Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Adam Lindgreen, Michael Antioco and Martin Wetzels

The Internet is changing the way that companies carry out their business and, in fact, constitutes an entirely new application domain, which makes product innovation…

Downloads
1451

Abstract

The Internet is changing the way that companies carry out their business and, in fact, constitutes an entirely new application domain, which makes product innovation possible. Moreover, it is a new medium for reaching consumers, which is a central preoccupation to organisations in the current business market. Here interest lies in video chatting on the Internet. This is a type of service that adds video support to chatting using a Web cam and is gradually attracting more Internet users. The paper consists of a market feasibility study evaluating the potential commercialisation of a software program that enables the “cutting away” of the chatters from the original background filmed by the Web cam, and later re‐integrates them into a new background. The software program could, therefore, be interesting for advertising companies.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 9 January 2014

This chapter takes a look at the Social Web. Humanities scholars are, by and large, a fairly social group. Attend any of the Modern Language Association conferences and…

Abstract

This chapter takes a look at the Social Web. Humanities scholars are, by and large, a fairly social group. Attend any of the Modern Language Association conferences and you will be inundated with invitations to attend events hosted by publishers, groups within MLA, universities, and alumni organizations. The way we now include apps as an inherent part of our socialization, however, is changing and evolving as a result of some of the tools that are to be associated with the digital humanities, albeit not necessarily as apparently so as some others. This chapter explores the familiar players like Facebook™, Google+™, Twitter™, and others and discusses how they are being used by those in the field, contextualizing them within a variety of disciplines in the humanities through case studies while situating the category alongside theories that make sense of their use. Not as commonly used in academic social networks are vlogging applications along with student blog sites, which are also examined in this chapter. It is in this and subsequent chapters where augmented reality enhancements will be used. Please follow the directions at the beginning of Chapter 2 to access these additions.

Details

Digital Humanities: Current Perspective, Practices, and Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-689-7

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Alex Rockey, Lorna Gonzalez, Megan Eberhardt-Alstot and Margaret Merrill

Connectedness is essential for student success in online learning. By projecting themselves as real people through video, instructors support connectedness. In this…

Abstract

Connectedness is essential for student success in online learning. By projecting themselves as real people through video, instructors support connectedness. In this chapter, researchers apply the theory of social presence (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000) to case studies from two public higher education institutions: a four-year university and a large research university. Analysis identifies video as a humanizing element of online courses. Findings suggest video could be used in a variety of ways (e.g., video lectures, synchronous office hours, weekly overview videos), and no single use of video was perceived to be more or less effective in developing social presence and humanizing the learning experience. However, participants especially perceived connectedness when video was used in a variety of ways. Students from the second case study validated a perception of connectedness to the instructor that faculty in our first case study hoped to achieve. However, one instructor’s perception of disconnect illustrates that video is just one of several pedagogical practices necessary to create a satisfying learning experience for both students and instructors. While video is not the only way to establish social presence, findings suggest video is an effective practice toward creating a humanized and connected online learning community.

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Dries Van De Weghe and Yves Wautelet

Virtual learning environments (VLE) have in the past 15 years radically changed the way learning objects are spread among students and the way learners communicate with…

Abstract

Virtual learning environments (VLE) have in the past 15 years radically changed the way learning objects are spread among students and the way learners communicate with teachers. In parallel, social networks are now widely used by users with all kinds of profiles. Among social networks, Facebook is the one offering the largest array of functions and possibilities to be used as an open platform for various kinds of applications. That is why, in this chapter, we provide an overview of the possible use of Facebook as a VLE supporting a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). The authors distinguish generic functionalities that can be found in the three most popular xMOOC platforms as well as the relevant concepts needed for effective learning that are manipulated by such platforms. Then the authors evaluate how, within Facebook groups, features can be used to create a fully working MOOC environment. The authors distinguish notably class management, communication, collaboration, assessment, learning activity management and the possibilities for learning object management. Overall, the authors highlight that, except for the assessment, Facebook can support all of the functionalities required by a modern MOOC platform while offering a high social presence. While not vital for most MOOC followers, further developments can nevertheless be made to customise Facebook for ensuring this assessment functionality. The chapter can be used as guidance for an implementation of the social network as MOOC through the use of a Facebook group.

Details

The Future of Innovation and Technology in Education: Policies and Practices for Teaching and Learning Excellence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-555-5

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Donnelyn Curtis and Araby Greene

The University of Nevada, Reno Library offers a general‐information “Chat with us” service through the university Web site in conjunction with the “Ask a librarian”…

Downloads
1636

Abstract

The University of Nevada, Reno Library offers a general‐information “Chat with us” service through the university Web site in conjunction with the “Ask a librarian” service available through library Web pages. A study of 826 transcripts for the first academic year revealed that 80 percent of chat sessions originated from the university page. The majority of visitors were prospective students with questions related to admissions. Most of the chat operators believe the library should continue providing the university‐wide service. While university offices possess the information to answer many of the questions, librarians are skillful and patient when determining visitors' information needs, and were able to supply appropriate resources. Librarians were proactive in contacting university offices on behalf of chat visitors and provided e‐mail addresses, phone numbers, and URLs as needed. The continued collection and analysis of chat transcripts will help to determine the direction of library and university chat services.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 19 March 2013

Katerina Bohle Carbonell, Amber Dailey-Hebert, Maike Gerken and Therese Grohnert

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional format which emphasizes collaborative and contextual learning and hence has favored face-to-face course design. However…

Abstract

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional format which emphasizes collaborative and contextual learning and hence has favored face-to-face course design. However, with the plentitude of online tools which technology offers nowadays, PBL courses can also be effectively offered to students who cannot physically be present at the campus. The change process from offline to hybrid, blended, or online PBL courses need to be carefully managed and the right combination of technology and learning activities selected from the ever increasing available set. Hybrid, blended, or online courses differ in the amount of integration between offline and online activities. A mixed-method design was used to elaborate on how the different (hybrid, blended, or online) PBL courses can be effectively build and taught to create learner engagement. Twelve people (change agent, instructor, and participants) were interviewed and 82 students filled out a course evaluation form. The data was used to describe how a hybrid, blended, or online course was created and how the instructor and students perceived it. Instructional and change management implications for implementation are presented. Instructional implications deal with the needs of the learner, the role of the instructor, and the importance of sound technology integration in the course. Change management implication highlights the need to foster intra-institutional collaboration.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention in e-learning Environments: Web 2.0 and Blended Learning Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-515-9

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Aiman Turani and Rafael A. Calvo

The purpose of this paper is to describe Beehive, a new web application framework for designing and supporting synchronous collaborative learning.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe Beehive, a new web application framework for designing and supporting synchronous collaborative learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Our web engineering approach integrates educational design expertise into a technology for building tools for collaborative learning activities. Beehive simplifies the development of the collaboration tools required to implement proven educational design strategies. The methodology consists of a framework model that has three abstraction layers: pedagogical techniques, patterns, and computer supported collaborative learning components.

Findings

Building eLearning systems that are informed by the educational research in design patterns, can lead to a better, richer and more flexible, infrastructure. Beehive's design enables teachers to design and use synchronous collaborative learning activities, either by using well tested research‐based learning designs or by creating their own.

Research limitations/implications

The system will need to be used by a large number of teachers and learners before evaluation and usability tests are possible.

Originality/value

The paper presents an integrated solution application that enables teachers and students to design and carry out synchronous collaborative learning activities in a very simple manner.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Richard E. Lillie

Teaching Net Generation accounting students is a challenging experience. They anticipate that technology will be an integral part of the teaching–learning processes that…

Abstract

Teaching Net Generation accounting students is a challenging experience. They anticipate that technology will be an integral part of the teaching–learning processes that we offer them. This chapter focuses on how to use technology tools to create innovative course materials, delivery methods, and collaborative processes.

The chapter explains how I combined traditional instructional methods and technology-mediated learning (TML) techniques to create a practice–feedback–interaction process for use with two undergraduate auditing courses. I taught the first course (Auditing) during Fall Quarter 2006 and the second course (Advanced Auditing) during Winter Quarter 2007. I taught both courses in a blended instructional format.

This chapter shows how I used the practice–feedback–interaction process with individual and team writing assignments in the two auditing courses. I explain how the TML process works and describe technology tools used at each step of the process. Student comments provide feedback about how they reacted to using the technology-mediated teaching–learning process.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-519-2

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 30 December 2019

Ricardo Montelongo and Paul William Eaton

The purpose of this paper is to examine the online pedagogical practices and technological tools that influenced the attainment of skills and knowledge associated with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the online pedagogical practices and technological tools that influenced the attainment of skills and knowledge associated with professional multicultural competence in a graduate student online course focused on social justice and inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative case study includes a total of ten student participants. Two theoretical orientations guide the study. Mishra and Koehler’s (2006) model of technological pedagogical content knowledge is provided to understand the reciprocal relationship between content, pedagogy, knowledge and technology in online learning environments. Critical digital pedagogy (Morris and Stommel, 2018) provides insights into challenging the neutrality of technological tools and focuses on relational capacities of online learning environments. Initial coding by each researcher was reduced to thematic codes focused on technological tools, course content delivery, asynchronous and synchronous pedagogical strategies.

Findings

Data analysis revealed technological tools such as discussion boards, video, video conferencing and synchronous opportunities influence student engagement and learning. Further, findings reveal that the nature of online education itself – specifically asynchronocity – functions as both a distraction and possibility for online learning in multicultural education courses. Students in this study revealed the value of opportunities to engage synchronously in online learning environments. Instruction without such opportunities was disadvantageous to the learning of skills and knowledge associated with multicultural competence.

Research limitations/implications

The study is not generalizable to the experiences of all online students and only provides a small cross-section of online graduate students enrolled in a required diversity course at one institution.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of research focused on teaching courses in diversity, equity, social justice and inclusion in fully online environments, a gap this study begins to fill. The study also enhances the authors’ understanding of graduate student education.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 37 no. 1-2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Jaimie Hoffman and Autumn Willinger

As institutions forge forward with creating online learning experiences for college and university students, student affairs professionals should seek to create an…

Abstract

As institutions forge forward with creating online learning experiences for college and university students, student affairs professionals should seek to create an experience that anticipates and supports their needs from expression of interest in the program to graduation. The term “student affairs” encompasses administrative and management functions created to meet the needs of students including extracurricular activities as well as academic and emotional support. Student affairs departments may be involved in residence life, advising, leadership development, career services, advocacy and support services, and more. All students, including online students, excel both academically and emotionally when they feel valued, welcomed, and supported. The following chapter provides recommendations on ways campuses can transform the existing ecosystem of support services and engagement opportunities to be inclusive of online learners. A systematic review of the current ecosystem of support has been made to analyze the ways in which access is provided remotely to online learners and to ensure that the language and engagement opportunities shared with students are inclusive of online learners. In addition to this expanding of current support systems, it is recommended that campuses should consider specific initiatives they can create and implement for their online population including online orientation, success coaching, library support services, and the use of predictive analytics for student success.

Details

International Perspectives on Supporting and Engaging Online Learners
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-485-1

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000