demand an efficient system that can predict the popularity of video in advance. Diffusion prediction of video can help marketing firms and brand companies to inflate traffic and help the firms in generating revenue.

Design/methodology/approach

In the present work, viewership is studied as an important diffusion-affecting parameter pertaining to YouTube videos. Primarily, a mathematical diffusion model is proposed to predict YouTube video diffusion based on the varying situations of viewership. The proposal segregates the total number of viewers into two classes – neoterics viewers, i.e. viewers those viewing a video on a direct basis, and followers, i.e. viewers those watching under the influence.

Findings

The approach is supplemented with numerical illustration done on the real YouTube data set. Results prove that the proposed approach contributes significantly to predict viewership of video. The proposed model brings predicted viewership and its classification highly close to the true value.

Originality/value

Thereby, a behavioral rationale for the modeling and quantification is offered in terms of the two varied and yet connected classes of viewers – “neoterics” and “followers.”

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Gohar Feroz Khan and Sokha Vong

– The purpose of this paper is to seek reasons for some videos going viral over YouTube (a type of social media platform).

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6724

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek reasons for some videos going viral over YouTube (a type of social media platform).

Design/methodology/approach

Using YouTube APIs (Application Programming Interface) and Webometrics analyst tool, the authors collected data on about 100 all-time-most-viewed YouTube videos and information about the users associated with the videos. The authors constructed and tested an empirical model to understand the relationship among users’ social and non-social capital (e.g. User Age, Gender, View Count, Subscriber, Join Date, Total Videos Posted), video characteristics (Post Date, Duration, and Video Category), external network capital (in-links and hit counts), and Virality (Likes, Dislikes, Favorite Count, View Count, and Comment Count). Partial least square and Webometric analysis was used to explore the association among the constructs.

Findings

Among other findings, the results showed that popularity of the videos was not only the function of YouTube system per se, but that network dynamics (e.g. in-links and hits counts) and offline social capital (e.g. fan base and fame) play crucial roles in the viral phenomenon, particularly view count.

Originality/value

The authors for the first time constructed and tested an empirical model to find out the determinants of viral phenomenon over YouTube.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Paul Huntington, David Nicholas and Peter Williams

NHS Direct Digital was available to almost exactly the same number of users in both Hull and London via two different transmission DiTV companies: Kingston Interactive…

Abstract

NHS Direct Digital was available to almost exactly the same number of users in both Hull and London via two different transmission DiTV companies: Kingston Interactive Television (KIT) and HomeChoice. This paper employs metrics based on server generated logs to compare use and user differences between the two services. Server logs that record user activity on a real‐time and continuous basis were made available and used to make comparisons between the two services. The data were collected for both services over a similar period, February 2002 to May 2002. During this period the NHS Direct Digital service was visited by approximately 3,000 people and more than 5,000 NHS Direct videos were viewed. Making the study probably the largest analysis of health videos ever conducted.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 55 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Peter Williams, David Nicholas and Paul Huntington

Reports on a qualitative study exploring a highly innovative digital TV pilot service. Focus groups of medical and health information professionals, “condition‐specific”…

Abstract

Reports on a qualitative study exploring a highly innovative digital TV pilot service. Focus groups of medical and health information professionals, “condition‐specific” subjects and “general interest” volunteers were recruited to obtain views about the videos generally, in terms of their content and presentation. Issues such as terminology used and the appropriateness of using video to deliver various types of information were also explored; the latter in the light of log statistics indicating relatively low use of videos as compared to text‐based services. Results indicated that those who used the services tended to be avid seekers of information, who saw the service as a first port of call to obtain general information for wider consultation later. Differences emerged between medical professionals and the lay public regarding the use of language and involvement of patients in the videos. Text was regarded as a better medium for conveying some types of information, such as simple facts that might need to be consulted on a regular basis.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 55 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Jere Brophy

My original intention in writing this discussion chapter was to conduct a fine-grained comparison and contrast of what the contributors had to say about several aspects of…

Abstract

My original intention in writing this discussion chapter was to conduct a fine-grained comparison and contrast of what the contributors had to say about several aspects of making and using video in teacher education. However, my initial notes indicated that I would have nothing different and not much more to say than Ladewski (1996) already said in her comparison of four video-based teacher education programs. Furthermore, continued study of the chapters underscored the fact that seeming disagreements were mostly reflections of differences in the authors’ target learners and program goals, not actual disagreements about what or how video should be used.

Details

Using Video in Teacher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-232-0

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2015

Mary B. McVee, Lynn E. Shanahan, P. David Pearson and Tyler W. Rinker

Our purpose in this chapter is to provide researchers and educators with a model of how the Gradual Release of Responsibility (GRR) can be used with inservice and…

Abstract

Purpose

Our purpose in this chapter is to provide researchers and educators with a model of how the Gradual Release of Responsibility (GRR) can be used with inservice and preservice teachers for professional development when teachers engage in reflective processes through the use of video reflection.

Methodology/approach

In this chapter we provide a brief review of the literature related to video as a learning tool for reflection and a discussion of the Gradual Release of Responsibility and emphasize the role of a teacher educator or more knowledgeable other who scaffolds inservice and preservice teacher reflection across various contexts. Several versions of the GRR model are included. We introduce and explain examples from two class sessions where a combination of inservice and preservice teachers engaged in reflection through video with support from a teacher educator.

Findings

We demonstrate that the teacher educator followed the GRR model as she guided preservice and inservice teachers to reflect on video. Through a contrastive analysis of two different class sessions, we show how the instructor released responsibility to the students and how students began to take up this responsibility to reflect more deeply on their own teaching practices.

Research limitations/implications

The examples within this chapter are from a graduate level teacher education course affiliated with a university literacy center. The course was comprised of both preservice and inservice teachers. The model is applicable in a variety of settings and for teachers who are novices as well as those who are experienced teachers.

Practical implications

This is a valuable model for teacher educators and others in professional development to use with teachers. Many teachers are familiar with the use of the GRR model in considering how to guide children’s literacy practices, and the GRR can easily be introduced to teachers to assist them in video reflection on their own teaching.

Originality/value

This chapter provides significant research-based examples of the GRR model and foregrounds the role of a teacher educator in video reflection. The chapter provides a unique framing for research and teaching related to video reflection. The chapter explicitly links the GRR to teacher reflection and video in contexts of professional development or teacher education.

Details

Video Reflection in Literacy Teacher Education and Development: Lessons from Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-676-8

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2015

Theresa Deeney and Cheryl Dozier

The purpose of this chapter is to outline specific features of the videotaped analysis experience to construct successful video reflection communities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to outline specific features of the videotaped analysis experience to construct successful video reflection communities.

Methodology/approach

In this chapter, we draw from our multiple studies of clinic practices, including interviews with lab/clinic graduates, a large-scale survey, and artifact analyses. We also draw from others’ research on videotaped reflection activities.

Findings

Our combined research showed three essential aspects of successful video reflection experiences, which we share in this chapter: Developing a culture of video sharing as learning, engaging with collegial feedback, and scaffolding teachers’ individual reflections. In each section of the chapter, we situate, within vignettes of practice, procedures we use to create successful video reflection experiences and prompts we have found effective.

Research limitations/implications

While we highlight three features of successful video reflection experiences based on ours and others’ research, we recognize these are not the only instructional practices that make the video reflection experience beneficial.

Practical implications

In this chapter, we provide instructors specific descriptions of how to arrange successful video reflection experiences, including prompts we have found most successful in generating rich group conversation, coaching, and individual reflection.

Originality/value

The success of video reflection experiences is dependent on how those experiences are framed and situated for teachers. This chapter provides detailed descriptions for teacher educators to use while implementing video reflection experiences.

Details

Video Reflection in Literacy Teacher Education and Development: Lessons from Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-676-8

Keywords

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